Category Archives: Pets Care

Don’t Believe These Rescue Pet Myths

Unfortunately, rescue and shelter pets are often misunderstood. Allow us to set the record straight! Your Pickerington, OH veterinarian dispels some common misconceptions below.

Rescue Pets Aren’t Well-Behaved

Some believe that a pet wouldn’t wind up in a shelter in the first place if they were well-behaved. This isn’t true; pets come to shelters for a myriad of reasons, and one of the least common is poor behavior. The vast majority of shelter pets are gentle, loving, and perfectly well-mannered.

Rescue Pets Are Old

Not true! Pets of any age can be found in a shelter, from young puppies and kittens to senior pets and everything in between.

Rescue Pets Are Expensive

Think shelter pets are expensive to adopt? Think again! The truth is that you’ll likely pay far less in adoption fees than you would purchase a pet directly from a breeder or a pet store. Plus, many shelter pets have already had essential vaccinations administered and they may be spayed or neutered, saving you the cost of these procedures in the long run.

Does your newly adopted pet need veterinary attention? Have more questions about rescue pets? We’re here to help! Contact your pet clinic Pickerington, OH today.

Pet Danger Spots at Home

Even in the safest of homes are a few spots that can prove hazardous to pets. Fortunately, it just takes some simple precautionary measures to keep your animal companion safe! Learn more below from a vet in Marietta, GA.

The Kitchen

All sorts of human foods—grapes, raisins, chocolate, candy, gum, onions, garlic, chives, leeks, scallions, shallots, certain nuts, caffeine, alcohol, and much more—aren’t safe for pets. Kitchens also contain plenty of sharp objects and edges, including knives, graters, and forks. The hot surfaces of stovetops, coffeepots, and toasters are also hazardous. Keep your pet out of the kitchen when preparing food.

The Supply Closet

Almost every typical cleaning product contains a few ingredients that aren’t safe for pets. Everything from toilet bowl cleaner and air fresheners to carpet shampoo and furniture polish can pose a threat! Keep pets elsewhere when cleaning, and keep the supply closet shut tightly at all times.

The Medicine Cabinet

Various human medications—prescription drugs, aspirin, cough syrup, antidepressants, and much more—can poison a pet who manages to swallow them. Never allow your companion access to the medicine cabinet!

For more pet safety tips, give your veterinary Marietta, GA professional a call today.

Pet Identification 101

One of the best things you’ll ever do for your cat or dog is keep them properly identified. It’s right up there with vaccination, pest control, and regular check-ups! Here, your Scottsdale, AZ veterinarian goes over the basics of pet identification.

The Importance of Identification

If you’re new to pet ownership, you might wonder why it’s so important to identify your animal companion. The reason is this: if your pet gets lost or runs away, identification is the number-one way that they’ll be returned to you safe and sound! If they’re left unidentified, the chances of finding them again are reduced drastically.

ID Tags vs. Microchips

Microchips are more permanent than ID tags, as they can’t be removed by a pet, and they’re easy to have updated if your contact information changes. ID tags, though, are more visible to those who find your lost pet. Most pet owners use ID tags and a microchip in tandem for maximum effectiveness.

Dog License

Many local municipalities require dog owners to get a license for their new addition. These are easy to obtain and aren’t expensive—talk to your vet for more information.

Does your pet need identified? Contact your vet Scottsdale, AZ.

Saving Money When You Own a Pet

Let’s face it—pets aren’t always cheap! The question is, how do you save money while keeping your pet’s health in top form? Below, your Indianapolis, IN veterinarian gives you a few easy tips.

Preventive Care

By having your pet wear seasonal or year-round pest preventives to ward off fleas, ticks, worms, and mosquitoes, you’re avoiding the cost of treatment later. The same goes for vaccination—avoid dangerous diseases initially, and you’re saving yourself the cost of correcting these issues down the road.

Portion Control

Don’t overfeed your dog or cat, because you’re only wasting food. You’re also contributing to potential obesity, which can be costly to reverse later in your pet’s life. For advice on your pet’s proper portion size, contact your vet’s office for help.

Groom at Home

Brush and bathe your pet at home; this will keep your animal companion looking their best and lengthen the time needed between appointments at the groomers. Ultimately, it saves you money!

Does your pet need vaccinations or pest-control products? Would you like help to slim your four-legged friend down? We’re here to help with all of your most important pet care needs! Set up an appointment to see your vet Indianapolis, IN.

Stop Fluffy from Nibbling on Plants

It’s not uncommon for our feline friends to nibble on plants now and again. Not only can this harm your foliage, it might hurt your cat! Put a stop to Fluffy’s behavior with these tips from your Livonia, MI veterinary professional.

Training

Every time you see your cat nibble on plants, clap your hands and say “no!” in a firm voice. Over time, your cat should get the hint—going near the plant isn’t a good choice.

Alternative Options

Make sure your cat is fed a premium diet; some cats might nibble on plants in an attempt to get nutrition that they’re missing out on. You can also try providing your feline friend with cat grass, toys, and a scratching post—it’s possible that Fluffy is nibbling on plants because she isn’t properly stimulated with other items.

Deterrents

Another option is taste deterrents. These products are sprayed or otherwise applied to plants in order to ward off cats who get too close. Ask your veterinarian for a recommendation.

Does your cat need veterinary attention? Wondering what plants are dangerous for our four-legged friends? Give your vet Livonia, MI a call today. We’re here for all of your pet-care needs!

