Category Archives: Pets Care

Your Home Already Contains These Pet Poisons

That’s right, you’ve already got these potential pet poisons in your home. Not to fear, though—it just takes awareness and precautionary measures to keep your four-legged friend safe. Learn more here from your vet in Marietta, GA.

Toxic Foods

Plenty of human foods can poison a pet! The list includes onions, garlic, chives, grapes, raisins, chocolate, candy, gum, avocado, alcohol, caffeine, salt, and more. It’s important to never leave harmful foods out on the countertops or table where pets could swipe them down.

Human Medication

Did you know that a variety of human medicines—everything from aspirin, cough syrup, and antidepressants to prescription pills and over-the-counter medications—can harm a pet if they ingest too much? Keep your medicine cabinet sealed tight at all times, and store your own medications and those of your pet separately so as not to mix them up.

Cleaning Supplies

Your supply closet contains all sorts of potentially harmful chemicals, from bleach and ammonia to household disinfectants, floor cleaner, and wood polish. Close and lock your supply closet when you’re not using the products inside, and keep your pet elsewhere if you’re using harmful chemicals.

Call your Marietta, GA veterinarian’s office for further advice.

Assembling Your Pet’s Emergency Kit

The best way to deal with an emergency situation is to be prepared for it ahead of time. When it comes to your pet, one of the best ways to do that is with an emergency kit. Here, your Myrtle Beach vet tells you what to include.

First-Aid Items

Most of your kit will be comprised of first-aid essentials like gauze, bandages, adhesive tape, tweezers, scissors, a disinfectant solution, a pet thermometer, nail clippers, etc. Also include a few pairs of latex gloves to protect your hands.

Essential Phone Numbers

It’s a good idea to make a list of essential phone numbers and include them in your kit; this way, you always know exactly where they are. Phone numbers to include are those of your vet’s office, any nearby emergency hospitals, and animal shelters in your area.

Medical Records

It’s important to pack your pet’s medical records in your kit—these can be literal lifesavers in an emergency situation. In a water-proof bag, put your pet’s proof of vaccinations, proof of ownership, a recent picture, and records of any recent medical work or chronic conditions.

Want more advice on building your pet’s emergency kit? Contact your veterinarians Myrtle Beach.

Keep Your Pet Away from These In-Home Toxins

Did you know that just about every home already contains some—if not all—of the following pet poisons? Don’t worry, though; all it takes to keep your pet safe is a few simple precautions. Your Orangevale, CA veterinarian elaborates below.

Human Medication

Many human medicines, from aspirin and antidepressants to prescription pills and cough syrup, aren’t good for pets. Never leave any of your medications out on countertops or tables where pets may be able to swipe them down. Remember: child-proof plastic caps are no match for a pet with strong jaws!

Poisonous Plant Life

There is a long list of potentially poisonous plants and flowers that may be found in your home. They include lilies, tulips, daffodils, ivy, oleander, elephant ear, certain aloe plant varieties, the sago palm, poinsettias, and more. Ask your vet what sorts of toxic plants are common in your area, and remove them from your home or garden immediately.

Toxic Foods

Plenty of human foods—chocolate, candy, grapes and raisins, onions, garlic, avocado, alcohol, and many more—are very bad for pets. Never let your animal companion gain access; store harmful foods safely in the refrigerator.

Call your animal hospital Orangevale, CA for more information.

Three Reasons to Get Your Pet a Microchip

Have you ever heard of microchips for pets? They’re the best way to keep your four-legged friend identified, and they’re becoming more popular every day. Learn about just three of microchips’ many benefits below from a Warminster, PA vet.

Secure Identification

Some pets may be able to chew through, slip off, or rip away a collar containing ID tags. With a microchip, you don’t have this worry; the chip is implanted under your pet’s skin and cannot be removed unless a veterinary professional does so.

Easy to Have Updated

If you move or change your telephone number, you’ll have to get new ID tags. If your pet has a microchip, you don’t even have to leave home to update it! Simply contact the microchip manufacturer, and they’ll update your pet’s information in their database instantly.

Quick, Painless, and Inexpensive

The microchipping procedure only takes a few moments, and your pet won’t feel any pain—the chip itself is inserted with a specialized syringe, and the whole process is very much like a vaccination. In addition, microchips aren’t expensive, usually ranging between $25 and $75.

Does your pet need properly identified? Set up an appointment at your Warminster, PA animal hospital.

Three Pet Poisons That May Already Be in Your Home

That’s right, the following pet toxins may already reside in your home. Don’t worry, though—all it takes is a few precautionary measures to keep your four-legged companion safe from harm. Your Olathe, KS veterinarian elaborates below.

Toxic Plants and Flowers

The list of potentially hazardous plants and flowers is quite long. It includes lilies, dieffenbachia, elephant ear, certain aloe plants, the sago palm, oleander, poinsettias, chrysanthemums, daffodils, and even tulips. Remove any and all hazardous plant life from your home or garden if your pet is the type to nibble.

Human Foods

Plenty of human foods—chocolate, candy, grapes and raisins, onions, garlic, alcohol, caffeine, salt, and more—aren’t safe for pets. Never leave harmful substances out on countertops or tables where pets may be able to reach them.

Human Medications

Did you know that everything from aspirin and cough syrup to prescription pills and anti-depressants can harm a pet if they were to ingest too much? It’s important to keep your medicine cabinet tightly sealed at all times. Remember: a pet with strong jaws might be able to chew right through a flimsy plastic cap!

