Category Archives: Dogs Care

How Dog Ownership Can Improve Your Health

Owning a dog sure is a lot of fun. Were you aware that it may also improve your own health? Your veterinarian Ellicott City, MD tells you more below:

Good Exercise

One of the simplest ways that dogs can improve your health is through physical exercise. Dogs require regular walks—that means you’ll be walking too. Even playtime with your dog provides valuable exercise and calorie-burning time.

Lower Stress Levels

It’s believed that dog owners typically have lower stress levels than those who don’t own pets at all. There’s most certainly something to be said for having a loving, trusted companion that you can confide in whenever you need to!

Improved Heart Health

Studies show that dog owners, on the whole, have better heart health, lower blood pressure, and lower cholesterol levels than non-dog owners. This is likely due to a combination of the above factors; getting regular exercise and reducing your stress levels results in improved heart health over time!

Does your canine companion need veterinary attention? Do you have questions about Fido’s healthcare regimen or behavior? We’re here to help with all of your pet-care needs! Set up an appointment today at your pet clinic Ellicott City, MD.

Care Tips for Your Senior Dog

Do you live with an elderly canine companion? Now more than ever, your pet needs your love and attention! Use these tips from a vet Colorado Springs, CO to keep your aging dog healthy.

Special Diet

Ask your veterinarian if your older dog should be fed a specially formulated senior diet. For many of our aging canine companions, this type of diet is essential for receiving the proper nutrients as your pet gets older.

Light Exercise

Combined with a great diet, exercising your dog lightly every day is the best way to keep their body in shape and make sure that excess weight stays off. Ask your vet about the best techniques for exercising your senior dog on a daily basis.

Veterinary Visits

It’s recommended that your dog see their veterinarian twice per year, if not more frequently as they age. This is the best way to make sure that your dog stays healthy in the long-term—any problems can be caught and treated early on, before they’re allowed to get any worse.

Does your dog need a veterinary examination? Do you have questions about your senior companion’s healthcare or behavior? Contact your veterinarian Colorado Springs, CO for help.

Water Safety for Dogs

Have you ever tried swimming with your dog? Some dogs love it, and some don’t! Below, your vet Aurora, CO offers a few general tips for keeping your dog safe and happy in the water.

Can Your Dog Swim?

Contrary to popular belief, not all dogs are great swimmers. Some can’t swim at all! Before dunking your canine companion into the water, make sure they’re comfortable swimming. It’s best to test it out in a kiddie pool or similar structure before venturing into a lake or the ocean.

Provide Support

No matter the body of water you’re in—a backyard pool, a lake, or the ocean—it’s always safest to head into the water with your dog to provide a helping hand. It’s especially important in the ocean, where your dog might not be used to waves and currents!

Don’t Drink the Water

Don’t let your dog drink chlorinated pool water or salty ocean water. Both can irritate the throat and stomach, and dogs might experience vomiting if they ingest too much. Bring along a thermos of cool, fresh water just for your pooch to drink.

For more water safety tips for your dog, contact your animal hospital Aurora, CO.

Taking Your Canine Companion to the Beach

It sure is a lot of fun to take your dog to the beach. If you’re planning a shore excursion soon, make sure to keep your dog’s safety in mind. Use these tips from a veterinarian Frisco, TX to do just that:

Heat and Sun

Bring along a beach umbrella to provide shade for your dog, and pack a thermos full of cool water for Fido to drink from. Don’t let him drink ocean water, as this will only dry out the mouth and make your dog thirstier. If your dog appears to be getting overheated, it’s best to go back indoors where it’s air-conditioned.

Water Safety

Only allow your dog to venture into the shallows—if he swims too far out in the ocean, he might become exhausted or have to deal with a deadly rip tide. Always follow your pooch into the water to lend a supportive hand.

Check the Rules

Before visiting the beach with your dog, check the beach rules. Not every beach allows pets at all, and those that do may have specific requirements or restrictions.

Would you like more tips for taking your dog to the beach? Contact your vet clinic Frisco, TX today.

Onion Toxicity and Your Dog

Did you know that onions are one of the most dangerous foods out there for our canine companions? Of course, they’re also very common in most households. Learn more below from your North Phoenix, AZ veterinarian.

