Essential Supplies for Your New Kitten

If you’re about to bring a new kitten into your home, it’s best to be prepared. That way, you’ll have everything you need to withstand the coming storm! Here are just three of the most essential supplies for a new kitten, as discussed by your Marietta, GA vet.

Litter Box

All cats need a litter box. Make sure to get kitty started early in life so that she gets used to the litter box. Place it in a quiet, low-key area where she can use it without being disturbed, and be sure to clean it on a regular basis.

Food and Water Dishes

Choose sturdy food and water dishes that can’t be easily knocked over by your rambunctious kitten. Stainless steel bowls are usually best, as they tend to be easy to clean and don’t hold bacteria or allergens the way plastic dishes might.

Scratching Post

Your kitten will get out a lot of energy on a sturdy scratching post, and it’s best to get your cat used to proper scratching while she’s young. Browse the selection at your local pet supply store to find a scratching post that’s perfect for Fluffy.

Learn more by calling your veterinarian Marietta, GA.

Why is My Dog Eating Grass?

Have you ever seen your dog eating grass? It’s a relatively common thing for our canine friends to do. But is it safe? Your Fort Collins, CO veterinarian fills you in below.

Why Do Dogs Eat Grass?

No one knows exactly why dogs eating grass, but there are several theories. One is that dogs may eat grass to induce vomiting, maybe to alleviate a gassy or upset stomach. A dog might also eat grass to add a little texture or roughage to their diet, or because they’re simply tired of their normal kibble.

Could There Be a Medical Problem?

Yes, it’s possible that a dog eating grass is doing so because of a medical issue. Your pup may be experiencing a nutritional deficiency and be eating grass in an attempt to seek out missing nutrients. Let your vet know if Fido is eating grass frequently.

Is Eating Grass Safe?

At the end of the day, it’s probably best to not let your dog eat grass. Even if there’s no medical issue at play, grass could have been treated with fertilizers or other chemicals, and you don’t want Fido ingesting them!

Call your vet clinic Fort Collins, CO to learn more.

External Cat Pests

Cats are at risk for external parasites—those that affect the outside of the body—even if they never set foot outdoors since the pests could be carried in on humans or other pets. Learn more here from your London, ON vet.

Ticks

Ticks can transmit dangerous diseases like Lyme diseases, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and Ehrlichiosis, among others. You don’t want your cat to have to deal with these issues! Talk to your vet about getting Fluffy on a tick preventative.

Fleas

Fleas are extremely common, and they’re not fun to eradicate. You might notice tiny black specks underneath your cat’s fur (flea droppings), and you’ll notice Fluffy scratching herself more than usual. Set your cat up on a quality flea preventative to avoid the issue entirely.

Mites and Lice

Mites and lice aren’t quite as common a problem for cats and fleas and ticks, but they can cause harm nonetheless. A mite or lice infestation can, luckily, be treated with shampoos and medications, so talk to your veterinarian if you’ve noticed your cat itching and scratching.

To learn more about external cat pests that can harm your feline friend, call your animal hospital London, ON. We’re here to help!

Why Is Fluffy Ignoring Her Litter Box?

Is your cat ignoring her litter box? Perhaps you’ve found her eliminating on your carpets and floors. Obviously, you’ll want to put a stop to this behavior right away. Here, your Murrieta, CA veterinarian tells you about three possible reasons your cat is shunning her bathroom.

Box Placement

Cats are picky about where their litter box is located. Don’t put it too close to food and water dishes, and make sure it’s placed in a quiet, out-of-the-way spot so your cat can use it without being disturbed.

Cleanliness

Who wants to use a dirty bathroom? Not your cat! Clean Fluffy’s box on a regular basis so that it doesn’t get dirty, because cats have been known to avoid the box altogether if it isn’t cleaned often enough. It cuts down on smells, too!

Medical Issues

There is a possibility that a medical issue, such as an infection or injury, could be preventing your cat from using her litter box properly. If you suspect this is the case, take your cat to the vet’s office right away for an examination.

Do you need help with your cat’s litter box aversion? We’re here for you. Call your animal hospital Murrieta, CA today.

The Basics of Fluffy’s Hairballs

You’ve probably dealt with hairballs before if you own a cat. They certainly don’t seem pleasant for your feline friend, but are they dangerous? Find out more from your Crown Point, IN veterinarian.

Why Do Hairballs Happen, Exactly?

Your cat grooms herself by licking the body with her tongue. Barbs lining the tongue pick up a lot of loose fur from Fluffy’s coat, which she swallows. Most of that hair moves through your cat’s digestive tract and is expelled in the feces, but some remain in the gut and clumps together into a hairball, which is eventually regurgitated.

Are Hairballs Safe for Fluffy?

Occasional hairballs are a normal part of life for your cat and is nothing to worry about. If it happens frequently, it’s time to see the vet––it’s possible that something is causing your pet to shed excessively. Also, vomiting is not same as coughing up a hairball, so let your vet know if your cat is vomiting frequently.

Can I Help My Cat Cough Up Less Hairballs?

Yes––brush your cat regularly to trap loose hair in the brush, and feed her a quality diet to minimize shedding.

Contact your animal hospital Crown Point, IN  for more information.

