How to Find Your Lost Cat

It’s a cat owner’s worst nightmare—your sneaky pet has slipped out of a cracked door or open window and disappeared into your yard. How do you go about getting your animal companion back? Here are three tips from an Aurora, CO veterinarian.

In the Night

Often, your cat won’t stray too far from home. If you can’t locate your cat right away, go outside around 2:00 a.m. and crack a can of wet food or a bag of treats. The sound will carry, and your cat is likely to come scampering back.

Hit the Pavement

Head out and post flyers around your neighborhood. Talk to neighbors, the mailman, and other locals to see if anyone has spotted your pet. There’s a good chance your cat is close by, and someone may have seen them recently.

Prevention Tips

Of course, it’s far easier to prevent a lost cat in the first place rather than find one. Do this by making sure windows and doors remain closed—be vigilant when coming or going. Keep your cat properly identified at all times with a microchip, ID tags, or both.

Want to learn more about preventing escape? Call your animal hospital Aurora, CO.

3 Care Tips for Brachycephalic Dogs

Brachycephalic dogs are those with squashed faces and bulging eyes like the pug, English and French bulldog, Boston terrier, and Pekingese. These breeds have special care requirements thanks to their unique anatomy! Learn more here from a Savannah, GA vet.

Keep Your Dog Cool

Brachycephalics tend to have small nostrils, elongated soft palates, and narrow windpipes. This means that breathing is more difficult than it is for other dogs. It’s easy for your Brachy to overheat when exercising, so don’t over-exercise them and keep them out of hot weather for extended periods.

Avoid Stress Whenever Possible

Stress is another factor that can lead to respiratory problems for Brachycephalic dogs, and it won’t be as easy for your dog to recover as it may be for other dogs. Avoid stress factors at home whenever you can; don’t make a fuss about coming and going, and don’t let your pet get overly excited during mealtimes or when guests come over.

Maintain Dental Care

Brachycephalic dogs tend to have crowded teeth thanks to their facial structure; dental issues are, therefore, rather common. Brush your dog’s teeth regularly!

Do you need help caring for your Brachycephalic dog? Contact your veterinary clinic Savannah, GA today.

Care Tips for Your Dog’s Fur

How is your dog’s coat of fur looking lately? Our canine companions aren’t quite as good at grooming themselves as our cats are, so that’s where you come in. Here are three quick tips from a vet London, ON to help you care for your dog’s fur.

Feed a Quality Diet

The first, and easiest, way to care for your dog’s coat is to feed him a high-quality diet. This ensures that your dog’s skin is getting all of the essential nutrients it needs, keeping follicles and hair healthy. Consult your vet for a recommendation on a diet choice that suits your dog’s age, weight, and breed.

Brush Regularly

Brush your dog on a regular basis. This removes grime from underneath the fur, smooths any tangles to prevent matting, and spreads essential skin oils throughout the entire coat. This moisturizes your dog’s fur naturally, giving it a healthy shine.

Bathe Occasionally

Bathing your dog occasionally keeps the skin and fur clean, and it helps your dog to smell his best. Don’t bathe too frequently, though—this can dry out the skin and fur, leading to a dull coat and more shedding.

Call your pet clinic London, ON to learn more.

Trick Your Dog Into Swallowing That Pill

Most dog owners will have to give their companions medication in pill form at some point or another. Of course, dogs can be picky—not all of our canine friends enjoy taking medicine! Your vet Brandon, FL offers a few tips on tricking your dog into taking his pill below:

Hide in Food

Often, the easiest method is to hide your dog’s pill in food. Try rolling it up in a slice of deli meat, or pushing it into the center of a glob of wet dog food. Check with your vet to make sure your dog’s pill can be taken with food.

Tossing Trick

Toss your dog a treat or two, then his pill, then another treat. With any luck, your pooch will be so excited for the stream of treats that he won’t even realize one was his pill! This method is particularly helpful for dogs who enjoy catching treats in mid-air.

Crushing Pills

Ask your vet about crushing or grinding your dog’s pill. If you’re able to, you can then sprinkle it over food or stir the medication into meals.

Want help with your dog’s medication? Contact your veterinary clinic Brandon, FL today. We’re here to help!

Removing a Tick from Your Cat

Would you be prepared to remove a tick from your cat’s skin if you found one? While your cat’s flea-and-tick preventative should help avoid the problem, ticks can still latch on to our feline friends. Here, your veterinarian Rochester, NY tells you what to do.

Prepare

Get everything you’ll need in one place before you set about removing the tick. You’ll need a pair of tweezers, rubbing alcohol as well as a small jar filled with the rubbing alcohol, a gauze pad, and a pair of latex gloves to protect your hands.

Remove the Tick

Grasp the tick with your tweezers, as close to your cat’s skin as possible, and pull straight out with even pressure. It’s important not to twist or jerk the tick as you’re pulling because this could cause the tick’s pincers to remain in your cat’s skin. Once you’ve completely removed the tick, drop it into your jar and apply more rubbing alcohol to the site.

Next Steps

Wash your tweezers with more alcohol to disinfect them. Keep a close eye on the bite area for the next few weeks. If you see something abnormal, contact your animal hospital Rochester, NY right away for help.

