Category Archives: Pets Care

How to Save Money on Animal Care

Let’s face it—everyone would like to save a little money here and there. How do you do that when it comes to your pet? Here, your Carmel, IN vet tells you about a few easy ways to save cash without causing detriment to your animal friend’s health.

Preventive Medicine

Preventive medicine isn’t just more effective than treatment, it’s far less expensive. Save yourself money by having your pet wear year-round pest preventatives to ward off infestations or infections. Keep them up-to-date on proper vaccinations to prevent disease. It’s a great way to save money in the long run!

Portion Control

Don’t overfeed your pet; feed them in proper, measured portion sizes to keep them at a healthy weight. Obesity can be costly and time-consuming to correct! Plus, you’re wasting food and will have to buy more sooner rather than later.

Home Grooming

Unless your pet has special grooming needs, you can save a little money by grooming them yourself at home. Ask your vet what sort of brush and bristle type will work best on your particular pet’s coat of fur.

Want more tips for saving money on pet care? Don’t hesitate to call your veterinary clinic Carmel, IN.

Defeating Litter Box Odors

Litter boxes, for obvious reasons, can be a bit smelly. There are many ways to combat the problem, though! Here, your Coon Rapids, MN vet tells you what to do if Fluffy’s bathroom is becoming a bit too odorous.

Closed Box

Does your cat’s litter box have a top portion? If not, purchase or construct one promptly. Closing off your cat’s box will do wonders for containing the smell! An open litter box allows odors to float around unrestricted.

Scented Litter

Try switching up your cat’s litter—pick a litter type that is made to seal in odors effectively. If you’d like a recommendation on a great litter choice, contact your vet’s office for help.

Regular Cleaning

There’s just no substitute for regular cleaning when it comes to your cat’s bathroom. Scoop it out on a daily basis, and be sure to add a bit of fresh litter to replace that which you’ve removed. Once a week or so, clean out the litter and replace it entirely with fresh litter. This will ensure that your cat’s bathroom stays clean and odor-free at all times.

Would you like more tips on caring for your cat? Call your veterinary clinic Coon Rapids, MN.

Protecting Your Pet From Mosquitoes

Mosquitoes like latching onto our animal companions just as much as they like latching onto us! Mosquitos, of course, can transmit dangerous disease like heartworm, so it’s important to prevent the problem. Learn how below from a Marietta, GA vet.

Repellents

Did you know that there are insect repellents made just for pets? Never use a repellent designed for humans on your dog or cat—it may do more harm than good. Ask your veterinarian for a recommendation on a pet-safe insect repellent for your next summer walk or vacation.

Preventatives

Keep your pet on a quality heartworm preventative. This is simply the best way to avoid the main danger that mosquitoes pose, and it also helps prevent infestation by other worms. If your pet needs a heartworm preventative, call your vet’s office right away.

Yard Tips

Since mosquitoes like to breed in stagnant water, remove any containers or objects from your yard that may hold water after it rains. This is the most effective way to keep mosquito numbers to a minimum in the areas where your pet spends a lot of time.

Would you like more information on mosquitoes and your pet? Contact your pet clinic Marietta, GA today.

Clipping Your Pooch’s Nails

When a dog’s nails grow too long, they can snag in carpets, fracture painfully, and even make walking difficult. That’s why nail trims are essential part of your dog’s grooming regimen! Below, your Indianapolis, IN veterinarian goes over the basics.

Gather Supplies

First, gather everything you’ll need in one area. This includes a set of dog-specific nail trimmers, a styptic powder to staunch any bleeding, and a few dog treats.

Snip the Tips

When your dog is calm, take one paw and begin snipping the nail tips with your clippers. Remember: you’re only trying to blunt the tip! Don’t clip too far, or you’ll snip the nail’s blood vessel and cause bleeding. This is where your styptic powder or pen comes in handy.

Repeat and Reward

Move around to each paw to clip all of your dog’s nails. Take your time—if your pooch becomes uncomfortable, give them a break before trying again later. Try giving your dog a treat after each paw is completed; this will reinforce the idea that successful nail trims warrant a reward!

For help with your dog’s nail trims, contact your animal hospital Indianapolis, IN. We’re here to help with all of your pet-care needs!

Guinea Pig Care 101

Guinea pigs make wonderful little pets for the right family. They do have specific care needs, though! Learn more about the specifics of guinea pig care from your Crown Point, IN veterinary professional:

Cage and Bedding

Purchase a large wire-mesh cage for your guinea pig, and make sure it has a solid bottom to accommodate your pig’s wood-shaving bedding material. This bedding will need to be changed out on a regular basis to keep things fresh. Ask your vet to recommend a good bedding type and brand.

Dietary Needs

Guinea pigs need a steady supply of fresh timothy hay to chew on, as well as a commercial pellet diet to make of the bulk of their food intake. In addition, your pig will need fresh fruits and vegetables on a daily basis—cucumbers, zucchini, carrots, lettuce, kiwi, blueberries, and strawberries are good choices.

Handling Your Pig

Many guinea pigs are quite skittish; bear in mind that it may take weeks or even months before your pig warms up to human contact! Be patient while socializing your new pet.

Do you have questions about guinea pig care? Does your new addition need an exam? Call your animal hospital Crown Point, IN.

Three Easy Ways to Save on Your Pet’s Healthcare

Pets aren’t always cheap! Let’s face it—it would be nice to save a little money now and then when it comes to your pet’s healthcare. Here, your Jacksonville Beach, FL veterinarian tells you how to do that while maintaining your animal friend’s excellent health.

