Exotic Pets for Beginners

Are you a prospective pet owner? Dogs and cats aren’t your only choices! Exotic pets can make great companions as well. Learn about some good options for beginning exotic owners below from an vet Oshawa, ON.

Hermit Crabs

Hermit crabs are easy to care for and are often considered great “starter” pets for young children. Although they can’t exactly be cuddled or taken for walks, they are fascinating to observe and care for! Ask your veterinarian for more information on hermit crab care.

Anole Lizards

The anole lizard is a small lizard that has minimal care requirements and only lives for a few years. It may be a great choice for you if you’re looking to dip your toes into the world of exotic pets! For more information on anole lizards and other great lizard pets for beginners, talk to your veterinary professional.

Fish

Fish require regular feeding and their aquarium will need cleaning, but they’re overall a great choice for new pet owners. Plus, they add a splash of color and excitement to any home!

Would you like more information on exotic pets and about what animal may be the right choice for you? Contact your veterinarian Oshawa, ON.

How to Protect Your Pet from the Sun

Generally speaking, the sun and our animal companions don’t mix. After all, they’re covered in a layer of fur that they can’t remove! Here, learn how to protect your pet from the sun as your Lafayette, LA vet offers a few tips.

Indoor Time

The easiest way to protect your pet from the heat and sun of summertime is by keeping them indoors for most of the season. This way, they won’t experience dehydration, heatstroke, or heat exhaustion. Keep exercise times quite short, and try to walk your pet in the early morning or evening hours when it’s a bit cooler outside.

Hydration and Shade

When your pet does spend time outside, make sure there is a shaded area for them to relax under. You should also provide a large dish of cool, fresh water for your pet at all times, inside and out.

Sunscreen

Did you know that pets can experience sunburn just like we can? Don’t let your animal friend fall victim to the sun’s harmful rays—try out a canine- or feline-formulated sunscreen to shield your pet’s exposed skin.

For more information on keeping your pet safe during hot weather, contact your veterinarians Lafayette, LA today.

Taking Your Canine Companion to the Beach

It sure is a lot of fun to take your dog to the beach. If you’re planning a shore excursion soon, make sure to keep your dog’s safety in mind. Use these tips from a veterinarian Frisco, TX to do just that:

Heat and Sun

Bring along a beach umbrella to provide shade for your dog, and pack a thermos full of cool water for Fido to drink from. Don’t let him drink ocean water, as this will only dry out the mouth and make your dog thirstier. If your dog appears to be getting overheated, it’s best to go back indoors where it’s air-conditioned.

Water Safety

Only allow your dog to venture into the shallows—if he swims too far out in the ocean, he might become exhausted or have to deal with a deadly rip tide. Always follow your pooch into the water to lend a supportive hand.

Check the Rules

Before visiting the beach with your dog, check the beach rules. Not every beach allows pets at all, and those that do may have specific requirements or restrictions.

Would you like more tips for taking your dog to the beach? Contact your vet clinic Frisco, TX today.

The Truth Regarding Cats and Milk

Cats and milk just seem to mesh. You may be surprised to learn, though, that it’s a misconception! It turns out that cats shouldn’t drink milk at all. Learn more here from your Thorold, ON veterinarian.

Why Can’t Cats Drink Milk?

Most adult cats are actually lactose-intolerant, just like many humans. This means that they can’t properly digest lactose, milk’s main enzyme. If a cat drinks too much milk, they’ll experience an upset stomach at the very least, and vomiting or diarrhea is more likely!

Don’t Kittens Drink the Mother’s Milk?

Yes, kittens require their mother’s milk (or a synthetic substitute) during the nursing period. This is the only time in your cat’s life cycle, though, that milk is a nutritional necessity! As cat ages, they usually become more and more lactose-intolerant.

What About Other Dairy?

Since other dairy products like cheese or yogurt contain less lactose than milk, they’re a bit safer for cats. They’re not necessary in the least, though. If you must give your cat dairy products, keep the portion size extremely small!

Do you have questions about your cat’s dietary needs? Call the professionals at your veterinary clinic Thorold, ON. We are here to help!

Onion Toxicity and Your Dog

Did you know that onions are one of the most dangerous foods out there for our canine companions? Of course, they’re also very common in most households. Learn more below from your North Phoenix, AZ veterinarian.

Why Are Onions Dangerous?

Onions contain a chemical called thiosulphate, and it’s this chemical that causes problems. In particular, it can lead to hemolytic anemia, a condition in which your dog’s red blood cells become damaged to the point of bursting.

It’s important to note that foods related to onions—garlic, shallots, scallions, leeks, chives, etc.—also contain thiosulphate and are equally dangerous.

What are the Symptoms?

The symptoms of onion toxicity include weakness, loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, and breathing difficulty. These symptoms may be delayed, meaning that they can appear several days after ingestion—yet another reason why onions are so dangerous!

What If My Dog Eats an Onion?

If you see or suspect that your dog has eaten an onion or a related food, call ahead to your vet’s office and rush your dog there as quickly as possible. Quick veterinary action is the best way to make sure your dog recovers!

