Three Pet Poisons That May Already Be in Your Home

That’s right, the following pet toxins may already reside in your home. Don’t worry, though—all it takes is a few precautionary measures to keep your four-legged companion safe from harm. Your Olathe, KS veterinarian elaborates below.

Toxic Plants and Flowers

The list of potentially hazardous plants and flowers is quite long. It includes lilies, dieffenbachia, elephant ear, certain aloe plants, the sago palm, oleander, poinsettias, chrysanthemums, daffodils, and even tulips. Remove any and all hazardous plant life from your home or garden if your pet is the type to nibble.

Human Foods

Plenty of human foods—chocolate, candy, grapes and raisins, onions, garlic, alcohol, caffeine, salt, and more—aren’t safe for pets. Never leave harmful substances out on countertops or tables where pets may be able to reach them.

Human Medications

Did you know that everything from aspirin and cough syrup to prescription pills and anti-depressants can harm a pet if they were to ingest too much? It’s important to keep your medicine cabinet tightly sealed at all times. Remember: a pet with strong jaws might be able to chew right through a flimsy plastic cap!

Call your veterinarian Olathe, KS to find out about other potential pet toxins.

Cats, Milk, and Dairy Products

Cats and milk just seem to go together. You may be surprised to learn that the two actually don’t mix! Learn more here from your vet in Ellicott City, MD.

Why Can’t Cats Drink Milk?

The majority of adult cats are lactose-intolerant, meaning that they don’t possess enough lactase in the digestive system to digest lactose, the primary enzyme of milk. Drinking too much milk will likely cause an upset stomach, diarrhea, or even vomiting.

What About Kittens?

Kittens drink their mother’s milk while nursing, yes. This is, however, the only time in a cat’s life cycle that milk is a nutritional necessity. As most cats age, they produce less lactase. By the time they’re fully grown, most cats are totally lactose-intolerant.

Is Other Dairy Okay?

Since other forms of dairy like yogurt or cheese generally contain less lactase than milk, they may be safer to feed to your feline friend. Still, it’s important not to go overboard. It’s safer to stick to cat treats or small bits of cooked meat instead—your cat will probably like these items more anyway!

Do you have questions about your cat’s diet or nutrition? Contact your animal hospital Ellicott City, MD for help.

How Do You Tell When Your Bird is Sick?

If you’re a bird owner, it’s up to you to know when your feathered friend isn’t feeling up to snuff. Here, your North Phoenix, AZ veterinary professional gives you a crash course in some of the most common signs of illness in birds.

Cere Trouble

Your bird’s cere is the area above the beak that houses the nostrils; think of it as your bird’s nose. If you see discharge coming from this area, or if you notice crusts, redness, inflammation, or anything else out of the ordinary, it’s time to notify your vet.

Ruffled Feathers

While birds do ruffle their feathers normally, they don’t typically keep them ruffled for long periods of time. If you’ve noticed that your bird has kept the feathers ruffled for a full day or longer, a trip to the vet’s office is in order.

Loss of Appetite

Like many other pets, a loss of appetite isn’t healthy in birds. If you’re noticing a lot of leftover food in your feathered companion’s bowl recently, tell your veterinarian. Everything from illness to infection to injury could be to blame.

Set up an appointment with your veterinary clinic North Phoenix, AZ if your bird needs prompt veterinary attention.

Dental Health Tips for Cats and Dogs

Our pets’ dental health is extremely important—did you know that oral issues are some of the most common health problems that veterinarians treat amongst domesticated dogs and cats? Don’t let your pet fall into the statistic; use these tips from an Aurora, CO veterinarian to keep their teeth and gums healthy.

Quality Diet

Good dental health starts with a great diet. Make sure your pet is eating a high-quality, nutritionally balanced food that is appropriate for their breed, age, weight, and body condition. Ask your veterinarian for a recommendation if you think your pet’s diet could be improved.

Good Chew Toys

Chew toys aren’t just a lot of fun, they help keep the teeth and gums strong. Plus, they scrape away some of the soft plaque on your pet’s tooth surfaces, removing it before it hardens into tartar.

Veterinary Visits

The best way to keep your pet’s dental health in check is by keeping regular appointments with your veterinarian. This way, your veterinary professional can catch any problems early on, before they’re allowed to develop into serious issues. If your pet needs a dental examination, set up an appointment with your vet Aurora, CO as soon as possible!

Where to Put Your Cat’s Litter Box

The placement of your cat’s litter box is extremely important—our feline friends tend to be rather picky! Here, your San Jose, CA vet gives you a quick rundown of where to put your cat’s bathroom.

Far from Food

Try to locate your cat’s box away from her food and water dishes. The expression about not wanting to use the bathroom where you eat applies to our feline friends as well! Cats have been known to shun either their bathroom or their food bowl if the two are placed in close proximity.

Quiet Zone

Would you want to use the bathroom where it’s crowded and noisy? Neither does your cat! Put your cat’s litter box in a quiet area without a lot of human or pet traffic. This way, your cat won’t be disturbed and can do her business in peace.

Easily Accessible Location

Don’t forget to check that your cat’s box is accessible at all times, even when you’re not home. It’s all too easy for a screen door or other obstacle to block off the room, forcing your cat to go elsewhere!

