Tag Archives: pet clinic Aurora CO

Explaining Your Cat’s Kneading Behavior

In cats, kneading behavior is characterized by an alternated pressing of the front paws into a soft object; that object might be a pillow, a blanket, or your leg! If you’ve ever wondered why Fluffy does this, learn more below from a vet in Aurora, CO.

Territory Marking

Your cat’s paw pads contain scent glands, and your cat releases the scent when she kneads an object. In this fashion, she’s marking the object as her own in order to mark her territory. Consider it an honor if your cat kneads you—she might be claiming you as her own!

Napping Prep

You’ve undoubtedly seen your cat knead before napping. Many experts believe that the ancient ancestors of our domesticated cats kneaded grass or dirt in the wild in order to soften it up for bedding. Our current cats’ behavior might be linked to the actions of generations before!

Nursing Instinct

Kittens knead their mother’s belly during nursing in order to stimulate milk production. It’s possible that your adult cat associates the action of kneading with the positive feelings of nursing!

Do you have questions about your feline friend’s behavior? Contact your pet clinic Aurora, CO for help from the professionals.

The Basics of Catnip

You’ve undoubtedly heard of catnip, but how much do you really know about it? Find out all about catnip and its effects on our feline friends below from an Aurora, CO veterinarian.

What Exactly is Catnip?

Catnip is an herb, grouped into the same plant family as mint. It occurs naturally, having originated in Europe and since been spread all over the world. The catnip you’ll find in your local pet store is a dried and processed version of the wild plant.

How Does Catnip Affect Cats?

The oils of the catnip plant’s stem and leaves contains a chemical substance called nepetalactone. This substance affects the chemical makeup in your cat’s brain, eliciting the affects you see. The result is almost like that of an aphrodisiac, provoking a nearly sexual response! Cats may respond by becoming very excited and hyperactive, or they might become lackadaisical and prefer to lounge around in a sort of daze.

Is Catnip Safe?

Yes, catnip is perfectly safe for your feline friend. The effects will wear off after only a few minutes, and your cat will return to normal.

Do you have more questions about catnip? Contact your Pet Clinic Aurora, CO office today for help.

Your Cat and Lilies

Did you know that lilies are one of the most common toxins to afflict our feline friends? It’s important to take precautions to keep your cat from harm. Below, your Aurora, CO vet tells you more.

Symptoms

When a cat ingests a dangerous lily, symptoms like loss of appetite, lethargy, excessive drooling, vomiting, and diarrhea may present themselves. Without treatment, a cat may experiences seizures or even death.

While some lilies only cause minor mouth irritation, others cause the serious symptoms described above. These include the Easter, tiger, wood, Japanese Snow, day, and stargazer lilies.

Treatment

A cat who has ingested a lily should be rushed to the nearest veterinary emergency room. There, activated charcoal may be administered to slow the poison’s absorption, or the stomach may be flushed. Supplemental treatment like oxygen administration, fluid therapy, and other measures may be needed.

Prevention

Of course, it’s much easier to prevent poisoning in the first place rather than deal with it once it’s occurred. Since lilies are common in bouquets, check through any that you’ve received and remove lilies if necessary. Also check through your garden and landscaping outdoors.

Contact your pet clinic Aurora, CO for more advice on poisonous plants.