Category Archives: Pets Care

Beach Safety for Pets

Taking your pet to the beach sure is a lot of fun. It’s important, though, to keep a few safety precautions in mind! Learn more below from a vet in Leesburg, VA.

Heat and Sun Protection

For pets, the major danger of the beach is the scorching heat and sun. Provide a dish of cool, fresh water for your animal friend to drink from at all times; this will stave off dehydration. Also make sure to bring a beach umbrella to provide shade. You can even consider applying a feline- or canine-formulated sunscreen.

Water Safety

If your pet ventures into the ocean, always go in with them. Never go out more than a few feet; even dogs who are experienced swimmers can be taken off guard by the ocean’s currents. Some pets benefit from floatation devices; ask your vet to recommend such a product.

The Final Rinse

When your beach day is over, be sure to give your pet’s coat a thorough rinse with fresh water from the garden hose or bathtub. Leaving salt water or sand in the fur is only inviting irritation, dry skin, and other troubles.

Ask your vet Leesburg, VA can give you further advice—call today!

The Basics of Catnip

Have you ever tried giving your feline friend catnip? Learn about the basics of catnip below from a Lafayette, LA veterinary professional.

What Exactly is Catnip?

Catnip is a naturally occurring herb in the same plant family as mint. It can be found all over the world, characterized in the wild by its white flowers with distinctive purple spots. The catnip you’ll find in a pet store is dried for consumer use, and looks much like greenish-brown oregano flakes.

Why Does Catnip Affect Cats?

The leaves, stem, and other parts of the catnip plant contain oils, and in these oils is a chemical compound known as nepetalactone. It is this substance that causes the reaction you see in cats; it’s essentially an aphrodisiac, and may cause cats to run around excitedly, rub their faces in the catnip, or simply relax in a state of euphoria.

Why Doesn’t My Cat Respond to Catnip?

Cats require a specific gene, inherited from their parents, to feel catnip’s effects. If your cat doesn’t respond to the herb, don’t worry—they just don’t have the right gene!

Talk to your animal hospital Lafayette, LA  for more information on catnip and your pet’s response to the herb.

Beware of These Backyard Pet Hazards

Spending time with your pet outdoors is a great experience for the both of you. Just make sure your animal friend stays safe from harm! Use these tips from a Fort Collins, CO veterinarian to do just that.

Pests and Parasites

Is your pet protected against the dangers of mosquitoes, ticks, fleas, and worms? This is an essential step in making your pet safe outdoors. Talk to your veterinarian to find out more about preventative topical or pill medications that ward off these critters.

Toxic Plant Life

There are plenty of toxic plants and flowers that pets shouldn’t ingest. The list includes the sago palm, various aloe plants, lilies, daffodils, tulips, dieffenbachia, elephant ear, ivy, and azalea, among many others. Ask your vet what sorts of toxic plants are most common in your area, and don’t let your pet go anywhere near them.

Heat, Humidity, and Sun

Make sure your pet has a shady spot to cool off under when spending time outdoors; pets are susceptible to heatstroke and heat exhaustion just like we are. Provide a dish of cool, fresh water at all times to prevent dehydration.

Does your pet need veterinary attention? Call your veterinarians Fort Collins, CO.

Picnic and Party Safety Tips for Pet Owners

Are you going to be including your pet in any picnics or parties in the near future? Remember that there are various hazards to consider. Learn more here from a North Phoenix, AZ veterinarian.

Watch the Food

Plenty of common picnic and party foods aren’t good for pets, including onions, garlic, chives, grapes, raisins, avocado, salty items like chips and pretzels, fatty foods, chocolate, candy, gum, and caffeine. Never leave such items within reach of your pet.

Watch the Drinks

Alcohol is very bad for our animal friends. It affects them the same way it affects us—the difference is that it only takes small amounts to result in organ damage. Keep a close eye on all alcoholic beverages to make sure that your pet doesn’t imbibe.

Heat and Sun

Summertime is prime-time for backyard picnics and parties. Allow your pet back indoors periodically to cool off in the air conditioning, and provide a large dish of cool, fresh water to drink from at all times. These measures will avoid the dangers of heatstroke and dehydration.

Your Pet Clinic North Phoenix, AZ is here to help with all of your pet care needs. Call the office today to make an appointment!

Common Backyard Pet Hazards

Taking your pet outdoors to do a little gardening with you? This sure can be a lot of fun, but make sure your animal friend stays safe. Here, your Livonia, MI veterinarian tells you more.

Outdoor Pests

Pests like fleas, ticks, mosquitoes, and parasitic worms love to latch on to our pets when the opportunity arises. If your pet isn’t wearing preventatives, they are at risk! Talk to your veterinarian to get your pet the preventative medications they need to ward off infection or infestation.

Poisonous Plant Life

Plenty of common plants and flowers aren’t good for pets, and some might be found in your backyard. Offenders include lilies, tulips, daffodils, chrysanthemum, dieffenbachia, elephant ear, azalea, certain aloe plants, the sago palm, and many more. Talk to your Livonia, MI veterinary professional to find out about poisonous or irritable plant life that is common in your area.

Fertilizers and Pesticides

Do you spray fertilizers on your lawn to promote growth, or pesticides on your garden plants to ward off bugs? Remember that these products aren’t safe for our animal companions. Keep pets inside when spraying chemicals, and don’t let them munch on plants or grass that has recently been treated. . Here, call your vet Livonia, MI tells you more.