Talk to your San Jose, CA veterinarian for more advice on your cat’s litter box habits.

Dealing with Pet Odors in the Home

It’s not uncommon for our homes to start smelling a bit too much like our pets after a while. If you’d like to return your home to its former freshness, try these tips from a Greenwood, IN vet:

Grooming

Your pet is the source of the odor, so it makes sense to start there. Groom your pet daily, and you’ll notice a dramatic difference! Brushing your pet daily removes loose fur, preventing it from winding up on carpets and furniture, and it also spreads essential skin oils through the coat to keep the fur properly moisturized.

Pet Beds

Pet beds can often be a source of odors, especially if your pet hoards food there. Be sure to toss your pet’s bed into the washing machine regularly, and try sprinkling a bit of baking soda on it for a few hours before cleaning it off and returning it to your pet.

Odor Neutralizer Products

Air fresheners only mask smells. Odor neutralizers, however, combat the enzymes that cause odors in the first place, eliminating them for good. Pick up an odor neutralizer made to combat pet smells at your local pet supply store.

Contact your vet clinic Greenwood, IN for more advice.

Paw Care Tips for Dogs

Your dog’s paws are very important. After all, they let him touch, run, walk, jump, scratch, and much more! Keep your dog’s paws healthy with these tips from a Mattoon, IL veterinary professional.

Paw Check

Check out your dog’s paws and paw pads regularly. It’s very easy for small items—pebbles, burrs, twigs, bits of metal or plastic—to get lodged in between the toes or embed themselves in the paw pads. If you can remove these items easily with a set of tweezers, do so gently. If not, call your veterinarian for help.

Seasonal Paw Hazards

When it’s cold, road salt and ice can irritate your dog’s paw pads. During the summers, asphalt can heat up dramatically and burn the pads. Do your best to have your dog avoid these surfaces and materials to keep the paws safe and sound.

Nail Trims

Of course, nail trims are an essential part of paw care for dogs. If nails are allowed to grow long, they may fracture painfully or get snagged. Use a canine-specific nail trimmer to blunt your dog’s claws regularly.

Would you like more advice on keeping your dog’s paws in good shape? Contact your veterinary clinic Mattoon, IL.

The Importance of Playing with Your Pet

Playing with your pet is about more than just good plain fun (although it’s great for that, too!). Below, your vet in Atlanta, GA tells you about just a few of playtime’s many benefits.

Physical Activity

Playing with your pet keeps them physically active, which is essential for all aspects of their health. A pet who doesn’t exercise is likely to develop obesity and other harmful health problems, and playing is one of the best ways to get your pet exercising daily.

Mental Engagement

Pets who don’t play don’t get mental stimulation. This may lead to undesirable behaviors, from house soiling to aggression to improper chewing. Keep your pet’s mind stimulated just like his body—make a point to play with your pet daily.

Bonding Time

Another benefit of regular playtime is the bonding time it offers for you and your four-legged friend. The relationship you can have with an animal is one of the great joys of life, so foster and strengthen that bond with fun and productive playtime.

Ask your veterinarian what sort of play routines will work best for your particular pet, and set up an appointment with your veterinarian Atlanta, GA for a professional veterinary examination.

Beach Safety Tips for Dogs

It sure can be a lot of fun to take your canine companion to the beach. Just make sure he stays safe—use these tips from your vet in Jacksonville, FL.

Shade

Shade is very important for both you and your dog. Be sure to bring along a beach umbrella and provide plenty of space for your pooch to cool off under. You might even consider bringing a separate beach towel just for Fido.

Sunscreen

Dogs can get sunburnt, too! It’s especially likely on areas of exposed skin, like the nose tip or ear edges. Pick up a canine-formulated sunscreen at your local pet supply shop and apply it to your dog’s skin before heading out for a beach day.

Fresh Water

Although there’s an ocean of water in front of your dog, it’s not safe to drink from—the salt water will dry out your pet’s mouth, irritate the stomach, and dry out the skin. Bring along a thermos of fresh water just for your dog, and offer him sips from it every 10 minutes or so to keep him well-hydrated.

Would you like more safety tips for your dog’s next beach day? Call your pet clinic Jacksonville, FL.

How to Save Money on Pet Care

Let’s face it—we’d all like to save a little money now and again. As loving pet owners, though, we would never sacrifice our pet’s well-being to save cash! Below, your Wake Forest, NC vet gives you a few answers to the conundrum.

Preventative Medicine

Preventative medicine is not only far more effective than treating an illness or infection, it’s much cheaper. Make sure your pet is up-to-date on all core vaccinations, and any non-core vaccinations that he or she needs. Your pet should also be wearing year-round pest preventives to protect against fleas, ticks, and worms.

Spaying and Neutering

By having your pet spayed or neutered, you’re eliminating the risk of genital cancers and greatly lessening the chance that your pet will develop breast or prostate cancer and experience urinary tract infections and other common issues. Not only will this save you money, it will save you a lot of heartache down the road!

Home Grooming

Unless your pet has specific grooming needs that require a pro’s touch, you can save yourself a bit of money by performing your pet’s grooming at home with a pet brush and shampoo.

Ask your vets Wake Forest, NC for more helpful tips.