Don’t Believe These Rescue Pet Myths

Unfortunately, rescue and shelter pets are often misunderstood. Allow us to set the record straight! Your Pickerington, OH veterinarian dispels some common misconceptions below.

Rescue Pets Aren’t Well-Behaved

Some believe that a pet wouldn’t wind up in a shelter in the first place if they were well-behaved. This isn’t true; pets come to shelters for a myriad of reasons, and one of the least common is poor behavior. The vast majority of shelter pets are gentle, loving, and perfectly well-mannered.

Rescue Pets Are Old

Not true! Pets of any age can be found in a shelter, from young puppies and kittens to senior pets and everything in between.

Rescue Pets Are Expensive

Think shelter pets are expensive to adopt? Think again! The truth is that you’ll likely pay far less in adoption fees than you would purchase a pet directly from a breeder or a pet store. Plus, many shelter pets have already had essential vaccinations administered and they may be spayed or neutered, saving you the cost of these procedures in the long run.

Does your newly adopted pet need veterinary attention? Have more questions about rescue pets? We’re here to help! Contact your pet clinic Pickerington, OH today.

How to Keep Fido Calm at the Vet’s Office

If your dog is like many, he’s not too keen on the vet’s office. There are a few things you can try to lessen Fido’s anxiety, though! Learn more here from a vet in Greensboro, NC.

Car Anxiety

Many dogs have car anxiety, and for good reason—the car only ever takes them to the vet’s office! If your dog is frightened of the car, warm him up to it a bit by taking him on frequent but short drives. This way, he’ll be less anxious when it’s time to visit the vet.

Mock Exams

Try staging “mock exams” at home in the weeks leading up to your dog’s next appointment. Prop your dog up on a table, steadying them with one hand, and poke and prod them a bit. This will get Fido used to the sensations he’ll feel during a real exam at the vet’s office!

In the Waiting Room

Bring along a few of your dog’s favorite toys, as well as a few treats, to give him a sense of familiarity in the waiting room.

Want more tips for calming your dog’s anxiety? Set up an appointment to see your veterinarian Greensboro, NC. We’re here for you!

Pet Danger Spots at Home

Even in the safest of homes are a few spots that can prove hazardous to pets. Fortunately, it just takes some simple precautionary measures to keep your animal companion safe! Learn more below from a vet in Marietta, GA.

The Kitchen

All sorts of human foods—grapes, raisins, chocolate, candy, gum, onions, garlic, chives, leeks, scallions, shallots, certain nuts, caffeine, alcohol, and much more—aren’t safe for pets. Kitchens also contain plenty of sharp objects and edges, including knives, graters, and forks. The hot surfaces of stovetops, coffeepots, and toasters are also hazardous. Keep your pet out of the kitchen when preparing food.

The Supply Closet

Almost every typical cleaning product contains a few ingredients that aren’t safe for pets. Everything from toilet bowl cleaner and air fresheners to carpet shampoo and furniture polish can pose a threat! Keep pets elsewhere when cleaning, and keep the supply closet shut tightly at all times.

The Medicine Cabinet

Various human medications—prescription drugs, aspirin, cough syrup, antidepressants, and much more—can poison a pet who manages to swallow them. Never allow your companion access to the medicine cabinet!

For more pet safety tips, give your veterinary Marietta, GA professional a call today.

The Basics of Catnip

How much do you really know about catnip and the way it affects our feline friends? Have you ever tried catnip on your pet? Learn more below as your Colorado Springs, CO vet goes over the basics.

What is Catnip, Anyway?

Catnip is a naturally occurring herb. It originated in Europe but has now spread all over the world. The wild catnip plant is a leafy green plant, characterized by white flowers with purple spots.

The catnip you’ll purchase in a pet store is a dried and processed version of the wild herb. There are also catnip sprays and toys available.

Why Does Catnip Affect Cats?       

The oils of the catnip plant contain a chemical called nepetalactone. It’s this substance that causes the reaction you see in cats. Experts believe that it induces a nearly sexual response in your cat’s brain—catnip is somewhat of an aphrodisiac to our feline friends!

Why Doesn’t My Cat Respond to Catnip?

Have you tried catnip out on your cat to no avail? Don’t worry—your pet is fine. Cats require a certain gene, inherited from their parents, to feel catnip’s effects.

For more information on catnip, call your animal hospital Colorado Springs, CO.

Pet Identification 101

One of the best things you’ll ever do for your cat or dog is keep them properly identified. It’s right up there with vaccination, pest control, and regular check-ups! Here, your Scottsdale, AZ veterinarian goes over the basics of pet identification.

The Importance of Identification

If you’re new to pet ownership, you might wonder why it’s so important to identify your animal companion. The reason is this: if your pet gets lost or runs away, identification is the number-one way that they’ll be returned to you safe and sound! If they’re left unidentified, the chances of finding them again are reduced drastically.

ID Tags vs. Microchips

Microchips are more permanent than ID tags, as they can’t be removed by a pet, and they’re easy to have updated if your contact information changes. ID tags, though, are more visible to those who find your lost pet. Most pet owners use ID tags and a microchip in tandem for maximum effectiveness.

Dog License

Many local municipalities require dog owners to get a license for their new addition. These are easy to obtain and aren’t expensive—talk to your vet for more information.

