Tag Archives: pet clinic marietta ga

Fluffy’s Hairballs

Have you ever seen your cat cough up a hairball? It’s not very pleasant looking, and it’s definitely no fun to clean up. Below, your veterinarians Marietta, GA tells you everything you need to know about your cat’s hairball production.

What Causes Hairballs?

When your cat grooms herself, barbs lining the tongue pick up loose hair from the coat. Your cat swallows this hair, and most of it moves through the digestive tract and gets expelled in the feces. Some hair remains in the gut, though, and clumps together in a hairball—that eventually gets coughed up, along with some stomach fluid.

Are Hairballs Dangerous?

No, the occasional hairball is perfectly normal for a healthy cat. However, if your cat is coughing up hairballs frequently, or if they’re gagging and retching without actually producing a hairball, you’ll want to have them see the vet right away.

Can I Help My Cat Cough Up Fewer Hairballs?

Yes, there are a few steps you can take to minimize hairball production. First, feed Fluffy a great diet to keep the coat healthy and minimize shedding. Secondly, brush your cat daily to remove loose hair.

To learn more, call your animal hospital Marietta, GA.

Hazard Spots for Pets at Home

Did you know that just about any typical home has a few danger zones for pets? Fortunately, it just takes some simple precautions to keep your animal friend safe. Learn more here from a vet in Marietta, GA:

The Kitchen

Kitchens are home to a variety of sharp objects, as well as hot surfaces like stovetops, coffeepots, toasters, and ovens. They also house a host of foods that are harmful to pets—the list includes onions, garlic, chives, leeks, shallots, scallions, grapes and raisins, chocolate, candy, gum, avocado, salt, fatty foods, and much more. It’s best to keep pets out of the kitchen when cooking.

Supply Closets

All sorts of everyday cleaning products—bleach-based products, air fresheners, furniture polish, disinfectants, glass cleaner—can harm a pet who manages to swallow them. Move pets elsewhere if you’re using strong cleaners, and keep the supply closet shut tight at all times.

Medicine Cabinets

A variety of human medications, including aspirin, cough syrup, antidepressants, and over-the-counter and prescription pills, can poison pets! Keep medications stored properly where pets can’t reach, and stash your pet’s own medications in a separate area.

Want more advice on pet safety? Contact your veterinary clinic Marietta, GA today.