Call your veterinarian Olathe, KS to find out about other potential pet toxins.

Cats, Milk, and Dairy Products

Cats and milk just seem to go together. You may be surprised to learn that the two actually don’t mix! Learn more here from your vet in Ellicott City, MD.

Why Can’t Cats Drink Milk?

The majority of adult cats are lactose-intolerant, meaning that they don’t possess enough lactase in the digestive system to digest lactose, the primary enzyme of milk. Drinking too much milk will likely cause an upset stomach, diarrhea, or even vomiting.

What About Kittens?

Kittens drink their mother’s milk while nursing, yes. This is, however, the only time in a cat’s life cycle that milk is a nutritional necessity. As most cats age, they produce less lactase. By the time they’re fully grown, most cats are totally lactose-intolerant.

Is Other Dairy Okay?

Since other forms of dairy like yogurt or cheese generally contain less lactase than milk, they may be safer to feed to your feline friend. Still, it’s important not to go overboard. It’s safer to stick to cat treats or small bits of cooked meat instead—your cat will probably like these items more anyway!

Do you have questions about your cat’s diet or nutrition? Contact your animal hospital Ellicott City, MD for help.

How Do You Tell When Your Bird is Sick?

If you’re a bird owner, it’s up to you to know when your feathered friend isn’t feeling up to snuff. Here, your North Phoenix, AZ veterinary professional gives you a crash course in some of the most common signs of illness in birds.

Cere Trouble

Your bird’s cere is the area above the beak that houses the nostrils; think of it as your bird’s nose. If you see discharge coming from this area, or if you notice crusts, redness, inflammation, or anything else out of the ordinary, it’s time to notify your vet.

Ruffled Feathers

While birds do ruffle their feathers normally, they don’t typically keep them ruffled for long periods of time. If you’ve noticed that your bird has kept the feathers ruffled for a full day or longer, a trip to the vet’s office is in order.

Loss of Appetite

Like many other pets, a loss of appetite isn’t healthy in birds. If you’re noticing a lot of leftover food in your feathered companion’s bowl recently, tell your veterinarian. Everything from illness to infection to injury could be to blame.

Set up an appointment with your veterinary clinic North Phoenix, AZ if your bird needs prompt veterinary attention.

Dental Health Tips for Cats and Dogs

Our pets’ dental health is extremely important—did you know that oral issues are some of the most common health problems that veterinarians treat amongst domesticated dogs and cats? Don’t let your pet fall into the statistic; use these tips from an Aurora, CO veterinarian to keep their teeth and gums healthy.

Quality Diet

Good dental health starts with a great diet. Make sure your pet is eating a high-quality, nutritionally balanced food that is appropriate for their breed, age, weight, and body condition. Ask your veterinarian for a recommendation if you think your pet’s diet could be improved.

Good Chew Toys

Chew toys aren’t just a lot of fun, they help keep the teeth and gums strong. Plus, they scrape away some of the soft plaque on your pet’s tooth surfaces, removing it before it hardens into tartar.

Veterinary Visits

The best way to keep your pet’s dental health in check is by keeping regular appointments with your veterinarian. This way, your veterinary professional can catch any problems early on, before they’re allowed to develop into serious issues. If your pet needs a dental examination, set up an appointment with your vet Aurora, CO as soon as possible!

Dealing with Pet Odors in the Home

It’s not uncommon for our homes to start smelling a bit too much like our pets after a while. If you’d like to return your home to its former freshness, try these tips from a Greenwood, IN vet:


Your pet is the source of the odor, so it makes sense to start there. Groom your pet daily, and you’ll notice a dramatic difference! Brushing your pet daily removes loose fur, preventing it from winding up on carpets and furniture, and it also spreads essential skin oils through the coat to keep the fur properly moisturized.

Pet Beds

Pet beds can often be a source of odors, especially if your pet hoards food there. Be sure to toss your pet’s bed into the washing machine regularly, and try sprinkling a bit of baking soda on it for a few hours before cleaning it off and returning it to your pet.

Odor Neutralizer Products

Air fresheners only mask smells. Odor neutralizers, however, combat the enzymes that cause odors in the first place, eliminating them for good. Pick up an odor neutralizer made to combat pet smells at your local pet supply store.

Contact your vet clinic Greenwood, IN for more advice.

The Importance of Playing with Your Pet

Playing with your pet is about more than just good plain fun (although it’s great for that, too!). Below, your vet in Atlanta, GA tells you about just a few of playtime’s many benefits.

Physical Activity

Playing with your pet keeps them physically active, which is essential for all aspects of their health. A pet who doesn’t exercise is likely to develop obesity and other harmful health problems, and playing is one of the best ways to get your pet exercising daily.

Mental Engagement

Pets who don’t play don’t get mental stimulation. This may lead to undesirable behaviors, from house soiling to aggression to improper chewing. Keep your pet’s mind stimulated just like his body—make a point to play with your pet daily.

Bonding Time

Another benefit of regular playtime is the bonding time it offers for you and your four-legged friend. The relationship you can have with an animal is one of the great joys of life, so foster and strengthen that bond with fun and productive playtime.

Ask your veterinarian what sort of play routines will work best for your particular pet, and set up an appointment with your veterinarian Atlanta, GA for a professional veterinary examination.