Category Archives: Pets Care

Pocket Pet Dental Care

Do you own a pocket pet? For your guinea pig, hamster, gerbil, rat, or mouse, dental care is of great importance. Use these tips from your Livonia, MI vet to keep your furry friend’s oral health in peak condition.

Quality Diet

Great dental health starts with a great diet. Make sure your pocket pet is eating a high-quality commercial diet; don’t be afraid to ask your veterinarian to recommend a particular type and brand. Many pocket pets’ diets should also be supplemented with fresh fruits and veggies, so make sure you’re doing so.

Chew Toys

Chew toys give your pocket pet something to gnaw on besides the wire mesh of the cage, which could potentially fracture or break teeth. Provide your pet with plenty of pocket-pet-safe chew toys.

Veterinary Visits

Don’t forget about regular veterinary visits—the best way to keep your pet’s dental heath in check is to let the professionals take care of it! When your veterinarian sees your pet regularly, he or she can catch any problems early on, before they’re allowed to develop into more serious health issues. Set up an appointment at your Livonia, MI veterinary clinic today if your animal friend needs an exam.

Vaccination 101

Vaccination is an essential part of your pet’s health. If you’re new to pet ownership, you may not be familiar with the ins and outs of vaccines. Here, your Indianapolis, IN vet goes over the basics.

How Do Vaccines Work?

Vaccines introduce a small strain of a virus, called an antigen, to your pet’s immune system. In response, your pet’s system develops antibodies. This way, your pet’s body is prepared to recognize, lessen the symptoms of, and in some cases fight off the disease entirely should the real thing ever come along later in life.

What Vaccines Does My Pet Need?

Your pet needs the core vaccines, and these may have already been administered when your pet was young. Core vaccines include those that protect against distemper, calicivirus, rabies, parvovirus, and other serious and contagious diseases. Non-core vaccines aren’t essential for every pet, but they may be helpful for some based on exposure risk and other factors. Talk to your veterinarian for more details on the particular vaccines your pet needs.

How Do I Get Started?

Make an appointment at your Indianapolis, IN vet’s office if you have questions about your pet’s vaccinations or if your pet needs booster shots.

Xylitol and Pets: A Deadly Combination

Xylitol is an artificial sweetener that is used in many candies, gums, and certain baked goods. The substance is fine for human consumption, but it can prove deadly for our animal friends. Learn more here from your North Phoenix, AZ veterinarian.

Symptoms

The symptoms of xylitol poisoning—which usually appear within 30 minutes of ingestion—include weakness, disorientation, vomiting, and diarrhea. Without treatment, a pet may experience seizures, coma, and even death.

Treatment

Rush your pet to your local veterinary emergency room if you see or suspect that they’ve eaten a xylitol product. Your veterinarian may flush the stomach or administer activated charcoal to slow the poison’s absorption. IV fluid therapy, electrolyte replacement, oxygen supplementation, and other supportive treatments may be necessary as your pet recovers.

Preventing Poisoning

Of course, it’s far easier to prevent poisoning in the first place than deal with an episode. Luckily, it’s as simple as restricting your pet’s access to products that contain xylitol—never leave candies, gum, or baked goods out on countertops or tables where pets may be able to reach them. Store them inside closed containers or cabinets instead.

Ask your veterinarians North Phoenix, AZ for more information on xylitol and pets.

Your Home Already Contains These Pet Poisons

That’s right, you’ve already got these potential pet poisons in your home. Not to fear, though—it just takes awareness and precautionary measures to keep your four-legged friend safe. Learn more here from your vet in Marietta, GA.

Toxic Foods

Plenty of human foods can poison a pet! The list includes onions, garlic, chives, grapes, raisins, chocolate, candy, gum, avocado, alcohol, caffeine, salt, and more. It’s important to never leave harmful foods out on the countertops or table where pets could swipe them down.

Human Medication

Did you know that a variety of human medicines—everything from aspirin, cough syrup, and antidepressants to prescription pills and over-the-counter medications—can harm a pet if they ingest too much? Keep your medicine cabinet sealed tight at all times, and store your own medications and those of your pet separately so as not to mix them up.

Cleaning Supplies

Your supply closet contains all sorts of potentially harmful chemicals, from bleach and ammonia to household disinfectants, floor cleaner, and wood polish. Close and lock your supply closet when you’re not using the products inside, and keep your pet elsewhere if you’re using harmful chemicals.

Call your Marietta, GA veterinarian’s office for further advice.

Assembling Your Pet’s Emergency Kit

The best way to deal with an emergency situation is to be prepared for it ahead of time. When it comes to your pet, one of the best ways to do that is with an emergency kit. Here, your Myrtle Beach vet tells you what to include.

First-Aid Items

Most of your kit will be comprised of first-aid essentials like gauze, bandages, adhesive tape, tweezers, scissors, a disinfectant solution, a pet thermometer, nail clippers, etc. Also include a few pairs of latex gloves to protect your hands.

Essential Phone Numbers

It’s a good idea to make a list of essential phone numbers and include them in your kit; this way, you always know exactly where they are. Phone numbers to include are those of your vet’s office, any nearby emergency hospitals, and animal shelters in your area.

Medical Records

It’s important to pack your pet’s medical records in your kit—these can be literal lifesavers in an emergency situation. In a water-proof bag, put your pet’s proof of vaccinations, proof of ownership, a recent picture, and records of any recent medical work or chronic conditions.

Want more advice on building your pet’s emergency kit? Contact your veterinarians Myrtle Beach.

