Tag Archives: veterinary clinic thorold on

Toxins for Pets Already in Your Home

Even the most safety-conscious pet owner can’t help but have a few pet toxins in their home. The trick is knowing what to watch out for so that your pet stays safe! Learn more below from a vet in Thorold, ON.

Cleaning Supplies

Many household cleaning supplies—common disinfectants, bleach products like toilet-bowl cleaner, air fresheners, carpet cleaner, and much more—can poison a pet who manages to ingest them. Don’t leave your supply closet open, and move pets elsewhere when using chemical products.

Toxic Foods

All kinds of human foods aren’t safe for pets. The list includes garlic, onions, chives, leeks, scallions, shallots, grapes and raisins, avocado, caffeinated foods and beverages, chocolate, candy, certain nuts, fatty foods, and much more. Don’t let your pet chow down on table scraps, and keep them out of the kitchen during mealtimes.

Human Medications

Did you know that medicines like aspirin and cough syrup, found in nearly every home, can harm a pet who swallows too much? Antidepressants, over-the-counter drugs, and prescription pills can also cause serious harm. Don’t let your pet explore the medicine cabinet!

For more information on pet toxins at home, call your veterinarians Thorold, ON. We’re here for you!

The Truth Regarding Cats and Milk

Cats and milk just seem to mesh. You may be surprised to learn, though, that it’s a misconception! It turns out that cats shouldn’t drink milk at all. Learn more here from your Thorold, ON veterinarian.

Why Can’t Cats Drink Milk?

Most adult cats are actually lactose-intolerant, just like many humans. This means that they can’t properly digest lactose, milk’s main enzyme. If a cat drinks too much milk, they’ll experience an upset stomach at the very least, and vomiting or diarrhea is more likely!

Don’t Kittens Drink the Mother’s Milk?

Yes, kittens require their mother’s milk (or a synthetic substitute) during the nursing period. This is the only time in your cat’s life cycle, though, that milk is a nutritional necessity! As cat ages, they usually become more and more lactose-intolerant.

What About Other Dairy?

Since other dairy products like cheese or yogurt contain less lactose than milk, they’re a bit safer for cats. They’re not necessary in the least, though. If you must give your cat dairy products, keep the portion size extremely small!

Do you have questions about your cat’s dietary needs? Call the professionals at your veterinary clinic Thorold, ON. We are here to help!