Tag Archives: veterinary clinic Marietta GA

All About the Catnip Plant

You’ve heard of catnip—it’s our feline friends’ favorite plant! How much do you really know about catnip? Below, your vet Marietta, GA goes over some common questions.

What is Catnip, Exactly?

Catnip is an herb, categorized in the same “family” of plants as mint. It grows in the wild, having originated in Europe, and is now found all over the world. The wild plant is a leafy green plant with purple-spotted white flowers.

In a pet store, you’ll find dried and processed catnip that looks much like oregano or other cooking herbs. Catnip can also be included in toys or processed into sprays and other products.

How Does Catnip Affect Cats?

A chemical called nepetalactone, found in the catnip plant’s oils, causes a chemical reaction in a cat’s brain. Cats may run around excitedly for a few minutes or simply relax in a state of euphoria; there are a wide variety of reactions! These effects will typically wear off after just a few minutes.

Why Isn’t My Cat Reacting?

Cats require a gene, inherited from their parents, to respond to catnip. That’s why some don’t react to the herb at all!

For more information, contact your veterinarian Marietta, GA.

Onion Toxicity in Your Dog

Did you know that onions, and foods related to them, are one of the most dangerous pet toxins out there? Our canine companions are the most commonly affected! Your Marietta, GA veterinarian tells you more below.

Symptoms

The main danger of onion toxicity is a condition called hemolytic anemia; the toxin causes your dog’s red blood cells to rupture. Associated symptoms include nausea, drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, and—without treatment—seizures and death.

Garlic is even more potent than onions themselves. Other dangerous foods related to onions and garlic include leeks, chives, scallions, and shallots.

Treatment

Your dog’s stomach may need to be flushed, or vomiting will be induced to rid the system of the toxin. Activated charcoal may also be administered to slow the poison’s absorption. Supportive therapies like fluid replacement or oxygen supplementation may be needed, and blood transfusions are necessary in severe cases.

Prevention

Of course, it’s best to prevent an episode of onion poisoning entirely. Restrict your dog’s access to onions, garlic, chives, leeks, scallions, and shallots at all costs! Store such foods inside cabinets or the refrigerator.

For more information on onion poisoning, as well as other toxic human foods, call your veterinary clinic Marietta, GA.