Where to Place the Litter Box

If you’re going to be adopting a cat in the near future, or if you’re moving to a new home or apartment with your feline friend, you’ll have to choose where to put the litter box. Use these tips from a Tampa, FL vet to do so effectively:

Far From Food

Cats don’t prefer to eat their meals next to their bathroom; who can blame them? To be safe, position your cat’s food and water dishes in a separate area from the litter box. This will ensure that your cat doesn’t decide to shun her bathroom or avoid eating and drinking entirely.

Quiet Locale

No cat likes to do their business in a crowded, noisy area. Instead, they want to use their litter box in peace and quiet. Put it in an out-of-the-way location like a quiet bathroom, laundry room, or mud room to make sure that Fluffy isn’t disturbed while using her box.

Easy Access Positioning

Don’t forget to place the litter box in a location that’s easily accessible by your cat at all times, including when you’re not at home.

For more information on your cat’s healthcare needs, contact your veterinarian Tampa, FL. We’re always here to help!

Freshening Your Pet’s Breath

Most likely, your dog or cat’s breath doesn’t smell minty fresh at all times. If you would like to freshen up your pet’s breath, benefitting his or her dental health at the same time, use these tips from your veterinarians Lafayette, LA:

Water Dish

Fresh water works wonders for good dental health, and therefore for fresh breath. Make sure your pet has a large dish of cool water to drink from as they please. This flushes out the mouth regularly, getting rid of plaque and food particles, and keeps your pet hydrated at the same time.

Brushing at Home

Did you know that you can brush your pet’s teeth at home? Pick up a canine- or feline-formulated toothpaste and a pet toothbrush at your local pet supply store to get started. You can also use dental chews or sticks to help keep the teeth and gums clean; ask your vet for recommendations.

Professional Cleanings

Professional dental cleanings at the vet’s office get at the deep nooks and crannies of your pet’s mouth, rooting out plaque and tartar. It’s essential for good oral health and fresh breath!

To set up your pet’s next dental cleaning, contact your animal hospital Lafayette, LA.

Onion Poisoning in Dogs

Did you know that onions are a serious toxin for dogs? They can harm cats as well, but our canine companions are most commonly affected. Learn more below from your vet in Savannah, GA.

Symptoms of Poisoning

Onions—as well as related foods in the allium family like garlic, scallions, shallots, leeks, and chives—contain sulfuric chemicals that prove toxic to dogs.

Symptoms of onion toxicity include weakness, drooling, discolored urine, and diarrhea and vomiting. The sulfur compounds in onions and related foods attack your pet’s red blood cells, which can cause deadly anemia if the issue is left untreated.

Treatment Options

Activated charcoal may be given to slow the absorption of the toxin in your dog’s stomach, or the stomach may be flushed to rid the system of the poison. Fluid therapy and other supportive measures might be needed as your dog recovers.

Preventing Poisoning

It goes without saying that preventing poisoning by onion is your best choice! Restrict your dog’s access at all times; store onions and related foods in cabinets or the refrigerator, rather than leaving them out where pets could get a paw on them.

For more information on pet toxins, call your veterinarian Savannah, GA.

Cats and Milk Don’t Mix!

Cats and milk might seem like a match made in heaven. Did you know that this pairing is not as idyllic as it may seem? Learn more below from your vet in Fort Collins, CO.

Why Can’t Cats Drink Milk?

Most adult cats are lactose-intolerant, just like many humans can be. This means that the cat can’t properly digest lactose, the main enzyme found in milk. Too much milk, and your cat will likely experience an upset stomach, vomiting, or diarrhea!

Don’t Kittens Need Milk?

Yes, newborn kittens will require their mother’s milk—or a substitute milk product—for the proper growth in the early stages of life. As a cat ages, though, they begin to produce less and less lactase in the gut, meaning that they gradually become more and more lactose-intolerant.

Is Any Dairy Safe for Cats?

Other types of dairy like yogurt or cheese contain less lactose than milk, so your cat might respond better to those foods. However, no dairy is nutritionally necessary for cats! If you must give Fluffy dairy foods as a treat, keep the portions extremely small to be safe.

For more information on your cat’s diet, call your vet Fort Collins, CO.

Microchipping 101

If you’re new to pet ownership, you may not have heard of identification microchips. They’re an effective, safe, and secure way to identify your pet for a lifetime! Here, your vet Marietta, GA goes over the basics.

What’s a Microchip?

A microchip is a tiny computer chip with a number implanted on it electronically. This number corresponds with a database where your pet’s contact information is stored. When a lost pet is returned to a veterinary office or animal shelter, scanning devices there can read the chip’s number. This allows the lost pet to be quickly and easily returned to the rightful owner!

How is it Implanted?

The microchip itself is housed in a tiny glass capsule; the whole unit is about the size of a large grain of rice. The capsule is then inserted under your pet’s skin using a special syringe-like device, and it won’t hurt your companion in the least. The whole process only takes a moment or two!

How Do I Get My Pet Microchipped?

Are you ready to have your pet microchipped? We’re always here to help. Set up an appointment today with your animal hospital Marietta, GA to have your pet’s microchip procedure completed.