Three Flowers That Are Toxic to Pets

Many plants are toxic to pets, but flowers sometimes get overlooked. The truth is that many kinds of flowers can poison a pet! Here, your Glendale, AZ vet tells you about three of the most common offenders:

Lilies

Lilies are most dangerous for our feline friends, but it’s possible that they could harm dogs as well. Asiatic, Easter, Japanese, stargazer, red lilies, tiger lilies, wood lilies, and daylilies are all toxic varieties of the flower, among others. If you plant lilies in your yard or keep them indoors in bouquets, keep your pets away!

Chrysanthemums

Chrysanthemums are very common and contain pyrethrins, lactones, and other poisonous toxins that your pet shouldn’t ingest. Symptoms of toxicity include vomiting and diarrhea, drooling, and uncoordinated movements.

Tulips

You may be surprised to learn that tulips are also dangerous for pets. The bulb is the most hazardous part as it contains the highest concentration of the toxin—it can cause symptoms like hyper-salivation, depression, and vomiting and diarrhea.

Would you like to know what kind of toxic plants and flowers are most common in the area where you live? Contact your veterinary clinic Glendale, AZ today for help. We are always here for you!

Myths About Rescue Pets

Unfortunately, there are a few myths and misconceptions out there when it comes to shelter pets. The bad things you may have heard just aren’t true! Let your vet Westminster, MD set the record straight in this article:

Shelter Pets Are Poorly Behaved

This isn’t true—the vast majority of pets in shelters are perfectly well-behaved. Poor behavior isn’t a common reason that pets come to shelters in the first place; issues like abandonment and uncontrolled breeding are much more likely the reason that a pet arrived at a shelter.

Shelter Pets Are Dirty

On the contrary, pets and shelter facilities must be kept very clean and sanitary so that disease doesn’t spread in an area with so many animals housed in close quarters. Even if a pet is dirty when they arrive at a shelter, they’re quickly bathed and groomed!

Shelter Pets Are Old

This couldn’t be further from the truth. There are pets of every age in shelters, from older animals to puppies and kittens.

Are you in the market for a new pet? Bring your new companion to your animal hospital Westminster, MD to get them started off on the right paw. We’re always here to help!

Finding a Lost Cat

No one wants to think about their cat escaping. IF your feline friend manages to slip out, though, what do you do? Here are a few tips from a Frisco, TX vet.

In Your Yard

If you can’t immediately find your cat in your yard, try going out at about 2:00 a.m. with a few cats treats or a can of food. Even if your cat has ventured out of the yard, he or she may hear the sound in the quiet of the night and return to your yard.

Putting Up Flyers

If your cat is gone for longer than a full day, you might want to post flyers around your neighborhood. Include your contact information, and even consider offering a small reward. Enlisting the public’s help is one of the best ways to find your lost cat!

Preventing the Problem

Prevent the problem initially by being extremely cautious when coming and going from your home. Make sure all windows contain sturdy screens. Keep your cat’s identification updated in the form of a microchip, ID tags on the collar, or both.

Does your cat need identification measures? We’re here to help. Contact your vet clinic Frisco, TX right away.

3 Tips for Economical Dog Care

Most of us would love to save a little money here and there when it comes to our dog’s care. Of course, we would never sacrifice our pets’ well-being or happiness! Here are three tips on economical dog care from your veterinarian Murrieta, CA that also keep your pooch healthy:

Practice Preventative Care

Preventative healthcare is more effective than treating illness or infection, and it’s cheaper. Keep your dog on year-round pest control products to ward off fleas, ticks, and worms. Have your pet stay updated with essential vaccinations that protect against diseases like parvovirus, distemper, and rabies.

Use Portion Control

Don’t overfeed your dog—this wastes food, thereby wasting your money, and it can make your pet overweight. Obesity can be costly and time-consuming to reverse later in life, and it can lead to plenty of other health problems!

Spay or Neuter

Spaying or neutering your dog eliminates the risk of genital cancers, makes prostate and breast cancer far less likely, and even helps to reduce the risk of UTIs and other common ailments. What a great way to save on dog care!

Does your pet need pest-control products or a portion size recommendation? Call your vet Murrieta, CA.

Getting Your Dog to Swallow a Pill

Getting your dog to swallow medication in pill form is easier said than done. With that being said, you’ll undoubtedly have to do it at some point or another! Here are three tips from a Roanoke, VA vet:

Hide in Food

Hiding your pet’s pill in a glob of wet dog food or inside a roll of deli meat is often the easiest way to get Fido to swallow his medicine. Just check with your vet first—not all medicines are made to be taken with food, and instead must be given on an empty stomach!

Tossing Trick

Does your dog like to catch treats in mid-air? Use this to your advantage. Toss a treat or two to your dog, then the pill, then another treat or two in quick succession. If you’re lucky, Fido won’t even notice the difference!

Crush or Grind

In some cases, you’ll be able to crush or grind up your dog’s pill and sprinkle it over a meal or stir it into his food. Check with the vet first, though—this technique might render medicine ineffective or create a dangerous overdose!

For more information on your dog’s medicine, call your Roanoke, VA veterinary clinic today.