Milk and Your Cat

Did you know that milk and cats—however great of a mix they may seem—don’t actually go together very well? Too much milk will almost certainly make your cat sick! Learn more here from a Tampa, FL veterinarian.

Why Can’t My Cat Drink Milk?

Most adult cats are actually lactose-intolerant. This means that they don’t have enough lactase in the gut to digest lactose, the main enzyme of milk. Drinking too much milk, or other dairy, will probably result in vomiting or diarrhea!

What About Kittens?

Kittens do need their mother’s milk, or a synthetic substitute if the mother’s milk isn’t available, for proper growth in the early stages of life. As they age, though, a kitten starts to produce less lactase. By the time they’re fully grown, a cat will most likely be lactose-intolerant and doesn’t need any milk at all.

What Can I Give My Cat?

Your cat needs one liquid to stay healthy: fresh water. If you want to give your cat milk, try a specially formulated “cat milk,” which has had the lactose removed to make it safe for your feline friend.

To learn more about your cat’s dietary needs, call your vet Tampa, FL.

How to Trim Your Canine Companion’s Nails

If you own a dog, it’s important to keep up with his grooming regimen. Part of that is regular nail trims! Nails that grow too long can fracture painfully and even affect Fido’s ability to walk. Here, your London, ON vet offers three easy steps for clipping your dog’s nails.

Get Your Supplies

First, gather everything you’ll need in a well-lit area of the home—it’s here that you’ll perform Fido’s nail trim. You’ll need a pair of nail clippers made specifically for dogs, a styptic powder or pen to staunch any bleeding, and a few dog treats.

Snip the Tips

Select one paw to start with, and gently extend a nail. Using your clippers, snip the very tip of the nail; you’re only trying to blunt the end. Snip too far, and you’ll cut the blood vessel and cause bleeding. This is where the styptic powder or pen comes in. If bleeding doesn’t stop after a few minutes, call your vet.

Repeat and Offer Treats

Repeat the process on the other nails, and work your way around to all paws. Reward your dog with a tasty treat after each paw!

Call your vet clinic London, ON to learn more.

Probiotic Supplements for Your Pet

We’ve all heard of antibiotics. Did you know that probiotics, which have existed in the human healthcare world for some time, can also be prescribed to pets? Learn more here from your vet Aurora, CO.

What Exactly Are Probiotics?

A probiotic is a beneficial microbe (a bacteria or yeast) that lives in your pet’s intestinal tract. They keep “bad” microbes at bay, and also help to digest food, get rid of pathogens, and manufacture vitamins and other nutrients.

A pet probiotic may be included in pet food, or it may come in a tablet or capsule form. Probiotics may also be included in a yogurt or kefir product.

What Are The Benefits?

Probiotics maintain the proper microbial balance in your pet’s intestines, so they might be prescribed by a veterinarian to help with any type of health issue that leads to digestive problems. Probiotics might also help relieve or manage infections and infestations, or even lower stress levels.

Does My Pet Need Probiotic Supplements?

Check with your vet before giving your pet a probiotic supplement. This will ensure that your companion stays perfectly healthy!

To learn more about your pet’s dietary and nutritional needs, contact your vet clinic Aurora, CO.

Three Reasons to Keep Your Cat Indoors

Do you keep your cat indoors? It’s a good idea for your pet’s health and safety—indoor cats tend to live much longer than those who venture outside! Here, your Plano, TX veterinarian tells you about three reasons to keep Fluffy inside:

Indoor Cats Are Less Likely to Contract Parasites

Although indoor cats can also contract fleas, ticks, and worms, it’s less likely than it is for an outdoor cat to come down with an infestation or infection. Avoid the troubles associated with these pets by keeping your cat inside and on quality preventative medications.

Indoor Cats Are at a Lower Risk of Poisoning

Outdoor cats might come across antifreeze, pesticides, rodent or insect poisons, fertilizers, and other chemical products that could poison them. Avoid these dangers entirely by keeping your cat inside! Indoors, you can control the environment and keep potential toxins far out of your cat’s reach.

Indoor Cats Won’t Be Struck By Vehicles

When your cat stays indoors, he or she won’t run the risk of getting hit by a car. Vehicle strikes are one of the leading causes of outdoor cat deaths!

To learn more about indoor cat care, contact your veterinary clinic Plano, TX today.

How to Slim Down Your Overweight Pet

Is your pet looking a bit pudgy? Many of our cats and dogs are overweight; nearly half, in fact! Use these quick tips from a veterinarian London, ON to help your pet shed the excess pounds and return to a healthy weight:

Portion Size

Many pets just need a smaller portion size to start losing weight. Overfeeding is one of the leading causes of obesity amongst pets! Ask your vet about a measured portion size that suits your pet’s needs, and remove uneaten food after about 20 minutes or so to make sure your pet doesn’t consume more than he needs.

Diet and Exercise

If your pet is eating a cheap food with a lot of empty calories, he’s only packing on the pounds. It’s time to upgrade to a high-quality diet that suits your pet’s age and size. Also, make sure to exercise your companion on a daily basis via walks and play sessions. There’s simply no substitute for physical activity!

Treat Tips

Don’t give your pet treats for no reason; use them for training or as rewards for good behaviour.

Need help slimming down your overweight pet? Call your animal hospital London, ON today. We’re here for you!

Obesity in Cats

Many of our feline friends are overweight; nearly half, in fact. It’s a serious problem that is about much more than a few extra pounds! Here, your veterinarian Rochester, NY tells you more.

