Preparing Your Home or Apartment for a Puppy

Are you going to be bringing home a puppy soon? Be sure to prepare your home or apartment for the whirlwind that’s about to hit it! Here, your San Jose, CA veterinarian gives you a few tips on puppy-proofing.

Space Restrictions

Consider using dog gates or even baby gates to restrict your pup’s movements around your home at first. Not only will this keep him from becoming overwhelmed with an entire house to explore, it will make the area you have to keep safe and clean much smaller.

Hazard Check

Go through every room in your home that your new addition will be allowed into. Check for physical hazards like loose wires or electrical cords, tight spaces, sharp edges, and objects that could be swallowed or choked on. Remove these hazards to the best of your ability to make your home safe for Fido.

Remove Toxins

Remember that your home probably already contains a few potential pet toxins, such as toxic human foods, human medications, cleaning supplies, and pesticides. Poisonous indoor plants are also a possibility. Take steps to eliminate these hazards before bringing your puppy home.

Talk to your vet San Jose, CA professional for more puppy care tips.

The Basics of Catnip

Have you ever tried giving your feline friend catnip? Learn about the basics of catnip below from a Lafayette, LA veterinary professional.

What Exactly is Catnip?

Catnip is a naturally occurring herb in the same plant family as mint. It can be found all over the world, characterized in the wild by its white flowers with distinctive purple spots. The catnip you’ll find in a pet store is dried for consumer use, and looks much like greenish-brown oregano flakes.

Why Does Catnip Affect Cats?

The leaves, stem, and other parts of the catnip plant contain oils, and in these oils is a chemical compound known as nepetalactone. It is this substance that causes the reaction you see in cats; it’s essentially an aphrodisiac, and may cause cats to run around excitedly, rub their faces in the catnip, or simply relax in a state of euphoria.

Why Doesn’t My Cat Respond to Catnip?

Cats require a specific gene, inherited from their parents, to feel catnip’s effects. If your cat doesn’t respond to the herb, don’t worry—they just don’t have the right gene!

Talk to your animal hospital Lafayette, LA  for more information on catnip and your pet’s response to the herb.

Common Cat Toxins

Our feline friends are susceptible to household poisons, just like many other pets. Here, your Mt. Pleasant, SC veterinarian tells you about three of the most common offenders and how to avoid the trouble.

Cleaning Supplies

Everything from household disinfectants, toilet bowl cleaner, and carpet shampoo to bleach, furniture polish, and air freshener can harm a cat who manages to swallow it. Never allow your pet access to cleaning supplies, and move them elsewhere if you’re using something that gives off strong fumes.

Human Medications

Many human medicines—antidepressants, various NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), prescription pills, cough syrup, over-the-counter medications, and more—aren’t good for cats. Don’t leave your medicine cabinet open, and store your cat’s medications separately from your own.

Poisonous Plants

One of the most dangerous plant poisons out there for cats is the lily flower. In addition to lilies, plenty of other plant varieties like ivy, oleander, azalea/rhododendron, dieffenbachia, elephant ear, aloe plants, and the sago palm aren’t safe for cats. Check your home and landscaping for any dangerous plants and flowers, and remove them if necessary.

Want more advice on keeping your cat safe from common toxins? Call your vet in Vets Mt. Pleasant, SC a call.

Beware of These Backyard Pet Hazards

Spending time with your pet outdoors is a great experience for the both of you. Just make sure your animal friend stays safe from harm! Use these tips from a Fort Collins, CO veterinarian to do just that.

Pests and Parasites

Is your pet protected against the dangers of mosquitoes, ticks, fleas, and worms? This is an essential step in making your pet safe outdoors. Talk to your veterinarian to find out more about preventative topical or pill medications that ward off these critters.

Toxic Plant Life

There are plenty of toxic plants and flowers that pets shouldn’t ingest. The list includes the sago palm, various aloe plants, lilies, daffodils, tulips, dieffenbachia, elephant ear, ivy, and azalea, among many others. Ask your vet what sorts of toxic plants are most common in your area, and don’t let your pet go anywhere near them.

Heat, Humidity, and Sun

Make sure your pet has a shady spot to cool off under when spending time outdoors; pets are susceptible to heatstroke and heat exhaustion just like we are. Provide a dish of cool, fresh water at all times to prevent dehydration.

Does your pet need veterinary attention? Call your veterinarians Fort Collins, CO.

Maintaining Your Cat’s Dental Health

Did you know that dental problems are some of the most common health concerns that veterinarians treat amongst domesticated cats? It’s especially common in the senior cat population. Use these tips from a Greensboro, NC vet to maintain Fluffy’s dental health.

Watch for Behavioral Signs

Keep a close eye on your cat’s behavior. Cats suffering from dental disease, rotting teeth, or other ailments may shy away from attention, act out aggressively, vocalize loudly, refuse to eat, or eliminate in the house. Behavioral indicators like these may mean that your cat has a medical problem, so let your vet know.

Feed a Quality Diet

Good dental health—and overall well-being—starts with a good diet. Feed your cat a well-balanced feline food that is appropriate for her age, weight, and body condition. Ask your vet for a recommendation.

Visit the Vet

One of the best ways to maintain your cat’s dental health is by visiting your veterinarian on a regular basis. This way, your vet can check your cat’s dental well-being and treat any issues early on, before they’re allowed to get worse.

Set up an appointment today at your veterinary clinic Greensboro, NC for all of your cat’s healthcare needs.

