Can I Give My Cat Milk?

Have you ever given your feline friend milk? You might be surprised to find out that milk isn’t good for most cats! Here, your Orangevale, CA veterinarian tells you more.

Why Can’t Cats Drink Milk?

The majority of cats are actually lactose-intolerant, just like some humans are. This means that they don’t possess enough lactase in the gut to digest lactose, milk’s major enzyme. Drinking too much milk will surely result in an upset stomach, if not diarrhea and vomiting. It’s not worth the risk!

Don’t Kittens Need Milk?

Yes, kittens require their mother’s milk (or a formula substitute if the mother isn’t around) when they’re young. This is the only time in a cat’s life, though, that they’ll need milk of any kind. As kittens grow, they produce less and less lactase, becoming lactose-intolerant by the time they’re adults.

Is Other Dairy Safe for Cats?

Because other forms of dairy like yogurt and cheese contain smaller amounts of lactose than milk, they’re a bit safer for cats. They’re not nutritionally necessary in the least, though—it’s safest to avoid giving your cat dairy of any kind.

Talk to your Vets Orangevale, CA for more information on your cat’s diet.

Pet Toxins in the Home

Were you aware that many pet toxins are already in your home? Fortunately, it just takes some awareness to keep your animal friend safe. Learn about three common offenders here from an Oshawa, ON veterinarian.

Human Foods

There are plenty of human foods, many of which are already in your kitchen, that pets shouldn’t eat. They include onions, garlic, chives, shallots, avocado, chocolate, candy, gum, grapes, raisins, salt, macadamia nuts, fatty foods, caffeine, alcohol, and more. Never leave anything harmful within your pet’s reach!

Cleaning Supplies

Anything from bleach and household disinfectants to furniture polish and toilet bowl cleaner can harm a pet who ingests too much. Never leave your supply closet door open to allow pets access to the products inside. Move your animal companion elsewhere when using chemicals that give off strong fumes.

Human Medication

Did you know that antidepressants, cough syrup, prescription drugs, over-the-counter medications, and even aspirin can poison pets? Don’t leave medicine bottles within your pet’s reach, and keep your medicine cabinet closed tightly at all times.

These aren’t the only pet poisons out there. To find out more about keeping your pet safe within the walls of your home, call your Animal Hospital Oshawa, ON.

What to Do if Your Pet is Smelly

Is your pet a bit odorous? Perhaps it’s time to freshen him up! Use these tips from a London, ON veterinarian to get your pet smelling great again.

Grooming

Brush your pet daily; not only will this remove loose and dead fur from the coat, it spreads essential skin oils throughout the fur to moisturize it naturally. The occasional bath, using a canine- or feline-formulated shampoo for maximum effect, can also cut down on odors significantly.

Odor Neutralizers

Air fresheners simply mask smells, allowing them to return over time. Odor neutralizer products, though, combat the enzymes that cause odors at their root, eliminating them for good. Pick up a pet-specific odor neutralizer at your local pet store or retail outlet.

Veterinary Visit

If you still can’t seem to get your pet’s smell under control, it’s time to see the vet. It is possible that skin conditions, infections, infestations, or other medical issues could be the cause of your pet’s odor. These problems will likely require professional veterinary care to correct.

Would you like more information on grooming your pet? Does your animal friend need an examination or vaccinations? Set up an appointment today to see your veterinarians London, ON professional.

Caring for Your Dog’s Coat

Did you know that one of the best indicators of a dog’s internal health is their coat? If your canine companion’s fur is looking a little lackluster, use these tips from a Greenville, SC veterinarian to spruce it up.

Brushing

Brushing your dog’s coat regularly is one of the best ways to keep him looking and feeling his best. Not only does brushing remove loose and dead fur from the coat, it spreads essential skin oils through the hair, keeping it moisturized naturally. Pick up a canine-specific brush at your local pet store.

Bathing

The occasional bath using a canine-formulated shampoo is another good way to keep Fido’s coat clean and fresh. Be careful not to overdo it, though. Bathing too frequently can actually backfire, drying out the skin and leading to more shedding and an unhealthy, coarse coat.

Diet Tips

What goes into your dog is very important for how he looks on the outside. Feed your pooch a high-quality, nutritionally balanced diet that is appropriate for his age, weight, breed, and overall health. Ask your veterinary professional to recommend a great food choice.

Does your canine companion need veterinary attention? Call your Vet Greenville, SC for help.

Rescue Dog Myths

Don’t believe everything you hear about adopting a dog from a rescue facility—there are plenty of misconceptions floating around! Your Minnetonka, MN veterinarian sets the record straight below.

Shelter Dogs Are Poorly Behaved

This couldn’t be further from the truth. Dogs aren’t relinquished to shelters solely because of poor behavior. Even dogs who do have behavioral issues are worked with closely by the shelter staff to improve their mannerisms.

Shelter Dogs Are Dirty

Think shelters, as well as the dogs housed inside of them, are dirty? Think again! Shelters must be kept to a high standard of cleanliness to prevent the spread of disease, so the dogs found in shelters aren’t dirty. Shelter staff members work diligently to keep everything clean.

Shelters Only Have Mutts

Don’t make the mistake of thinking that every dog in a rescue facility or shelter is a mixed-breed. In fact, you’re just as likely to find a purebred animal in a shelter; it all depends on chance. If you have your heart set on a particular breed of dog, tour your local shelters first before visiting a breeder or pet shop.