The Most Common Pet Poisons at Home

No matter how vigilant you are about pet safety, you undoubtedly have a few pet toxins at home. The trick is knowing what they are and how to have your pet avoid the danger! Learn about some of the most common in-home pet toxins here from a Lakeville, MN vet.

Human Foods

Plenty of human foods—grapes and raisins, onions, garlic, chives, leeks, shallots, macadamia nuts, chocolate, candy, gum, alcoholic beverages, caffeine, salty foods, fatty items, and much more—can poison pets if they get their paws on them. Store harmful foods safely where pets can’t reach.

Pesticide Products

If you set up pesticide products in or around your to home to get rid of insects or rodents, make sure they’re placed carefully where pets can’t gain access. It’s all too easy for these products to poison our four-legged friends!

Toxic Plants

Dieffenbachia, elephant ear, lilies, tulips, daffodils, various types of aloe plants, ivy, poinsettias, certain rubber plants, rhododendron/azalea… the list of poisonous houseplants and flowers goes on and on! Check your home for toxic offenders, and remove them at once.

For more insight into pet poisons in your home, call your vet clinic Lakeville, MN. We’re here to help!

Is Your Bird Feeling Ill?

It’s not always easy to tell when your feathered friend isn’t feeling up to par. As a bird owner, you must be aware of the initial signs of illness! Here, your Sugar Land, TX vet gives you a crash course:

Cere Issues

Your bird’s cere is the area that houses the nostrils, located just above the beak. If you notice runny discharge coming from the nostrils, or if you see dried crusts around this area, it’s time to let your veterinarian know. This could be a sign of infection or disease.

Ruffled Feathers

Yes, bird ruffles their feathers occasionally. If they keep them ruffled for an extended period of time, though, something might be wrong. As a general rule, let your veterinarian know if your bird keeps the feathers ruffled for more than a fully day.

Loss of Appetite

A loss of appetite can mean many things, but it’s always safest to have your bird examined if you’ve noticed him leaving more kibble in his bowl. Better to be safe than sorry!

For more information on your bird’s health and behavior, call your veterinary clinic Sugar Land, TX today. We are here to help with all of your pet care needs!

Pet Poisons in Your Home or Apartment

Did you know that you likely already have a few pet poisons in your home, no matter how conscientious you are about pet safety? Here, your Columbia, MD veterinarian tells you what to look out for and how to prevent the danger.

Toxic Foods

Grapes, raisins, onions, garlic, chives, leeks, scallions, shallots, chocolate, candy, alcohol, macadamia nuts, avocado, caffeine, salt, fatty foods, and much more all present a risk to our four-legged friends. Store all dangerous foods where they belong—inside closed cabinets or the refrigerator, where your pet can’t reach.

Pesticides

Do you use pestsicides in or around your home to ward off insects or intruding rodents? Remember: these products are poisonous! Don’t let your pet anywhere near them, and consider non-toxic alternatives like mechanical traps for your pet’s safety.

Poisonous Plant Life

There are all sorts of poisonous plants and flowers out there, including lilies, dieffenbachia, elephant ear, aloe plants, rubber plants, ivy, oleander, azalea/rhododendron, daffodils, tulips, and much more. Remove any offenders from your home, garden, or landscaping right away so that your pet stays safe!

Would you like further advice on keeping your pet safe at home? Give your veterinary clinic Columbia, MD a call today.

The Benefits of Getting Your Pet Microchipped

Is your pet wearing a microchip? It’s one of the simplest and most effective ways to keep them properly identified for a lifetime. Learn about the major benefits of microchips as your Colorado Springs, CO tells you more:

Secure Identification

Since microchips are implanted under a pet’s skin, it’s impossible for your pet to remove them, whether by accident or on purpose. ID tags on a collar, however, could get snagged and pulled off or chewed away. Microchips afford you the advantage of never having to worry about your pet’s identification!

Easy to Update

If you change addresses or get a new telephone number, you don’t have to purchase an entirely new microchip. Simply contact the chip manufacturer, and they’ll update your pet’s information in their database. You don’t even have to leave home!

Quick, Painless, and Inexpensive

Microchips aren’t expensive, usually coming in under $100 for the chip itself and the implant procedure. The procedure itself is quick and painless; all your pet feels is a momentary pinch before it’s all over.

Are you ready to have your animal friend microchipped? Do you have further questions about the procedure? Give your Pet Clinic Colorado Springs, CO a call today.

Maintaining Fido’s Dental Health at Home

Did you know that you can easily maintain your pooch’s dental health in the comfort of your own home? It’s not a substitute for good veterinary care, but it can certainly help keep Fido’s mouth healthy in between appointments! Learn more below from a vet in Marietta, GA:

Diet and Water

Your pet’s good dental health starts with a balanced diet and a steady supply of fresh water. Make sure your dog is eating a premium food with the proper amounts of minerals, vitamins, and other nutrients for good tooth health. Consult your veterinarian for a recommendation on a quality diet.

Mouth Checks

Examine your dog’s mouth on a weekly basis to check for redness, swelling and/or inflammation, bleeding, plaque buildup, cracked teeth, misalignment, or anything else that looks abnormal. Let your vet know if you find anything amiss.

Brushing Sessions

Brush your dog’s teeth at home with a canine-formulated toothpaste and a specialized toothbrush. Begin by simply massaging your dog’s teeth and gums with a finger; this will get him used to the brushing sensation before you move on to the real thing.

Want help maintaining your dog’s dental health? Make an appointment at your vet’s Marietta, GA office.