Traveling By Car With Your Dog

It’s a good bet that you’ll have to travel with your dog in the car at one point or another, whether you’re going on a family vacation or a trip to the vet’s office. Below, your Glendale, AZ veterinarian offers a few tips for safe car travel.

Car Anxiety

Many dogs aren’t comfortable in the car, probably because it only ever takes them to the vet’s office. Try acclimating your dog to the car slowly by allowing him to explore it while the vehicle is still parked in the driveway. Go on frequent, short trips around the block or to a local park.

Use the Carrier

It’s always safest to keep your dog in their carrier while in the car, rather than letting them roam free. This will keep your dog as safe as possible if you have to brake quickly, and it prevents your dog from blocking your feet or obstructing your vision while driving.

Pit Stops

If you’re going on a longer journey by car, take frequent pit stops and allow your dog to get out of the car briefly. This will help combat carsickness and provide a bathroom-break opportunity. Call your animal hospital Glendale, AZ for more tips.

Your Cat’s Dietary Needs

One of the easiest and most effective ways to keep your cat healthy for a lifetime is to feed them a high-quality diet. Your cat’s nutritional needs vary widely as she ages, though. Here, your Rochester, NY veterinarian gives you a crash course.

Kittens

Newborn kittens will require their mother’s milk for proper nutrition, or a milk substitute if the mother’s milk isn’t available. Gradually, kittens will start eating wet food and then can be transitioned to dry kibble as they get a bit older. Ask your vet for further specifics.

Adult Cats

Your adult cat should be eating a well-balanced premium diet made for middle-aged animals. This will give them all of the essential vitamins, minerals, proteins, and other nutrients necessary for a long, healthy life. Ask your veterinarian to recommend a great food choice for your adult cat.

Senior Cats

By the time your cat is a senior, her nutritional needs are quite different than they used to be. All aging cats should be fed a senior-specific diet to get the right balance of nutrients; ask your vet for his or her opinion.

For more information regarding your cat’s dietary needs, contact your veterinarians Rochester, NY today.

Protecting Your Pet From Mosquitoes

Mosquitoes like latching onto our animal companions just as much as they like latching onto us! Mosquitos, of course, can transmit dangerous disease like heartworm, so it’s important to prevent the problem. Learn how below from a Marietta, GA vet.

Repellents

Did you know that there are insect repellents made just for pets? Never use a repellent designed for humans on your dog or cat—it may do more harm than good. Ask your veterinarian for a recommendation on a pet-safe insect repellent for your next summer walk or vacation.

Preventatives

Keep your pet on a quality heartworm preventative. This is simply the best way to avoid the main danger that mosquitoes pose, and it also helps prevent infestation by other worms. If your pet needs a heartworm preventative, call your vet’s office right away.

Yard Tips

Since mosquitoes like to breed in stagnant water, remove any containers or objects from your yard that may hold water after it rains. This is the most effective way to keep mosquito numbers to a minimum in the areas where your pet spends a lot of time.

Would you like more information on mosquitoes and your pet? Contact your pet clinic Marietta, GA today.

Understanding Your Puppy’s Vaccination Requirements

If you’re new to puppy ownership, one of the first things you’ll need to have taken care of is vaccinations. They’re essential for a happy, disease-free life! Learn more below as your Cy-Fair veterinarian goes over the basics.

Core Vaccines

The core vaccines are considered necessary for all puppies based on the contagious and/or dangerous characteristics of the diseases they protect against. The core vaccines include those that ward off distemper, parvovirus, influenza, hepatitis, and rabies, among others.

Non-Core Vaccines

Non-core vaccines, as you’ve probably guessed, aren’t necessary for all puppies. They’re recommended for some, though, because of factors like environment, exposure risk, and others. The Bordetella vaccine, which prevents a kennel cough, is one example; it will likely be very helpful for a dog who will commonly be boarded later in life.

Scheduling

Most puppies can start receiving vaccines as young as eight weeks of age. From there, the initial round of vaccines will conclude at about 16 weeks of age, and then your pup will need occasional booster shots to keep vaccines effective for life.

For more information on the scheduling of your puppy’s vaccinations, contact your veterinary clinic Cy-Fair. We’re here to help as your puppy grows up!

Clipping Your Pooch’s Nails

When a dog’s nails grow too long, they can snag in carpets, fracture painfully, and even make walking difficult. That’s why nail trims are essential part of your dog’s grooming regimen! Below, your Indianapolis, IN veterinarian goes over the basics.

Gather Supplies

First, gather everything you’ll need in one area. This includes a set of dog-specific nail trimmers, a styptic powder to staunch any bleeding, and a few dog treats.

Snip the Tips

When your dog is calm, take one paw and begin snipping the nail tips with your clippers. Remember: you’re only trying to blunt the tip! Don’t clip too far, or you’ll snip the nail’s blood vessel and cause bleeding. This is where your styptic powder or pen comes in handy.

Repeat and Reward

Move around to each paw to clip all of your dog’s nails. Take your time—if your pooch becomes uncomfortable, give them a break before trying again later. Try giving your dog a treat after each paw is completed; this will reinforce the idea that successful nail trims warrant a reward!

For help with your dog’s nail trims, contact your animal hospital Indianapolis, IN. We’re here to help with all of your pet-care needs!

