Dealing With Fido’s Bad Breath

Have you sniffed your dog’s breath recently? While it’s not likely to smell like a field of lilies, particularly bad breath could constitute a problem. Learn how to respond to your canine companion’s stinky breath below from a Frisco, TX vet.

Brushing the Teeth

One of the best ways to keep your dog’s mouth healthy—and therefore cut down on bad breath—is by brushing Fido’s teeth. Use a pet-specific toothbrush and a canine-formulated toothpaste to brush the teeth several times per week; it’s perfect for keeping your dog’s teeth and gums clean in between veterinary appointments.

Dental Chews

Dental chews and good chew toys are perfect for helping to scrape away loose plaque from the outer tooth surfaces, effectively removing it before it can harden into tartar. Ask your vet to recommend a quality dental chew, and provide your pooch with plenty of toys at all times.

See Your Vet

If your dog’s breath is particularly rotten-smelling, pay a visit to the vet’s office right away. Rotting teeth, periodontitis, and other serious problems could be to blame for the odor!

Would you like more advice for maintaining your pet’s dental health? Call your vet Frisco, TX for help.

Assembling Fido’s Emergency Kit

What better way to deal with an emergency situation than by being prepared ahead of time? When it comes to dog care, an emergency kit is a smart idea. Here, your Carmel, IN veterinarian tells you what to pack.

First-Aid Basics

Of course, your pet’s emergency kit should contain all of the essential first-aid supplies: gauze, bandages, a pet-safe disinfectant solution, medical tape, a pet thermometer, nail clippers made for dogs, several soft towels, a styptic powder or pen to staunch bleeding, and a few pairs of latex gloves for your hands.

Pet Medications

Does your dog take medicine to treat or manage a condition? It’s a good idea to pack a supply of the medication in your emergency kit. This way, you know exactly where the medicine is if your dog needs it in a pinch. Be sure to check any expiration dates periodically.

Medical Documentation

It’s never a bad idea to pack your dog’s medical records in a water-proof bag. Include proof of ownership and vaccinations, as well as documentation of any recent procedures your dog has undergone. These can be very helpful in an emergency!

For more information on pet emergencies, call your veterinarian Carmel, IN.

Preventative Care Basics for New Pet Owners

Why not avoid a problem initially, rather than deal with it later? Preventative medicine helps you to do just that! Keep your pet healthy with these preventative care basics as discussed by your Crown Point, IN veterinarian.

Vaccination

Having your pet vaccinated against dangerous and/or contagious diseases like parvovirus, parainfluenza, distemper, rabies, and more is the best way to prevent health concerns before they take hold. Pets can usually be vaccinated as early as eight weeks of age—talk to your vet if your pet needs vaccines.

Parasite Control

Fleas, ticks, worms… don’t let your pet fall prey to parasites. Prevent the problem initially by keeping your pet up-to-date on pest preventatives to ward off these dangerous critters. Ask your vet what preventatives will be most beneficial for your animal companion.

Veterinary Visits

When your veterinarian examines your pet on a regular basis—most vets recommend that they see your animal friend twice a year, at the very least—health concerns can be caught early and treated appropriately. It’s the best way to keep your pet healthy over time!

Does your pet need a veterinary exam, vaccinations, or pest-control medicines? Make an appointment with your veterinarians Crown Point, IN.

Tips on Placing Your Cat’s Litterbox

If you’re going to be adopting a cat soon, or if you’re moving to a new home with your feline friend, it’s important to consider where you’ll be placing Fluffy’s litterbox. The location is key! Learn more here from an Oshawa, ON veterinarian.

Easily Accessible Area

Rule number one: place your cat’s bathroom in a place that will always be accessible to her, even when you’re not at home. It’s all too easy for a swinging door, screen door, or similar obstacle to block your cat’s path. If this happens, she’ll be forced to eliminate on the floor!

Quiet Zone

Who wants to be disturbed while doing their business? Not your cat! Place your cat’s bathroom in a quiet location that won’t see a lot of traffic from family members or other pets. Cats who are startled while using their litterbox may be less keen to return to it in the future.

Far From Food Dish

It’s always a safe bet to place your cat’s litterbox far away from her food dish. After all, who wants to eat near their bathroom?

Do you need help acclimating your cat to her litterbox? Give your veterinarians Oshawa, ON a call today.

How to Keep Your Dog’s Coat in Tip-Top Shape

Everyone wants their dog to look their best. Did you know, though, that keeping your dog’s coat healthy is important for Fido’s overall well-being? Use these tips from a Cherry Hill, NJ veterinarian to keep your dog’s coat of fur in peak condition.

Feed a Great Diet

The first step to keeping your dog’s coat in great shape is to feed your pooch a high-quality, nutritionally balanced diet. This way, Fido receives all the vitamins and minerals he needs for healthy skin and a well-moisturized coat. Dietary supplements may also be helpful. Ask your veterinarian for more information about such products.

Brush Regularly

Run a brush through your dog’s fur daily. This removes loose and dead hair, and it also spreads essential skin oils through the coat to moisturize the fur naturally. You’ll be amazed at how good your dog looks simply from regular brushing!