Practice Preventive Medicine

Have your pet vaccinated early on in life to ward off diseases like parvovirus, parainfluenza, hepatitis, distemper, and rabies. Keep your pet up-to-date on preventive medicines to keep fleas, ticks, and worms at bay. The costs of preventive medications are far less than treating a problem after the fact!

Spay and Neuter

Spaying and neutering, of course, saves you the cost of an unexpected litter. It also eliminates the risk of genital cancers, reduces the risk of many other cancer types, and even makes common problems like UTIs less likely to occur. All in all, it’s one of the most cost-effective procedures you’ll ever have your pet undergo!

Feed a Proper Diet

Ask your vet to recommend a great diet for your pet, and ask about proper portion size. It’s one of the best—and least expensive—ways to keep your pet healthy!

For more tips, call your pet clinic Jacksonville Beach, FL.

Vaccines for Puppies

Are you about to bring home a puppy? Vaccination is essential for keeping your new addition healthy for a lifetime. A Frisco, TX veterinary professional goes over the basics of puppy vaccines below:

Core Vaccines

All puppies need the core vaccines because of the dangerous and contagious nature of the diseases they protect against. Core vaccines include those that protect against distemper, parvovirus, parainfluenza, hepatitis, calicivirus, and rabies, among others.

Non-Core Vaccines

As the name implies, non-core vaccines aren’t considered necessary for all dogs. They are recommended in certain cases, though, depending on exposure risk, environment, and other factors. One example is the Lyme disease vaccination, which is helpful for any puppy who lives in an area where ticks are common.

Vaccine Scheduling

Puppies can start receiving essential vaccines as early as eight weeks of age. The initial vaccine regimen will conclude at about 16 weeks of age, and then puppies will need booster shots over time to keep vaccines effective. Booster shots are given on a yearly basis or in multi-year increments; ask your veterinarian for more specifics.

Does your puppy need his initial vaccinations? We’re here for you! Make an appointment today with your Frisco, TX veterinary clinic. Learn more here.

Don’t Believe These Rescue Pet Myths

Unfortunately, rescue and shelter pets are often misunderstood. Allow us to set the record straight! Your Pickerington, OH veterinarian dispels some common misconceptions below.

Rescue Pets Aren’t Well-Behaved

Some believe that a pet wouldn’t wind up in a shelter in the first place if they were well-behaved. This isn’t true; pets come to shelters for a myriad of reasons, and one of the least common is poor behavior. The vast majority of shelter pets are gentle, loving, and perfectly well-mannered.

Rescue Pets Are Old

Not true! Pets of any age can be found in a shelter, from young puppies and kittens to senior pets and everything in between.

Rescue Pets Are Expensive

Think shelter pets are expensive to adopt? Think again! The truth is that you’ll likely pay far less in adoption fees than you would purchase a pet directly from a breeder or a pet store. Plus, many shelter pets have already had essential vaccinations administered and they may be spayed or neutered, saving you the cost of these procedures in the long run.

Does your newly adopted pet need veterinary attention? Have more questions about rescue pets? We’re here to help! Contact your pet clinic Pickerington, OH today.

Pet Danger Spots at Home

Even in the safest of homes are a few spots that can prove hazardous to pets. Fortunately, it just takes some simple precautionary measures to keep your animal companion safe! Learn more below from a vet in Marietta, GA.

The Kitchen

All sorts of human foods—grapes, raisins, chocolate, candy, gum, onions, garlic, chives, leeks, scallions, shallots, certain nuts, caffeine, alcohol, and much more—aren’t safe for pets. Kitchens also contain plenty of sharp objects and edges, including knives, graters, and forks. The hot surfaces of stovetops, coffeepots, and toasters are also hazardous. Keep your pet out of the kitchen when preparing food.

The Supply Closet

Almost every typical cleaning product contains a few ingredients that aren’t safe for pets. Everything from toilet bowl cleaner and air fresheners to carpet shampoo and furniture polish can pose a threat! Keep pets elsewhere when cleaning, and keep the supply closet shut tightly at all times.

The Medicine Cabinet

Various human medications—prescription drugs, aspirin, cough syrup, antidepressants, and much more—can poison a pet who manages to swallow them. Never allow your companion access to the medicine cabinet!

For more pet safety tips, give your veterinary Marietta, GA professional a call today.

Pet Identification 101

One of the best things you’ll ever do for your cat or dog is keep them properly identified. It’s right up there with vaccination, pest control, and regular check-ups! Here, your Scottsdale, AZ veterinarian goes over the basics of pet identification.

The Importance of Identification

If you’re new to pet ownership, you might wonder why it’s so important to identify your animal companion. The reason is this: if your pet gets lost or runs away, identification is the number-one way that they’ll be returned to you safe and sound! If they’re left unidentified, the chances of finding them again are reduced drastically.

ID Tags vs. Microchips

Microchips are more permanent than ID tags, as they can’t be removed by a pet, and they’re easy to have updated if your contact information changes. ID tags, though, are more visible to those who find your lost pet. Most pet owners use ID tags and a microchip in tandem for maximum effectiveness.

Dog License

Many local municipalities require dog owners to get a license for their new addition. These are easy to obtain and aren’t expensive—talk to your vet for more information.

Does your pet need identified? Contact your vet Scottsdale, AZ.