Dangers of Obesity

Your cat’s excess weight can start to put more pressure on joints, making arthritis more likely. Obesity can also begin to affect digestive and respiratory organs, and ultimately shorten a cat’s lifespan!

Treating Obesity

Treating an obese cat will involve a tailored weight-loss plan. See your veterinarian if you think your cat is overweight; you’ll probably need to adjust Fluffy’s portion size, and you may need to upgrade her to a premium diet or a diet made specifically for weight-loss. Exercise is the other half of the equation—get your cat moving on a daily basis with playtime!

Preventing Obesity

Prevent obesity in the first place by feeding your cat in proper serving sizes and exercising her regularly. Ask your vet for a recommendation on a great diet choice, and ask about a measured portion size. Additionally, don’t overdo treats or fatty table scraps.

Need help getting your cat to lose weight? We are here for you! Call your animal hospital Rochester, NY today.

Special Care Tips for Brachycephalic Dogs

Do you own a brachycephalic dog breed? These breeds are characterized by their squashed faces and bulging eyes; a few examples are the Boston terrier, pug, Pekingese, and English and French bulldog. Learn more about the special care these breeds require from a North Phoenix, AZ veterinarian.

Exercise Smart

Don’t over-exercise a brachycephalic breed—it’s very easy for them to become overheated and exhausted thanks to their narrow airways and limited lung capacity. Exercise your pooch for a short time in the early morning or later evening hours, when it’s not extremely hot.

Dental Care

Thanks to brachycephalic dogs’ unique facial structure, the teeth tend to get crowded together. This can easily lead to dental problems, so it’s important to brush your canine companion’s teeth at home and to have the mouth examined regularly at the vet’s office.

Low Stress Level

When a brachycephalic breed gets stressed, it’s easy for them to experience respiratory problems. Do your best to keep things cool, calm, and collected around the house for your brachycephalic dog!

Does your dog need veterinary care? Want to know more about the unique care requirements of brachycephalic dogs? Make an appointment with your vet clinic North Phoenix, AZ.

Protecting Your Pet From Xylitol

Xylitol is a dangerous pet poison, and you might already have it in your home. It’s an artificial sugar commonly used in gums, candy, toothpaste, and other goods. Here, your Roanoke, VA veterinarian tells you more about xylitol poisoning in pets.

Symptoms

The symptoms of xylitol poisoning can begin to affect a pet in as little as 30 minutes after initial ingestion, and it only takes a few grams of the substance to cause poisoning. Symptoms include lethargy, drooling, vomiting and diarrhea, and—if treatment isn’t given promptly—seizures, coma, and even death.

Treatment

Rush your pet to the emergency room if you suspect or know that they’ve ingested a xylitol-sweetened product. The stomach may need to be flushed, and activated charcoal could be given to slow the poison’s absorption. Pets might need oxygen supplementation, fluid and electrolyte replacement, and other measures to make full recoveries.

Prevention Tips

Luckily, it’s easy to prevent xylitol poisoning. Never leave candy, gum, or sweet treats on countertops or tables where pets could reach. Keep all supply closets and bathroom cabinets shut tightly.

To learn more about xylitol and how it affects pets, call your animal hospital Roanoke, VA  today. We’re here for you!

Care Tips for Brachycephalic Dog Breeds

Do you have a brachycephalic dog? These breeds have squashed, flat faces and bulging eyes; the pug, Boston terrier, English and French bulldog, and the Pekingese are a few examples. Here are some quick tips from an vet Aurora, CO to keep your brachycephalic dog breed healthy.

Dental Tips

Because of your brachy’s unique facial structure, the teeth often crowd together. This means that dental issues are relatively common amongst these types of dogs. Brush your dog’s teeth regularly with a canine-formulated toothpaste, and schedule regular oral examinations at the vet’s office.

Keeping Fido Cool

It’s easy for brachycephalic dogs to overheat and experience respiratory problems, especially thanks to their small nostrils, elongated soft palate, and narrow windpipe. Don’t allow your dog to stay outdoors in hot weather for long periods, and keep exercise sessions short.

Avoiding Stress

Do your best to keep your brachycephalic dog from becoming stressed out. Like overheating and over-exercising, stress can lead to respiratory issues including trouble breathing. A brachycephalic dog will like a calm, low-key home environment best!

Does your brachycephalic dog need a veterinary exam? Want to know more about these wonderful breeds? We’re here to help. Call your veterinary clinic Aurora, CO.

Fluffy’s Hairballs

Have you ever seen your cat cough up a hairball? It’s not very pleasant looking, and it’s definitely no fun to clean up. Below, your veterinarians Marietta, GA tells you everything you need to know about your cat’s hairball production.

What Causes Hairballs?

When your cat grooms herself, barbs lining the tongue pick up loose hair from the coat. Your cat swallows this hair, and most of it moves through the digestive tract and gets expelled in the feces. Some hair remains in the gut, though, and clumps together in a hairball—that eventually gets coughed up, along with some stomach fluid.

Are Hairballs Dangerous?

No, the occasional hairball is perfectly normal for a healthy cat. However, if your cat is coughing up hairballs frequently, or if they’re gagging and retching without actually producing a hairball, you’ll want to have them see the vet right away.

Can I Help My Cat Cough Up Fewer Hairballs?

Yes, there are a few steps you can take to minimize hairball production. First, feed Fluffy a great diet to keep the coat healthy and minimize shedding. Secondly, brush your cat daily to remove loose hair.

To learn more, call your animal hospital Marietta, GA.