Tag Archives: veterinary clinic Marietta GA

Considering Insurance for Your Pet

You can buy insurance for your pet just like you purchase it for your home, car, and health—it’s a great way to ensure your pet’s continued health if something unexpected happens. Here, your Marietta, GA vet goes over the basics of pet insurance.

How Pet Insurance Works

Pet insurance works like other insurance: you’ll pay a premium (monthly or perhaps yearly) and have a set deductible. If something happens to your pet, you’ll be able to use your insurance at designated providers to get your animal friend the healthcare they need.

What Pet Insurance Covers

Different types of pet insurance cover different things. There is catastrophic pet insurance, which covers major accidents and illnesses, as well as more routine plans that may help with medication costs or office visits. Talk to your vet to find out what type of pet insurance might work best for you and your pet.

Insuring Multiple Pets

Most pet insurance providers offer plans to cover more than one pet at once. This can be a great way to save money if you own more than one animal companion!

For more information on pet insurance, call your veterinary clinic Marietta, GA. We’re here for you!

Hazard Spots for Pets at Home

Did you know that just about any typical home has a few danger zones for pets? Fortunately, it just takes some simple precautions to keep your animal friend safe. Learn more here from a vet in Marietta, GA:

The Kitchen

Kitchens are home to a variety of sharp objects, as well as hot surfaces like stovetops, coffeepots, toasters, and ovens. They also house a host of foods that are harmful to pets—the list includes onions, garlic, chives, leeks, shallots, scallions, grapes and raisins, chocolate, candy, gum, avocado, salt, fatty foods, and much more. It’s best to keep pets out of the kitchen when cooking.

Supply Closets

All sorts of everyday cleaning products—bleach-based products, air fresheners, furniture polish, disinfectants, glass cleaner—can harm a pet who manages to swallow them. Move pets elsewhere if you’re using strong cleaners, and keep the supply closet shut tight at all times.

Medicine Cabinets

A variety of human medications, including aspirin, cough syrup, antidepressants, and over-the-counter and prescription pills, can poison pets! Keep medications stored properly where pets can’t reach, and stash your pet’s own medications in a separate area.

Want more advice on pet safety? Contact your veterinary clinic Marietta, GA today.

How to Tell if Your Pet is Obese

Nearly half of all domesticated dogs and cats are overweight, largely due to a lack of exercise and an improper diet. Are you wondering if your animal friend is obese? Use these tips from a Marietta, GA veterinarian to know for sure.

Do Your Research

Research online to find out what the average weight is for your particular pet’s breed and age. If they’re drastically over the mark, you might need to take action! Be sure to use reputable sources so that you’re not receiving bad information.

Physical Characteristics

Check out your pet’s stomach area. Is it bulging out? A healthy pet should have a trim line going slightly upwards into the back hips—if this line is straight or sagging downward, your pet is probably carrying too much excess fat.

See Your Vet

Of course, the best way to know for sure whether or not your pet is obese is to check with your veterinarian’s office. Set up an appointment today to have your Marietta, GA veterinary professional examine your animal companion. From there, you can find out whether or not your pet is truly obese and work together with your veterinarian to set up a tailored weight-loss plan.

All About the Catnip Plant

You’ve heard of catnip—it’s our feline friends’ favorite plant! How much do you really know about catnip? Below, your vet Marietta, GA goes over some common questions.

What is Catnip, Exactly?

Catnip is an herb, categorized in the same “family” of plants as mint. It grows in the wild, having originated in Europe, and is now found all over the world. The wild plant is a leafy green plant with purple-spotted white flowers.

In a pet store, you’ll find dried and processed catnip that looks much like oregano or other cooking herbs. Catnip can also be included in toys or processed into sprays and other products.

How Does Catnip Affect Cats?

A chemical called nepetalactone, found in the catnip plant’s oils, causes a chemical reaction in a cat’s brain. Cats may run around excitedly for a few minutes or simply relax in a state of euphoria; there are a wide variety of reactions! These effects will typically wear off after just a few minutes.

Why Isn’t My Cat Reacting?

Cats require a gene, inherited from their parents, to respond to catnip. That’s why some don’t react to the herb at all!

For more information, contact your veterinarian Marietta, GA.

Onion Toxicity in Your Dog

Did you know that onions, and foods related to them, are one of the most dangerous pet toxins out there? Our canine companions are the most commonly affected! Your Marietta, GA veterinarian tells you more below.

Symptoms

The main danger of onion toxicity is a condition called hemolytic anemia; the toxin causes your dog’s red blood cells to rupture. Associated symptoms include nausea, drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, and—without treatment—seizures and death.

Garlic is even more potent than onions themselves. Other dangerous foods related to onions and garlic include leeks, chives, scallions, and shallots.

Treatment

Your dog’s stomach may need to be flushed, or vomiting will be induced to rid the system of the toxin. Activated charcoal may also be administered to slow the poison’s absorption. Supportive therapies like fluid replacement or oxygen supplementation may be needed, and blood transfusions are necessary in severe cases.

Prevention

Of course, it’s best to prevent an episode of onion poisoning entirely. Restrict your dog’s access to onions, garlic, chives, leeks, scallions, and shallots at all costs! Store such foods inside cabinets or the refrigerator.

For more information on onion poisoning, as well as other toxic human foods, call your veterinary clinic Marietta, GA.