Dairy and Our Feline Friends

It seems that dairy and cats just go together—it’s very easy to picture a cat happily lapping up milk from a saucer. Did you know that the two don’t actually mix? Learn more here from a Coon Rapids, MN veterinarian.

Why Can’t Cats Have Milk?

The vast majority of adult cats are lactose-intolerant, meaning that they can’t properly digest lactose, the primary enzyme found in milk. This is the same condition that affects many humans! When a cat drinks too much milk, they’re likely to experience an upset stomach, diarrhea, or vomiting.

What About Kittens?

You may wonder about kittens, who drink their mother’s milk during the nursing period. This is true, but it’s the only time in a cat’s life that milk is nutritionally necessary. Cats become gradually more and more lactose-intolerant as they age!

Is Any Dairy Safe?

Since yogurt, cheese, and other common forms of dairy contain less lactose than milk, they’re probably safer for cats. With that being said, it’s not worth the risk, as dairy isn’t a nutritional necessity for cats. If you must give Fluffy dairy, keep portions extremely small.

Contact your Vets Coon Rapids, MN for more information on feline dietary requirements.

How to Maintain Your Pet’s Health for a Lifetime

Who wouldn’t want to keep their beloved pet around for as long as possible? After all, our animal friends bring us years of unconditional love, loyalty, and joy. Use these tips from a vet in Thousand Oaks, CA to maintain your pet’s health for a lifetime:

Veterinary Visits

When your pet visits his or her veterinarian regularly, any health issues can be caught early on and treated before they’re allowed to develop into serious problems. Your vet can also advise you on maintaining your pet’s health moving forward. Most vets recommend they see your pet at least twice a year—make an appointment today.

Preventative Care

Make sure your pet stays up-to-date on all essential vaccinations against dangerous and contagious diseases. Also have them wear seasonal or year-round preventative medications to ward off ticks, fleas, worms, and mosquitoes. It’s far easier to prevent these problems initially them deal with them later!

Quality Diet

Your pet should be fed a high-quality diet that is appropriate for their age, weight, and breed. Ask your vet to recommend a good food for your animal companion.

Talk to your Vets Thousand Oaks, CA professional if you have further questions on keeping your pet healthy.

Backyard Pet Hazards

It can be a lot of fun to spend time in the backyard with your beloved pet. Of course, it’s important to keep your animal companion’s safety in mind! Here, your Myrtle Beach vet discusses three common backyard pet hazards.

Pesticides and Fertilizer

Do you use pesticides on your garden to keep the bugs away? Fertilizer on your lawn to help it grow? Remember that these products can poison a pet if they manage to ingest them. Keep pets indoors when spraying chemicals, and don’t let your animal friend nibble on treated plant life.

Poisonous Plant Life

There are plenty of harmful plants and flowers out there, including lilies, tulips, daffodils, chrysanthemums, elephant ear, dieffenbachia, the sago palm, various aloe plants, poinsettias, and more. Check your garden and landscaping, and remove any offenders right away.

Gardening Tools

Leaving sharp gardening tools—rakes, tillers, shovels, hedge trimmers, clippers, hoes, etc.—lying about in the grass is a recipe for disaster. Both pets and human family members can trip or cut themselves, so put all tools back in the garage or shed where they belong.

Does your pet need veterinary attention? Call your animal hospital Myrtle Beach for help from the professionals.

Is a Reptile Pet Right for Your Family?

Are you considering adopting a reptile? It’s important to be aware of a few considerations before bringing your scaled friend home. Learn more below from your Myakka, FL vet.

Specialized Diet

Keep in mind that reptiles require special diets; some need live food given to them in the cage. Many lizards require crickets. If you’re squeamish about this sort of thing, you’ll probably want to reconsider owning that particular reptile. Ask your veterinarian for specifics about your potential pet’s diet.

Heating and Lighting Requirements

Most reptiles need specialized heat and lighting implements (lamps, heating pads, etc.) to stay healthy. Be sure to factor these items into the initial and ongoing cost of owning your pet.

Allergy Benefits

One of the great benefits of reptile pets is that they’re usually completely hypoallergenic. If you or a member of your family suffers from allergies to pet dander, you won’t have to worry about your reptile friend making you itch. Oftentimes, reptile pets are the answer for families with allergy sufferers!

Call your pet clinic Myakka, FL is here to answer any further questions you may have regarding the care and maintenance of reptile pets. Call the office today to speak with a veterinary professional.

Myths About Shelter Pets

 

Are you considering adopting a pet from a shelter? It’s important to separate misconceptions from reality, as shelter pets are often misunderstood! Learn more here from your Wake Forest, NC veterinarian.

Shelter Pets Are Poorly Behaved

This isn’t true, and is based on the assumption that a pet is relinquished to a shelter because of poor behavior. The truth is, pets come to shelters for a variety of reasons; poor behavior is not a common one. The majority of pets in shelters are perfectly well-behaved and are just looking for a good home!

Shelter Pets Are Old

This couldn’t be further from the truth—shelter pets are not all elderly animals abandoned by their owners. Pets of all ages, including puppies and kittens, middle-aged animals, and elderly pets, can be found in shelters.

Shelter Pets Are All Mixed Breeds

Some may think that all shelter pets are mixed breeds, but this isn’t true. Purebred animals can be found in shelters, too. Visit your local shelters before visiting a pet store or a breeder; you just might find your next furry family member!

Do you have questions about the adoption process? Call your vets Wake Forest, NC for more information.