 Bathe Occasionally

Make sure not to overdo baths, as it can dry out your dog’s skin and lead to irritation and an increase in shedding. When you do bathe Fido, always use a canine-formulated shampoo. Does your dog need help in the grooming department? We’re here for you. Call your veterinarian Cherry Hill, NJ

How to Tell if Your Pet is Obese

Nearly half of all domesticated dogs and cats are overweight, largely due to a lack of exercise and an improper diet. Are you wondering if your animal friend is obese? Use these tips from a Marietta, GA veterinarian to know for sure.

Do Your Research

Research online to find out what the average weight is for your particular pet’s breed and age. If they’re drastically over the mark, you might need to take action! Be sure to use reputable sources so that you’re not receiving bad information.

Physical Characteristics

Check out your pet’s stomach area. Is it bulging out? A healthy pet should have a trim line going slightly upwards into the back hips—if this line is straight or sagging downward, your pet is probably carrying too much excess fat.

See Your Vet

Of course, the best way to know for sure whether or not your pet is obese is to check with your veterinarian’s office. Set up an appointment today to have your Marietta, GA veterinary professional examine your animal companion. From there, you can find out whether or not your pet is truly obese and work together with your veterinarian to set up a tailored weight-loss plan.

Heartworm Infestation in Cats

We most often think of our canine companions as the ones who get heartworm. While heartworm is definitely more common amongst dogs, cats can also be infested! Learn more here from a vet in Rochester, NY.

How Do Cats Get Heartworm?

Cats get heartworm the same way that dogs do: from the bite of an infected mosquito. Mosquitoes bite an infected animal, then transmit the heartworm’s larvae—microscopic baby worms known as microfilaria—to a host.

What are the Symptoms?

Some cats may not show any symptoms at all even if they’re infected with adult heartworms; many times, the first sign in these cases is sudden collapse or death. If a cat does exhibit symptoms, though, they may include coughing fits, weight loss and lack of appetite, or occasional vomiting.

What’s the Treatment?

There isn’t a heartworm drug available for cats the way there is for dogs. Stabilization is the preferred treatment route, allowing your cat’s system to expel the worms on its own while closely monitoring your pet’s health.

Prevention is, of course, much more desirable than treatment—call your vets Rochester, NY office to get your cat set up on a monthly heartworm preventative. Better safe than sorry!

Three Common Cat Misconceptions

When it comes to cats, it’s important that you don’t believe everything you hear. There are many misconceptions floating around about our feline friends! Below, your pet clinic Livonia, MI sets the record straight on three of the most common myths:

Cats Always Land Upright

Cats don’t always land on their feet, no matter how graceful and poised they may seem. It’s entirely possible for cats to slip and fall of off high ledges or windowsills, injuring themselves quite seriously. Shorter falls are even more dangerous because cats may not have time to right themselves!

Cats Love Milk

This is a partial truth. Cats might love milk, but milk won’t show them the same affection in return! It turns out that most adult cats are lactose-intolerant, and drinking too much milk will result in vomiting or diarrhea.

Cats Purr When They’re Happy

While it’s true that cats might purr when they’re happy, they can also purr to express a variety of other emotions. Experts believe that cats might even purr to convey anxiety or anger!

Want more information on your cat’s behavior or health care needs? We’re here to help. Contact your vet clinic Livonia, MI today to set up an appointment.

FAQs on Catnip

You’ve heard of catnip, but how much do you really know about our feline friends’ favorite plant? Below, your Indianapolis, IN veterinarian answers some of your most frequently asked questions.

What Exactly is Catnip?

Catnip is an herb that grows in the wild, all across the world. The wild plant is leafy and green and has white flowers with characteristic purple spots. The catnip you’ll find in a pet store is a dried version of the plant, and it can also be included in sprays, toys, and other products.

Why Do Cats Respond to Catnip?

The oils of the catnip plant contain a chemical called nepetalactone, and this is what causes cats’ reaction to the herb. Experts believe that the reaction in your cat’s brain is a kind of sexual response—catnip is almost like an aphrodisiac to our feline friends!

Why Isn’t My Cat Responding?

Did you know that not all cats respond to catnip? A cat actually requires a certain gene, inherited from the parents, to feel catnip’s effects. If your cat isn’t responding to catnip, don’t worry—they are perfectly healthy!

For more information about catnip and your animal companion, contact your veterinary Indianapolis, IN today.

Three Signs of Illness in Cats

If you own a cat, you know that they can be rather mysterious. It’s often difficult to tell when your feline friend is sick! Below, vets Frisco, TX tells you about three of the first signs of illness in cats.

Change in Behavior

Has your cat been hiding more than usual? Acting out aggressively when she’s usually friendly? Behavioral changes like these may not be simple chance—it’s possible that your cat is feeling sick or is in pain. To be safe, have them examined by your veterinary professional.

Lack of Appetite

A lack of appetite isn’t a good sign in just about any pet, your cat included. If you’ve noticed that your feline friend isn’t eating normally, it’s worth a trip to the vet’s office. All sorts of illnesses and injuries could be to blame!

Poor Coat Quality

Did you know that your cat’s coat appearance is a good indicator of her internal health? While a cat’s coat quality may diminish a bit with age, a drastic change may be a sign of a problem. It’s best to get your vet’s professional opinion.

To set up an appointment with your veterinarian, contact your vet clinic Frisco, TX today.