Helping Your Cat Lose Weight

Is your cat overweight? Nearly half of all domesticated felines are! If your cat needs to lose weight, follow these guidelines from a Marietta, GA vet:

Portion Control

Portion control is essential for weight loss. Follow the directions on your cat’s food packaging, or talk to your veterinarian to get a recommendation on proper portion size. Don’t free-feed your cat; this is when food is left out constantly for cats to eat as they please. It’s a recipe for obesity!

Exercise

There’s no substitute for regular exercise when it comes to losing weight. Get your cat moving on a daily basis—use toys or a laser light to prompt her. Cat towers are also effective for allowing your cat to jump between platforms. Ask your vet about other great ways to give your cat a workout.

Treat Tips

Do you find yourself slipping Fluffy treats for no real reason? This is only providing empty calories. Try to give your cat treats only as a reward for good behavior, for training purposes, or as the very occasional indulgence.

If your cat needs help losing weight, call your Vet Marietta, GA to set up a weight-loss plan made specifically for her.

Picnic and Party Safety Tips for Pet Owners

Are you going to be including your pet in any picnics or parties in the near future? Remember that there are various hazards to consider. Learn more here from a North Phoenix, AZ veterinarian.

Watch the Food

Plenty of common picnic and party foods aren’t good for pets, including onions, garlic, chives, grapes, raisins, avocado, salty items like chips and pretzels, fatty foods, chocolate, candy, gum, and caffeine. Never leave such items within reach of your pet.

Watch the Drinks

Alcohol is very bad for our animal friends. It affects them the same way it affects us—the difference is that it only takes small amounts to result in organ damage. Keep a close eye on all alcoholic beverages to make sure that your pet doesn’t imbibe.

Heat and Sun

Summertime is prime-time for backyard picnics and parties. Allow your pet back indoors periodically to cool off in the air conditioning, and provide a large dish of cool, fresh water to drink from at all times. These measures will avoid the dangers of heatstroke and dehydration.

Your Pet Clinic North Phoenix, AZ is here to help with all of your pet care needs. Call the office today to make an appointment!

Common Backyard Pet Hazards

Taking your pet outdoors to do a little gardening with you? This sure can be a lot of fun, but make sure your animal friend stays safe. Here, your Livonia, MI veterinarian tells you more.

Outdoor Pests

Pests like fleas, ticks, mosquitoes, and parasitic worms love to latch on to our pets when the opportunity arises. If your pet isn’t wearing preventatives, they are at risk! Talk to your veterinarian to get your pet the preventative medications they need to ward off infection or infestation.

Poisonous Plant Life

Plenty of common plants and flowers aren’t good for pets, and some might be found in your backyard. Offenders include lilies, tulips, daffodils, chrysanthemum, dieffenbachia, elephant ear, azalea, certain aloe plants, the sago palm, and many more. Talk to your Livonia, MI veterinary professional to find out about poisonous or irritable plant life that is common in your area.

Fertilizers and Pesticides

Do you spray fertilizers on your lawn to promote growth, or pesticides on your garden plants to ward off bugs? Remember that these products aren’t safe for our animal companions. Keep pets inside when spraying chemicals, and don’t let them munch on plants or grass that has recently been treated. . Here, call your vet Livonia, MI tells you more.

Dairy and Our Feline Friends

It seems that dairy and cats just go together—it’s very easy to picture a cat happily lapping up milk from a saucer. Did you know that the two don’t actually mix? Learn more here from a Coon Rapids, MN veterinarian.

Why Can’t Cats Have Milk?

The vast majority of adult cats are lactose-intolerant, meaning that they can’t properly digest lactose, the primary enzyme found in milk. This is the same condition that affects many humans! When a cat drinks too much milk, they’re likely to experience an upset stomach, diarrhea, or vomiting.

What About Kittens?

You may wonder about kittens, who drink their mother’s milk during the nursing period. This is true, but it’s the only time in a cat’s life that milk is nutritionally necessary. Cats become gradually more and more lactose-intolerant as they age!

Is Any Dairy Safe?

Since yogurt, cheese, and other common forms of dairy contain less lactose than milk, they’re probably safer for cats. With that being said, it’s not worth the risk, as dairy isn’t a nutritional necessity for cats. If you must give Fluffy dairy, keep portions extremely small.

Contact your Vets Coon Rapids, MN for more information on feline dietary requirements.

How to Maintain Your Pet’s Health for a Lifetime

Who wouldn’t want to keep their beloved pet around for as long as possible? After all, our animal friends bring us years of unconditional love, loyalty, and joy. Use these tips from a vet in Thousand Oaks, CA to maintain your pet’s health for a lifetime:

Veterinary Visits

When your pet visits his or her veterinarian regularly, any health issues can be caught early on and treated before they’re allowed to develop into serious problems. Your vet can also advise you on maintaining your pet’s health moving forward. Most vets recommend they see your pet at least twice a year—make an appointment today.

Preventative Care

Make sure your pet stays up-to-date on all essential vaccinations against dangerous and contagious diseases. Also have them wear seasonal or year-round preventative medications to ward off ticks, fleas, worms, and mosquitoes. It’s far easier to prevent these problems initially them deal with them later!

Quality Diet

Your pet should be fed a high-quality diet that is appropriate for their age, weight, and breed. Ask your vet to recommend a good food for your animal companion.

Talk to your Vets Thousand Oaks, CA professional if you have further questions on keeping your pet healthy.