Tag Archives: vets rochester ny

Your Cat, Milk, and Other Dairy

Cats and milk seem like a natural match. You’re probably already picturing a cat lapping up milk from a saucer! Did you know that cats and milk don’t actually mix? Your Rochester, NY vet tells you more below.

Why Isn’t Milk Good for Cats?

Most adult cats are lactose-intolerant, just like many humans are. This means that they can’t properly digest lactose, the main enzyme found in milk. Although a small amount of milk isn’t likely to do any harm, don’t overdo it—your cat will experience an upset stomach, diarrhea, or vomiting!

Don’t Kittens Need Milk?

Kittens do require their mother’s milk (or a synthetic substitute) during the nursing stage. As they get older, though, they gradually become more and more lactose-intolerant.

What About Other Dairy Products?

Milk has the most lactose out of dairy products, so other dairy foods like cheese or yogurt can be a bit safer to feed to your cat. However, they’re not nutritionally necessary, and your cat may not even bother tasting them anyway! It’s always safest to stick to your feline friend’s normal diet.

Would you like more advice on your cat’s nutritional needs? Call your veterinarian Rochester NY today for help.

Heartworm Infestation in Cats

We most often think of our canine companions as the ones who get heartworm. While heartworm is definitely more common amongst dogs, cats can also be infested! Learn more here from a vet in Rochester, NY.

How Do Cats Get Heartworm?

Cats get heartworm the same way that dogs do: from the bite of an infected mosquito. Mosquitoes bite an infected animal, then transmit the heartworm’s larvae—microscopic baby worms known as microfilaria—to a host.

What are the Symptoms?

Some cats may not show any symptoms at all even if they’re infected with adult heartworms; many times, the first sign in these cases is sudden collapse or death. If a cat does exhibit symptoms, though, they may include coughing fits, weight loss and lack of appetite, or occasional vomiting.

What’s the Treatment?

There isn’t a heartworm drug available for cats the way there is for dogs. Stabilization is the preferred treatment route, allowing your cat’s system to expel the worms on its own while closely monitoring your pet’s health.

Prevention is, of course, much more desirable than treatment—call your vets Rochester, NY office to get your cat set up on a monthly heartworm preventative. Better safe than sorry!