For more information, call your animal hospital North Phoenix, AZ.

How to Save Money on Animal Care

Let’s face it—everyone would like to save a little money here and there. How do you do that when it comes to your pet? Here, your Carmel, IN vet tells you about a few easy ways to save cash without causing detriment to your animal friend’s health.

Preventive Medicine

Preventive medicine isn’t just more effective than treatment, it’s far less expensive. Save yourself money by having your pet wear year-round pest preventatives to ward off infestations or infections. Keep them up-to-date on proper vaccinations to prevent disease. It’s a great way to save money in the long run!

Portion Control

Don’t overfeed your pet; feed them in proper, measured portion sizes to keep them at a healthy weight. Obesity can be costly and time-consuming to correct! Plus, you’re wasting food and will have to buy more sooner rather than later.

Home Grooming

Unless your pet has special grooming needs, you can save a little money by grooming them yourself at home. Ask your vet what sort of brush and bristle type will work best on your particular pet’s coat of fur.

Want more tips for saving money on pet care? Don’t hesitate to call your veterinary clinic Carmel, IN.

Defeating Litter Box Odors

Litter boxes, for obvious reasons, can be a bit smelly. There are many ways to combat the problem, though! Here, your Coon Rapids, MN vet tells you what to do if Fluffy’s bathroom is becoming a bit too odorous.

Closed Box

Does your cat’s litter box have a top portion? If not, purchase or construct one promptly. Closing off your cat’s box will do wonders for containing the smell! An open litter box allows odors to float around unrestricted.

Scented Litter

Try switching up your cat’s litter—pick a litter type that is made to seal in odors effectively. If you’d like a recommendation on a great litter choice, contact your vet’s office for help.

Regular Cleaning

There’s just no substitute for regular cleaning when it comes to your cat’s bathroom. Scoop it out on a daily basis, and be sure to add a bit of fresh litter to replace that which you’ve removed. Once a week or so, clean out the litter and replace it entirely with fresh litter. This will ensure that your cat’s bathroom stays clean and odor-free at all times.

Would you like more tips on caring for your cat? Call your veterinary clinic Coon Rapids, MN.

What Kind of Leash is Right for Your Dog?

If you’ve recently adopted a dog, you’ll need to get them a proper leash if you haven’t done so already. There are all sorts of leashes available—how do you know what to choose? Your Lafayette, LA veterinarian gives you a crash course below:

The Standard Leash

For the vast majority of dogs, the standard leash will work well. They’re typically about six feet long, although they come in shorter and longer sizes, and are most often made of a strong nylon material. The standard leash has a clasp on one end to attach to your dog’s collar, and a loop on the other for you to hold.

Retractable Leashes

Retractable leashes feature a spring-loaded handle mechanism. This allows your dog to range away from you a bit before you press a button to stop the leash from unwinding. Retractable leashes work best with smaller dogs, as large dogs may be able to jerk the leash out of your hands too easily.

Training Leashes

Training leashes may be extra long or short, or made of special materials. You don’t need to use one unless directed to do so by a veterinary professional.

For further advice, call your vets Lafayette, LA.

Traveling By Car With Your Dog

It’s a good bet that you’ll have to travel with your dog in the car at one point or another, whether you’re going on a family vacation or a trip to the vet’s office. Below, your Glendale, AZ veterinarian offers a few tips for safe car travel.

Car Anxiety

Many dogs aren’t comfortable in the car, probably because it only ever takes them to the vet’s office. Try acclimating your dog to the car slowly by allowing him to explore it while the vehicle is still parked in the driveway. Go on frequent, short trips around the block or to a local park.

Use the Carrier

It’s always safest to keep your dog in their carrier while in the car, rather than letting them roam free. This will keep your dog as safe as possible if you have to brake quickly, and it prevents your dog from blocking your feet or obstructing your vision while driving.

Pit Stops

If you’re going on a longer journey by car, take frequent pit stops and allow your dog to get out of the car briefly. This will help combat carsickness and provide a bathroom-break opportunity. Call your animal hospital Glendale, AZ for more tips.

Your Cat’s Dietary Needs

One of the easiest and most effective ways to keep your cat healthy for a lifetime is to feed them a high-quality diet. Your cat’s nutritional needs vary widely as she ages, though. Here, your Rochester, NY veterinarian gives you a crash course.

Kittens

Newborn kittens will require their mother’s milk for proper nutrition, or a milk substitute if the mother’s milk isn’t available. Gradually, kittens will start eating wet food and then can be transitioned to dry kibble as they get a bit older. Ask your vet for further specifics.

Adult Cats

Your adult cat should be eating a well-balanced premium diet made for middle-aged animals. This will give them all of the essential vitamins, minerals, proteins, and other nutrients necessary for a long, healthy life. Ask your veterinarian to recommend a great food choice for your adult cat.

Senior Cats

By the time your cat is a senior, her nutritional needs are quite different than they used to be. All aging cats should be fed a senior-specific diet to get the right balance of nutrients; ask your vet for his or her opinion.

For more information regarding your cat’s dietary needs, contact your veterinarians Rochester, NY today.