Does your pet need identified? Contact your vet Scottsdale, AZ.

Swimming Safety 101 for Dog Owners

It’s a lot of fun to take your dog swimming with you, whether you’re heading to the beach or simply taking a dip in your backyard pool. Keep a few safety tips in mind, though—learn more here from a Savannah, GA veterinarian.

Can Your Dog Swim?

Before attempting to get into the water with your dog, ask yourself a simple question: can your canine companion swim? Contrary to popular belief, not all dogs are strong swimmers! Most retriever-type breeds will do fine, but stubby dogs like pugs or terriers might not be comfortable in the water at all. Don’t force your dog to swim if he doesn’t want to.

Provide Support

When your dog does take a dip, always go in with him to provide support. This is especially important if you’re swimming in the ocean or a public body of water. Never let your pet venture too far off shore, and keep a close eye on them to make sure they don’t exhaust themselves.

The Final Rinse

Rinse out any chlorine or salt from your dog’s coat after the swim; these substances can irritate the skin if left there.

For more safety tips, contact your animal hospital Savannah, GA.

Saving Money When You Own a Pet

Let’s face it—pets aren’t always cheap! The question is, how do you save money while keeping your pet’s health in top form? Below, your Indianapolis, IN veterinarian gives you a few easy tips.

Preventive Care

By having your pet wear seasonal or year-round pest preventives to ward off fleas, ticks, worms, and mosquitoes, you’re avoiding the cost of treatment later. The same goes for vaccination—avoid dangerous diseases initially, and you’re saving yourself the cost of correcting these issues down the road.

Portion Control

Don’t overfeed your dog or cat, because you’re only wasting food. You’re also contributing to potential obesity, which can be costly to reverse later in your pet’s life. For advice on your pet’s proper portion size, contact your vet’s office for help.

Groom at Home

Brush and bathe your pet at home; this will keep your animal companion looking their best and lengthen the time needed between appointments at the groomers. Ultimately, it saves you money!

Does your pet need vaccinations or pest-control products? Would you like help to slim your four-legged friend down? We’re here to help with all of your most important pet care needs! Set up an appointment to see your vet Indianapolis, IN.

Stop Fluffy from Nibbling on Plants

It’s not uncommon for our feline friends to nibble on plants now and again. Not only can this harm your foliage, it might hurt your cat! Put a stop to Fluffy’s behavior with these tips from your Livonia, MI veterinary professional.

Training

Every time you see your cat nibble on plants, clap your hands and say “no!” in a firm voice. Over time, your cat should get the hint—going near the plant isn’t a good choice.

Alternative Options

Make sure your cat is fed a premium diet; some cats might nibble on plants in an attempt to get nutrition that they’re missing out on. You can also try providing your feline friend with cat grass, toys, and a scratching post—it’s possible that Fluffy is nibbling on plants because she isn’t properly stimulated with other items.

Deterrents

Another option is taste deterrents. These products are sprayed or otherwise applied to plants in order to ward off cats who get too close. Ask your veterinarian for a recommendation.

Does your cat need veterinary attention? Wondering what plants are dangerous for our four-legged friends? Give your vet Livonia, MI a call today. We’re here for all of your pet-care needs!

The Most Common Pet Poisons at Home

No matter how vigilant you are about pet safety, you undoubtedly have a few pet toxins at home. The trick is knowing what they are and how to have your pet avoid the danger! Learn about some of the most common in-home pet toxins here from a Lakeville, MN vet.

Human Foods

Plenty of human foods—grapes and raisins, onions, garlic, chives, leeks, shallots, macadamia nuts, chocolate, candy, gum, alcoholic beverages, caffeine, salty foods, fatty items, and much more—can poison pets if they get their paws on them. Store harmful foods safely where pets can’t reach.

Pesticide Products

If you set up pesticide products in or around your to home to get rid of insects or rodents, make sure they’re placed carefully where pets can’t gain access. It’s all too easy for these products to poison our four-legged friends!

Toxic Plants

Dieffenbachia, elephant ear, lilies, tulips, daffodils, various types of aloe plants, ivy, poinsettias, certain rubber plants, rhododendron/azalea… the list of poisonous houseplants and flowers goes on and on! Check your home for toxic offenders, and remove them at once.

For more insight into pet poisons in your home, call your vet clinic Lakeville, MN. We’re here to help!

Is Your Bird Feeling Ill?

It’s not always easy to tell when your feathered friend isn’t feeling up to par. As a bird owner, you must be aware of the initial signs of illness! Here, your Sugar Land, TX vet gives you a crash course:

Cere Issues

Your bird’s cere is the area that houses the nostrils, located just above the beak. If you notice runny discharge coming from the nostrils, or if you see dried crusts around this area, it’s time to let your veterinarian know. This could be a sign of infection or disease.

Ruffled Feathers

Yes, bird ruffles their feathers occasionally. If they keep them ruffled for an extended period of time, though, something might be wrong. As a general rule, let your veterinarian know if your bird keeps the feathers ruffled for more than a fully day.

Loss of Appetite

A loss of appetite can mean many things, but it’s always safest to have your bird examined if you’ve noticed him leaving more kibble in his bowl. Better to be safe than sorry!

For more information on your bird’s health and behavior, call your veterinary clinic Sugar Land, TX today. We are here to help with all of your pet care needs!