Paw Care Tips for Dogs

Your dog’s paws are very important. After all, they let him touch, run, walk, jump, scratch, and much more! Keep your dog’s paws healthy with these tips from a Mattoon, IL veterinary professional.

Paw Check

Check out your dog’s paws and paw pads regularly. It’s very easy for small items—pebbles, burrs, twigs, bits of metal or plastic—to get lodged in between the toes or embed themselves in the paw pads. If you can remove these items easily with a set of tweezers, do so gently. If not, call your veterinarian for help.

Seasonal Paw Hazards

When it’s cold, road salt and ice can irritate your dog’s paw pads. During the summers, asphalt can heat up dramatically and burn the pads. Do your best to have your dog avoid these surfaces and materials to keep the paws safe and sound.

Nail Trims

Of course, nail trims are an essential part of paw care for dogs. If nails are allowed to grow long, they may fracture painfully or get snagged. Use a canine-specific nail trimmer to blunt your dog’s claws regularly.

Would you like more advice on keeping your dog’s paws in good shape? Contact your veterinary clinic Mattoon, IL.

The Importance of Playing with Your Pet

Playing with your pet is about more than just good plain fun (although it’s great for that, too!). Below, your vet in Atlanta, GA tells you about just a few of playtime’s many benefits.

Physical Activity

Playing with your pet keeps them physically active, which is essential for all aspects of their health. A pet who doesn’t exercise is likely to develop obesity and other harmful health problems, and playing is one of the best ways to get your pet exercising daily.

Mental Engagement

Pets who don’t play don’t get mental stimulation. This may lead to undesirable behaviors, from house soiling to aggression to improper chewing. Keep your pet’s mind stimulated just like his body—make a point to play with your pet daily.

Bonding Time

Another benefit of regular playtime is the bonding time it offers for you and your four-legged friend. The relationship you can have with an animal is one of the great joys of life, so foster and strengthen that bond with fun and productive playtime.

Ask your veterinarian what sort of play routines will work best for your particular pet, and set up an appointment with your veterinarian Atlanta, GA for a professional veterinary examination.

Beach Safety Tips for Dogs

It sure can be a lot of fun to take your canine companion to the beach. Just make sure he stays safe—use these tips from your vet in Jacksonville, FL.

Shade

Shade is very important for both you and your dog. Be sure to bring along a beach umbrella and provide plenty of space for your pooch to cool off under. You might even consider bringing a separate beach towel just for Fido.

Sunscreen

Dogs can get sunburnt, too! It’s especially likely on areas of exposed skin, like the nose tip or ear edges. Pick up a canine-formulated sunscreen at your local pet supply shop and apply it to your dog’s skin before heading out for a beach day.

Fresh Water

Although there’s an ocean of water in front of your dog, it’s not safe to drink from—the salt water will dry out your pet’s mouth, irritate the stomach, and dry out the skin. Bring along a thermos of fresh water just for your dog, and offer him sips from it every 10 minutes or so to keep him well-hydrated.

Would you like more safety tips for your dog’s next beach day? Call your pet clinic Jacksonville, FL.

How to Save Money on Pet Care

Let’s face it—we’d all like to save a little money now and again. As loving pet owners, though, we would never sacrifice our pet’s well-being to save cash! Below, your Wake Forest, NC vet gives you a few answers to the conundrum.

Preventative Medicine

Preventative medicine is not only far more effective than treating an illness or infection, it’s much cheaper. Make sure your pet is up-to-date on all core vaccinations, and any non-core vaccinations that he or she needs. Your pet should also be wearing year-round pest preventives to protect against fleas, ticks, and worms.

Spaying and Neutering

By having your pet spayed or neutered, you’re eliminating the risk of genital cancers and greatly lessening the chance that your pet will develop breast or prostate cancer and experience urinary tract infections and other common issues. Not only will this save you money, it will save you a lot of heartache down the road!

Home Grooming

Unless your pet has specific grooming needs that require a pro’s touch, you can save yourself a bit of money by performing your pet’s grooming at home with a pet brush and shampoo.

Ask your vets Wake Forest, NC for more helpful tips.

Animal Shelter Misconceptions

Likely because of the nature of their work, animal shelters often get a bad rap. So do the pets housed in them! Here, your Terre Haute, IN veterinarian sets the record straight.

Shelters and Their Pets are Dirty

This isn’t true in the least. Shelters must be kept to a high standard of cleanliness and sanitation so that diseases don’t spread amongst the animal population. Shelter pets aren’t dirty, either—they’re bathed, clipped, given nail trims and vaccinations, and even spayed or neutered in some cases on arrival.

Shelter Pets Are Poorly Behaved

Don’t make the mistake of thinking that pets wouldn’t wind up in a shelter at all if they were well-behaved. Take a trip to your local shelter—you’ll quickly see that the vast majority of pets there are perfectly well-behaved.

Shelters Only Have Dogs and Cats

Think shelters only house dogs and cats? Think again! The truth is, many shelters run pocket pet, reptile, bird, and even exotic pet adoption programs. If you’re in the market for a unique pet, consider adopting from your local shelter before visiting a pet store.

Talk to your veterinarian Terre Haute, IN professional for more information on adopting your next pet.