Talk to your veterinarian Minnetonka, MN professional for more information on dog adoption.

Preventative Healthcare Basics for Your Pet

Preventative healthcare is not only smarter and cheaper than treatment, it’s more effective for your pet’s well-being over time. Here, your Hinesville, GA veterinarian tells you about three important preventative measures that you should take.

Vaccination

All cats and dogs should be vaccinated against dangerous diseases like parvovirus, distemper, feline leukemia, parainfluenza, hepatitis, calicivirus, and rabies. Most pets get these shots when they’re as young as six weeks old. Talk to your veterinarian if your animal friend still needs vaccinated.

Pest Prevention

It’s much easier to prevent the dangerous of ticks, fleas, mosquitoes, and worms like heartworm and roundworm initially, rather than deal with a troublesome infestation or infection after the fact. Set your pet up with seasonal or year-round preventive medications to ward off these critters. Ask your vet for help if your pet doesn’t already have these safety measures in place.

Veterinary Visits

Of course, keeping regular appointments at your vet’s office is another great preventative healthcare measures. When your veterinary professional sees your four-legged friend regularly, he or she can catch any problems early and treat them before they can develop further. Make an appointment to see your vets Hinesville, GA today. Your pet will thank you!

Combating Your Dog’s Thunderstorm Anxiety

Many dogs don’t like thunderstorms—the loud booms and bright flashes simply terrify them! It’s also possible that dogs can sense air pressure changes that make them even more anxious. Combat thunderstorm anxiety with these tips from a Glendale, AZ veterinarian:

Clothing

Did you know that storm jackets are made just for the needs of dogs? Many dogs feel much more comfortable when wrapped in these items. Head to a local pet store to pick one up, and try asking for a recommendation from your veterinarian.

Safe Zone

Set up a safe zone in a quiet basement or back bedroom, complete with a comfortable pet bed, several plush blankets, and a few of your dog’s favorite toys. Lead your pooch to this area, perhaps wearing the storm jacket at the same time, to wait out the storm.

Desensitization

Talk to your veterinarian about a desensitization program. This involves playing recordings of thunderstorms at a low volume, then gradually increasing the volume over time. This process can desensitize your dog to the sounds of storms, making him less anxious when the real thing comes around.

Do you need help dealing with your canine companion’s anxiety? Call your veterinarians Glendale, AZ office.

Milk, Dairy, and Our Housecats

For whatever reason, cats and milk just seem to pair together. Believe it or not, the two don’t mix! Learn more below from a vet in Myakka, FL.

Why Shouldn’t Cats Have Milk?

Most adult cats are lactose-intolerant, meaning that they can’t properly digest lactose, the primary enzyme of milk and other dairy foods. This is the same condition that many humans suffer from! When a cat drinks too much milk, an upset stomach, vomiting, or diarrhea is likely to result.

Don’t Kittens Need Milk?

Yes, kittens require milk from their mother or a milk-formula substitute when they are young. This is the only time in a cat’s life, however, that milk is necessary. Cats generally grow more and more lactose-intolerant as they age, and won’t take kindly to milk once they’re fully grown.

What About Other Dairy?

Since other dairy products—yogurt, cheese, etc.—contain less lactose than pure milk, they may not cause problems as quickly as milk does. However, dairy is not a nutritional necessity for any adult cat. Keep the portion size extremely small if you must give your cat a dairy treat!

Contact your Vet Myakka, FL for more information on your cat’s dietary needs.

Your Cat’s Tail Communications

Did you know that one of the primary ways that cats communicate (aside from vocalizations, which they use almost exclusively for us!) is by the tail? Learn about your cat’s tail communications below from an Ellicott City, MD vet.

 

Flagpole Position

Have you ever seen your cat hold the tail straight up in a rigid manner? Some refer to this position as the “flagpole.” It means that your cat is feeling self-assured and confident.

 

The Curve

When a cat holds the tail in a gentle curve, it usually means that your cat is feeling amused and playful. Some say the tail looks almost like a question mark in this position. Oblige your feline friend—give her some toys or a vigorous petting session.

 

The Wrap

Cats often wrap their tails around their owners’ legs as they pass by. Some cats have even been known to wrap the tail around other cats. This is similar to the way we wrap an arm around a loved one; it’s your cat’s way of showing she cares!

 

Remember that all cats are different; your cat may have her own unique personality and communication quirks. Talk to your veterinarians Ellicott City, MD for more information.

Beach Safety for Pets

Taking your pet to the beach sure is a lot of fun. It’s important, though, to keep a few safety precautions in mind! Learn more below from a vet in Leesburg, VA.

Heat and Sun Protection

For pets, the major danger of the beach is the scorching heat and sun. Provide a dish of cool, fresh water for your animal friend to drink from at all times; this will stave off dehydration. Also make sure to bring a beach umbrella to provide shade. You can even consider applying a feline- or canine-formulated sunscreen.

Water Safety

If your pet ventures into the ocean, always go in with them. Never go out more than a few feet; even dogs who are experienced swimmers can be taken off guard by the ocean’s currents. Some pets benefit from floatation devices; ask your vet to recommend such a product.

The Final Rinse

When your beach day is over, be sure to give your pet’s coat a thorough rinse with fresh water from the garden hose or bathtub. Leaving salt water or sand in the fur is only inviting irritation, dry skin, and other troubles.

Ask your vet Leesburg, VA can give you further advice—call today!