What to Do If Fido is Shedding Too Much

Is your dog’s shedding getting to be a bit much? Most of our canine companions shed, but sometimes it can get out of hand! Read on as your Ashburn, VA veterinarian tells you what to do if your dog is shedding too much.

Brush

Brushing your dog’s coat can do wonders when it comes to cutting down on shedding. That’s because the act of brushing traps loose fur in the brush itself, preventing it from winding up all over your home. Run a brush through Fido’s coat every day or every other day.

Improve the Diet

Did you know that your dog’s diet has a lot to do with his coat health? If your dog isn’t getting the right nutrients in the right amounts, the coat will suffer. It may be time to upgrade your pooch’s diet so that his skin and fur stays in peak shape. Ask your vet to recommend a good diet choice.

Check With Your Vet

If you can’t get your dog to stop shedding excessively, it’s time to see the vet. Medical problems—skin infection, parasitic infestation, and much more—could be to blame!

Call your animal hospital Ashburn, VA to set up an appointment.

Why Get My Pet Microchipped?

Is your pet outfitted with a microchip? There’s nothing wrong with ID tags on your pet’s collar, but microchips have many great advantages. Learn more below in this article from your animal hospital Columbia, MD.

Microchips Are Secure

Microchips cannot be removed by your pet, either by accident or on purpose. That means that even if a pet escapes your home unexpectedly, you have peace of mind of knowing that they’re constantly identified. The security this provides is well worth it!

Microchips Are Cost-Effective

Microchips aren’t expensive, and they’re extremely cost-effective because you only have to purchase one for your pet’s entire lifetime, in most cases. Even if you change telephone numbers or get a new home address, your pet can keep the same microchip—simply update your contact information with the microchip manufacturer!

The Microchip Procedure is Quick and Painless

The microchip capsule is inserted under your pet’s skin using a specialized hypodermic needle-like device. Your pet only feels a momentary pinch before the process is over; it’s just like a regular vaccination.

Ready to learn more about microchips? Want to have your pet outfitted with one for a lifetime of proper identification? Contact your vet clinic Columbia, MD.

All About Catnip and Your Cat

Does your feline friend go wild for catnip? It’s our cats’ favorite indulgence, but how much do you know about this fascinating plant? Your veterinarian Washington, DC tells you everything you wanted to know about catnip in this article:

What is Catnip, Exactly?

Catnip is an herb, classified together in the same family of plants as mint and other common herbs. It grows in the wild across North America and various other parts of the world. The “raw” catnip you’ll purchase in a pet store is a dried and processed version of the wild plant, and you can also purchase toys, sprays, and other products that contain catnip.

Why Does Catnip Affect Cats?

Catnip contains a chemical substance called nepetalactone. It triggers a chemical response in your cat’s brain, leading to the reactions you’ll see. Some experts liken it to a kind of sexual response in cats!

Why Isn’t My Cat Reacting?

Is your cat not reacting to catnip at all? No need to worry—your cat is healthy. If a cat doesn’t possess a certain gene, inherited from his or her parents, nepetalactone won’t have any effect in the brain.

Call your vet clinic Washington, DC to learn more.

How to Find Your Lost Cat

It’s a cat owner’s worst nightmare—your sneaky pet has slipped out of a cracked door or open window and disappeared into your yard. How do you go about getting your animal companion back? Here are three tips from an Aurora, CO veterinarian.

In the Night

Often, your cat won’t stray too far from home. If you can’t locate your cat right away, go outside around 2:00 a.m. and crack a can of wet food or a bag of treats. The sound will carry, and your cat is likely to come scampering back.

Hit the Pavement

Head out and post flyers around your neighborhood. Talk to neighbors, the mailman, and other locals to see if anyone has spotted your pet. There’s a good chance your cat is close by, and someone may have seen them recently.

Prevention Tips

Of course, it’s far easier to prevent a lost cat in the first place rather than find one. Do this by making sure windows and doors remain closed—be vigilant when coming or going. Keep your cat properly identified at all times with a microchip, ID tags, or both.

Want to learn more about preventing escape? Call your animal hospital Aurora, CO.

3 Care Tips for Brachycephalic Dogs

Brachycephalic dogs are those with squashed faces and bulging eyes like the pug, English and French bulldog, Boston terrier, and Pekingese. These breeds have special care requirements thanks to their unique anatomy! Learn more here from a Savannah, GA vet.

Keep Your Dog Cool

Brachycephalics tend to have small nostrils, elongated soft palates, and narrow windpipes. This means that breathing is more difficult than it is for other dogs. It’s easy for your Brachy to overheat when exercising, so don’t over-exercise them and keep them out of hot weather for extended periods.

Avoid Stress Whenever Possible

Stress is another factor that can lead to respiratory problems for Brachycephalic dogs, and it won’t be as easy for your dog to recover as it may be for other dogs. Avoid stress factors at home whenever you can; don’t make a fuss about coming and going, and don’t let your pet get overly excited during mealtimes or when guests come over.

Maintain Dental Care

Brachycephalic dogs tend to have crowded teeth thanks to their facial structure; dental issues are, therefore, rather common. Brush your dog’s teeth regularly!

Do you need help caring for your Brachycephalic dog? Contact your veterinary clinic Savannah, GA today.