Three Signs of a Sick Bird

Do you own a bird? It’s your responsibility to tell when your pet isn’t feeling up to par. Learn about three common signs of illness in birds from your Lakewood Ranch, FL veterinary professional.

Loss of Appetite

Like many animals, a loss of appetite isn’t a good sign in birds. It could indicate everything from disease to infection to injury—if you’ve noticed a lot of extra food in your bird’s dish recently, it may be time to ask your vet’s opinion.

Cere Trouble

Your bird’s cere is essentially her nose; it’s the area above the beak where the nostrils are located. If you see discharge coming from this area, or notice dried crusts, inflammation, redness, or anything else out of the ordinary, call your veterinarian right away.

Ruffled Feathers

While birds do ruffle their feathers occasionally, they don’t keep them ruffled for long periods of time. If you’ve seen your bird sit with the feathers ruffled for a 24-hour period or longer, it’s time to place a call to the vet’s office for professional help.

Does your bird need a veterinary examination? Make an appointment today at your veterinarians Lakewood Ranch, FL to get your feathered friend help.

Protecting Your Pet From Sunburn

Did you know that pets are just as likely to get sunburnt as humans are? It’s most likely to occur on areas where fur doesn’t cover the skin completely, like the ear edges or nose tip. Here, your vet in Jacksonville, FL tells you how to protect your pet from the sun’s harmful rays.

Shade

Whenever your pet spends time outdoors, make sure they have a shady spot to seek refuge under. This could be an umbrella, hammock, or a tree. If your yard doesn’t have adequate shade trees, try setting up an awning or tent structure to give your pet some shade.

Sunscreen

There are sunscreens available exclusively for pets. Ask your veterinarian to recommend one, and visit your local pet supply shop to purchase a canine- or feline-formulated sunscreen.

Indoor Time

Of course, bringing pets indoors is another great way to protect against sun, and it also avoids the risk of deadly heatstroke and hyperthermia. Don’t leave your pet outdoors during the hottest months of the year—allow them indoors into the air conditioning.

Would you like even more great tips on keeping your pet safe from the sun and heat? Give your veterinarian Jacksonville, FL a call.

Signs of Illness in Birds

Do you own a bird? It’s up to you to recognize when your feathered companion isn’t feeling up to par. Learn about three signs of illness in birds below from your Arlington, TX veterinarian.

Ruffled Feathers

While birds ruffle the feathers as a part of their normal behavior, leaving the feathers ruffled for a long period of time isn’t normal. As a general rule, call the veterinarian if you see your bird sitting with the feathers ruffled for 24 hours or longer.

Discharge from Cere

Your bird’s cere is like their nose; it’s the small area above the beak that houses the nostrils. If you see discharge coming from this area, or notice dried crusts, inflammation, redness, or anything else abnormal, let your veterinarian know. Respiratory illness, infection, and other issues could be to blame.

Loss of Appetite

It’s safe to say that a loss of appetite is never a good sign in pets, birds included. If you’ve noticed more food left in your bird’s bowl recently, it may be time to check with your veterinarian. Various issues, from injury to disease to anxiety, could be the root cause.

If your bird needs medical attention, call your Arlington, TX veterinarian.

Animal Shelter Misconceptions

Probably thanks to the nature of the work they do, animal shelters are often misunderstood. Here, your Thorold, ON veterinarian sets the record straight on three of the most prevalent misconceptions.

Shelter Pets Are Old

Some people think that only old, unwanted, or abandoned pets come to shelters. This isn’t true. Take a trip through your local shelter, and you’ll see the truth firsthand—pets of every age, from puppies and kittens to elderly animals and everything in between, can be found in an animal shelter.

Shelters and the Pets in Them Are Dirty

This is false—shelters must be kept clean to prevent the spread of disease. Even if a pet arrives at a shelter dirty, they’re bathed, clipped, given nail trims and vaccinations, and possibly even spayed or neutered if necessary.

Shelters Only Have Dogs and Cats

Don’t make the mistake of thinking your local animal shelter only houses dogs and cats. Many shelters run programs for pocket pets, birds, and other types of animals. If you’re in the market for a unique pet, consider adopting from a shelter before buying from a pet store or breeder.

Ask your Thorold, ON vet for more information on animal adoption.

Hypoallergenic Exotic Pet Options

It can be heartbreaking for those of us who are prevented from owning a pet thanks to allergies. An option you may not have considered, though, is an exotic pet. Learn more here from your Sun Prairie, WI vet.

Fish

Fish are, of course, immersed in water. This means that they don’t have any way of giving off allergens! Sure, you cannot exactly cuddle your fish, but they’re fascinating to watch and are fun to take care of. Ask your vet for more information about the care of aquatic pets.

Reptiles and Amphibians

Reptile and amphibian pets—lizards, snakes, turtles, frogs, etc.—don’t give off dander or shed fur the way dogs or cats do. While many reptiles shed their skin, this isn’t’ likely to cause allergies. Plus, these creatures are contained in a terrarium, keeping any allergy-inducing substances effectively corralled.

Arachnids

It’s understandable that arachnid pets like scorpions and tarantulas aren’t for everyone. If you’re okay with them, however, they can make a great hypoallergenic pet! They’ll also be the most unique pet to be found anywhere.

Do you have further questions on the care and health of exotic pets? Contact your pet clinic Sun Prairie, WI for help.