Keep Your Pet Away from These In-Home Toxins

Did you know that just about every home already contains some—if not all—of the following pet poisons? Don’t worry, though; all it takes to keep your pet safe is a few simple precautions. Your Orangevale, CA veterinarian elaborates below.

Human Medication

Many human medicines, from aspirin and antidepressants to prescription pills and cough syrup, aren’t good for pets. Never leave any of your medications out on countertops or tables where pets may be able to swipe them down. Remember: child-proof plastic caps are no match for a pet with strong jaws!

Poisonous Plant Life

There is a long list of potentially poisonous plants and flowers that may be found in your home. They include lilies, tulips, daffodils, ivy, oleander, elephant ear, certain aloe plant varieties, the sago palm, poinsettias, and more. Ask your vet what sorts of toxic plants are common in your area, and remove them from your home or garden immediately.

Toxic Foods

Plenty of human foods—chocolate, candy, grapes and raisins, onions, garlic, avocado, alcohol, and many more—are very bad for pets. Never let your animal companion gain access; store harmful foods safely in the refrigerator.

Call your animal hospital Orangevale, CA for more information.

Three Reasons to Get Your Pet a Microchip

Have you ever heard of microchips for pets? They’re the best way to keep your four-legged friend identified, and they’re becoming more popular every day. Learn about just three of microchips’ many benefits below from a Warminster, PA vet.

Secure Identification

Some pets may be able to chew through, slip off, or rip away a collar containing ID tags. With a microchip, you don’t have this worry; the chip is implanted under your pet’s skin and cannot be removed unless a veterinary professional does so.

Easy to Have Updated

If you move or change your telephone number, you’ll have to get new ID tags. If your pet has a microchip, you don’t even have to leave home to update it! Simply contact the microchip manufacturer, and they’ll update your pet’s information in their database instantly.

Quick, Painless, and Inexpensive

The microchipping procedure only takes a few moments, and your pet won’t feel any pain—the chip itself is inserted with a specialized syringe, and the whole process is very much like a vaccination. In addition, microchips aren’t expensive, usually ranging between $25 and $75.

Does your pet need properly identified? Set up an appointment at your Warminster, PA animal hospital.

Three Pet Poisons That May Already Be in Your Home

That’s right, the following pet toxins may already reside in your home. Don’t worry, though—all it takes is a few precautionary measures to keep your four-legged companion safe from harm. Your Olathe, KS veterinarian elaborates below.

Toxic Plants and Flowers

The list of potentially hazardous plants and flowers is quite long. It includes lilies, dieffenbachia, elephant ear, certain aloe plants, the sago palm, oleander, poinsettias, chrysanthemums, daffodils, and even tulips. Remove any and all hazardous plant life from your home or garden if your pet is the type to nibble.

Human Foods

Plenty of human foods—chocolate, candy, grapes and raisins, onions, garlic, alcohol, caffeine, salt, and more—aren’t safe for pets. Never leave harmful substances out on countertops or tables where pets may be able to reach them.

Human Medications

Did you know that everything from aspirin and cough syrup to prescription pills and anti-depressants can harm a pet if they were to ingest too much? It’s important to keep your medicine cabinet tightly sealed at all times. Remember: a pet with strong jaws might be able to chew right through a flimsy plastic cap!

Call your veterinarian Olathe, KS to find out about other potential pet toxins.

Cats, Milk, and Dairy Products

Cats and milk just seem to go together. You may be surprised to learn that the two actually don’t mix! Learn more here from your vet in Ellicott City, MD.

Why Can’t Cats Drink Milk?

The majority of adult cats are lactose-intolerant, meaning that they don’t possess enough lactase in the digestive system to digest lactose, the primary enzyme of milk. Drinking too much milk will likely cause an upset stomach, diarrhea, or even vomiting.

What About Kittens?

Kittens drink their mother’s milk while nursing, yes. This is, however, the only time in a cat’s life cycle that milk is a nutritional necessity. As most cats age, they produce less lactase. By the time they’re fully grown, most cats are totally lactose-intolerant.

Is Other Dairy Okay?

Since other forms of dairy like yogurt or cheese generally contain less lactase than milk, they may be safer to feed to your feline friend. Still, it’s important not to go overboard. It’s safer to stick to cat treats or small bits of cooked meat instead—your cat will probably like these items more anyway!

Do you have questions about your cat’s diet or nutrition? Contact your animal hospital Ellicott City, MD for help.

How Do You Tell When Your Bird is Sick?

If you’re a bird owner, it’s up to you to know when your feathered friend isn’t feeling up to snuff. Here, your North Phoenix, AZ veterinary professional gives you a crash course in some of the most common signs of illness in birds.

Cere Trouble

Your bird’s cere is the area above the beak that houses the nostrils; think of it as your bird’s nose. If you see discharge coming from this area, or if you notice crusts, redness, inflammation, or anything else out of the ordinary, it’s time to notify your vet.

Ruffled Feathers

While birds do ruffle their feathers normally, they don’t typically keep them ruffled for long periods of time. If you’ve noticed that your bird has kept the feathers ruffled for a full day or longer, a trip to the vet’s office is in order.

Loss of Appetite

Like many other pets, a loss of appetite isn’t healthy in birds. If you’re noticing a lot of leftover food in your feathered companion’s bowl recently, tell your veterinarian. Everything from illness to infection to injury could be to blame.

Set up an appointment with your veterinary clinic North Phoenix, AZ if your bird needs prompt veterinary attention.