Hairballs 101

If you own a cat, hairballs are probably a part of life. Have you ever wondered why your cat expels hairballs, and if they’re safe? Learn more below from a vet in Rochester, NY.

How Do Hairballs Form?

Cats ingest hair when they groom themselves. Most of that hair moves through the digestive tract and gets expelled in the feces, but some of it remains in the gut. That hair will eventually be regurgitated in the form of a hairball.

Are Hairballs Dangerous?

The occasional hairball is perfectly natural and shouldn’t cause your cat any harm. However, if your cat is expelling hairballs frequently, it’s worth a trip to the vet’s office. Also, if your cat is retching and gagging but not producing a hairball, it may be stuck in the trachea—rush your pet to the emergency room.

Can I Limit My Cat’s Hairballs?

Ask your veterinarian about simple diet changes or dietary supplements that can help your cat’s hair move through the digestive tract more smoothly. However, grooming your cat yourself is the best way to reduce hairballs—by trapping hair in the brush, your cat ingests less!

more information on hairballs, call your pet clinic Rochester, NY.

Pet Insurance 101

Did you know that you can insure your pet’s health, just like you have insurance for your car or home? It’s a great idea for many pet owners, especially those who care for senior animals, young pets, or pets with pre-existing conditions. Learn more here from an vet Oshawa, ON.

How Does Pet Insurance Work?

Pet insurance works like other types of insurance—you’ll pay a monthly or yearly premium, and have a set deductible to reach before the insurance starts reimbursing you. Different plans cover different things; there are accident-only plans, plans that cover preventative costs and wellness exams, and even plans that cover specialty procedures and alternative therapies.

Why Get Pet Insurance?

The benefit of pet insurance is the same as other types of insurance: if unexpected costs arise thanks to veterinary bills, you’ll have help paying. It’s a great idea for pets at special risk, like senior animals or disabled pets. There are also plans for those who own multiple pets at once, saving you money!

Can I Keep My Current Vet?

Most plans should allow you to keep your current veterinarian—choose another plan if there are restrictions!

Call your veterinarian Oshawa, ON for more information.

Three Tips for Lengthening Your Dog’s Life

Your dog offers years of love, loyalty, and companionship—why not keep them around for as long as possible? Use these three quick tips from a veterinarian Crown Point, IN to help your dog live as long and healthy a life as he possibly can:

Proper Diet

Feeding Fido a great diet is one of the simplest ways to keep him healthy for years on end. Ask your vet to recommend a great diet choice that suits your dog’s age, breed, and weight. That way, they’re getting the nutrition they need every day without a lot of extra calories!

Preventative Care

Have your dog wear seasonal or year-round preventative medicines to ward off pests like fleas, ticks, and worms. It’s also important to keep your dog updated on essential vaccinations against diseases like parvovirus, distemper, rabies, influenza, Lyme disease, and more. Talk to your vet if your dog doesn’t have vaccinations and pest-control medicines; it’s far easier to prevent health troubles before they strike!

Veterinary Visits

Having your dog visit the vet regularly is another great way to maintain his health for a lifetime. If your dog is need of an appointment, call your animal hospital Crown Point, IN today!

Insurance for Your Cat

You have insurance for your home, car, health, and more. Did you know that you can also insure your cat’s health? Below, learn about pet insurance and whether or not it may be a good choice for your cat as your vet Isle of Palms, SC tells you more:

How Does Pet Insurance Work?

Pet insurance works like other insurance that you’re used to. You’ll have a set deductible to reach before the insurance starts paying, and you’ll pay a monthly or yearly premium. Be sure to research particular plans’ stipulations, limitations, etc. to know exactly what you’re paying for—there are various types of pet insurance coverage!

Why Get My Cat Insurance?

Insurance may be especially helpful for cats who have pre-existing health problems, senior cats, young kittens who are prone to accidents or injury, or any other cat who is expected to need veterinary services often. It’s the same benefit as that of other insurance types—if you have unexpected veterinary bills, you’ll have help with the costs!

How Do I Get Started?

Talk to your Isle of Palms, SC veterinarian to find out if pet insurance is a good idea for your cat. We’re here to help!

Cat and Dog Microchips

Have you ever heard of microchips? They’re common in the tech world, but a different kind is also the best way to keep your pet properly identified! Here, your veterinarian Las Vegas, NV goes over the basics of microchips for pets.

What’s a Microchip?

A microchip is a tiny computer chip with a number implanted on it electronically. This number corresponds to a database where your pet’s contact information is stored. When a lost pet is returned to an animal shelter or vet’s office, scanning devices there read the chip’s number, which lets the professionals return the lost pet to the rightful owner—you!

What’s the Benefit?

Pets may be able to rip away or chew off collars with ID tags. Microchips, on the other hand, are permanent; you never have to worry about your pet going unidentified! Additionally, if you get a new phone number or address, there’s no need to purchase another chip—the same one your pet already has can be updated with your new information.

How Do I Get My Pet Microchipped?

Set up an appointment today with your veterinary clinic Las Vegas, NV to have your pet outfitted with a microchip. We’re here to help!