Understanding Your Cat’s Tail

One of the primary ways that your cat communicates is through her body language, and the tail helps to facilitate this. Have you ever wondered what your cat might be saying with her tail? Read on as your Fort Collins, CO vet offers some insight.

The Curve

Most of the time, you’ll see your cat’s tail held in a gentle curve. This is your cat’s “default” tail position, and it means that your pet is feeling relaxed, confident, and calm.

The Straight Position

You might see your cat hold the tail straight up in the air in a rigid manner; some refer to this position as the “flagpole.” It means that your cat is feeling poised and self-assured, and she’ll probably be up for a petting session or playtime. If you see the tail straightened but puffed, accompanied by wide eyes and hissing, your cat is upset and frightened—it’s best to get out of the way!

The Wrap

Cats have been known to wrap the tail around other pets or their owners; it’s a sign of affection, just like wrapping an arm around a loved one!

For more information on your cat’s behavior, call your veterinarian Fort Collins, CO.

Guinea Pig Care 101

Guinea pigs make wonderful little pets for the right family. They do have specific care needs, though! Learn more about the specifics of guinea pig care from your Crown Point, IN veterinary professional:

Cage and Bedding

Purchase a large wire-mesh cage for your guinea pig, and make sure it has a solid bottom to accommodate your pig’s wood-shaving bedding material. This bedding will need to be changed out on a regular basis to keep things fresh. Ask your vet to recommend a good bedding type and brand.

Dietary Needs

Guinea pigs need a steady supply of fresh timothy hay to chew on, as well as a commercial pellet diet to make of the bulk of their food intake. In addition, your pig will need fresh fruits and vegetables on a daily basis—cucumbers, zucchini, carrots, lettuce, kiwi, blueberries, and strawberries are good choices.

Handling Your Pig

Many guinea pigs are quite skittish; bear in mind that it may take weeks or even months before your pig warms up to human contact! Be patient while socializing your new pet.

Do you have questions about guinea pig care? Does your new addition need an exam? Call your animal hospital Crown Point, IN.

Three Easy Ways to Save on Your Pet’s Healthcare

Pets aren’t always cheap! Let’s face it—it would be nice to save a little money now and then when it comes to your pet’s healthcare. Here, your Jacksonville Beach, FL veterinarian tells you how to do that while maintaining your animal friend’s excellent health.

Practice Preventive Medicine

Have your pet vaccinated early on in life to ward off diseases like parvovirus, parainfluenza, hepatitis, distemper, and rabies. Keep your pet up-to-date on preventive medicines to keep fleas, ticks, and worms at bay. The costs of preventive medications are far less than treating a problem after the fact!

Spay and Neuter

Spaying and neutering, of course, saves you the cost of an unexpected litter. It also eliminates the risk of genital cancers, reduces the risk of many other cancer types, and even makes common problems like UTIs less likely to occur. All in all, it’s one of the most cost-effective procedures you’ll ever have your pet undergo!

Feed a Proper Diet

Ask your vet to recommend a great diet for your pet, and ask about proper portion size. It’s one of the best—and least expensive—ways to keep your pet healthy!

For more tips, call your pet clinic Jacksonville Beach, FL.

Vaccines for Puppies

Are you about to bring home a puppy? Vaccination is essential for keeping your new addition healthy for a lifetime. A Frisco, TX veterinary professional goes over the basics of puppy vaccines below:

Core Vaccines

All puppies need the core vaccines because of the dangerous and contagious nature of the diseases they protect against. Core vaccines include those that protect against distemper, parvovirus, parainfluenza, hepatitis, calicivirus, and rabies, among others.

Non-Core Vaccines

As the name implies, non-core vaccines aren’t considered necessary for all dogs. They are recommended in certain cases, though, depending on exposure risk, environment, and other factors. One example is the Lyme disease vaccination, which is helpful for any puppy who lives in an area where ticks are common.

Vaccine Scheduling

Puppies can start receiving essential vaccines as early as eight weeks of age. The initial vaccine regimen will conclude at about 16 weeks of age, and then puppies will need booster shots over time to keep vaccines effective. Booster shots are given on a yearly basis or in multi-year increments; ask your veterinarian for more specifics.

Does your puppy need his initial vaccinations? We’re here for you! Make an appointment today with your Frisco, TX veterinary clinic. Learn more here.

Don’t Believe These Rescue Pet Myths

Unfortunately, rescue and shelter pets are often misunderstood. Allow us to set the record straight! Your Pickerington, OH veterinarian dispels some common misconceptions below.

Rescue Pets Aren’t Well-Behaved

Some believe that a pet wouldn’t wind up in a shelter in the first place if they were well-behaved. This isn’t true; pets come to shelters for a myriad of reasons, and one of the least common is poor behavior. The vast majority of shelter pets are gentle, loving, and perfectly well-mannered.

Rescue Pets Are Old

Not true! Pets of any age can be found in a shelter, from young puppies and kittens to senior pets and everything in between.

Rescue Pets Are Expensive

Think shelter pets are expensive to adopt? Think again! The truth is that you’ll likely pay far less in adoption fees than you would purchase a pet directly from a breeder or a pet store. Plus, many shelter pets have already had essential vaccinations administered and they may be spayed or neutered, saving you the cost of these procedures in the long run.

Does your newly adopted pet need veterinary attention? Have more questions about rescue pets? We’re here to help! Contact your pet clinic Pickerington, OH today.