Why Are Onions Dangerous?

Onions contain a chemical called thiosulphate, and it’s this chemical that causes problems. In particular, it can lead to hemolytic anemia, a condition in which your dog’s red blood cells become damaged to the point of bursting.

It’s important to note that foods related to onions—garlic, shallots, scallions, leeks, chives, etc.—also contain thiosulphate and are equally dangerous.

What are the Symptoms?

The symptoms of onion toxicity include weakness, loss of appetite, vomiting, diarrhea, and breathing difficulty. These symptoms may be delayed, meaning that they can appear several days after ingestion—yet another reason why onions are so dangerous!

What If My Dog Eats an Onion?

If you see or suspect that your dog has eaten an onion or a related food, call ahead to your vet’s office and rush your dog there as quickly as possible. Quick veterinary action is the best way to make sure your dog recovers!

For more information, call your animal hospital North Phoenix, AZ.

What Kind of Leash is Right for Your Dog?

If you’ve recently adopted a dog, you’ll need to get them a proper leash if you haven’t done so already. There are all sorts of leashes available—how do you know what to choose? Your Lafayette, LA veterinarian gives you a crash course below:

The Standard Leash

For the vast majority of dogs, the standard leash will work well. They’re typically about six feet long, although they come in shorter and longer sizes, and are most often made of a strong nylon material. The standard leash has a clasp on one end to attach to your dog’s collar, and a loop on the other for you to hold.

Retractable Leashes

Retractable leashes feature a spring-loaded handle mechanism. This allows your dog to range away from you a bit before you press a button to stop the leash from unwinding. Retractable leashes work best with smaller dogs, as large dogs may be able to jerk the leash out of your hands too easily.

Training Leashes

Training leashes may be extra long or short, or made of special materials. You don’t need to use one unless directed to do so by a veterinary professional.

For further advice, call your vets Lafayette, LA.

Traveling By Car With Your Dog

It’s a good bet that you’ll have to travel with your dog in the car at one point or another, whether you’re going on a family vacation or a trip to the vet’s office. Below, your Glendale, AZ veterinarian offers a few tips for safe car travel.

Car Anxiety

Many dogs aren’t comfortable in the car, probably because it only ever takes them to the vet’s office. Try acclimating your dog to the car slowly by allowing him to explore it while the vehicle is still parked in the driveway. Go on frequent, short trips around the block or to a local park.

Use the Carrier

It’s always safest to keep your dog in their carrier while in the car, rather than letting them roam free. This will keep your dog as safe as possible if you have to brake quickly, and it prevents your dog from blocking your feet or obstructing your vision while driving.

Pit Stops

If you’re going on a longer journey by car, take frequent pit stops and allow your dog to get out of the car briefly. This will help combat carsickness and provide a bathroom-break opportunity. Call your animal hospital Glendale, AZ for more tips.

Understanding Your Puppy’s Vaccination Requirements

If you’re new to puppy ownership, one of the first things you’ll need to have taken care of is vaccinations. They’re essential for a happy, disease-free life! Learn more below as your Cy-Fair veterinarian goes over the basics.

Core Vaccines

The core vaccines are considered necessary for all puppies based on the contagious and/or dangerous characteristics of the diseases they protect against. The core vaccines include those that ward off distemper, parvovirus, influenza, hepatitis, and rabies, among others.

Non-Core Vaccines

Non-core vaccines, as you’ve probably guessed, aren’t necessary for all puppies. They’re recommended for some, though, because of factors like environment, exposure risk, and others. The Bordetella vaccine, which prevents a kennel cough, is one example; it will likely be very helpful for a dog who will commonly be boarded later in life.

Scheduling

Most puppies can start receiving vaccines as young as eight weeks of age. From there, the initial round of vaccines will conclude at about 16 weeks of age, and then your pup will need occasional booster shots to keep vaccines effective for life.

For more information on the scheduling of your puppy’s vaccinations, contact your veterinary clinic Cy-Fair. We’re here to help as your puppy grows up!

How to Keep Fido Calm at the Vet’s Office

If your dog is like many, he’s not too keen on the vet’s office. There are a few things you can try to lessen Fido’s anxiety, though! Learn more here from a vet in Greensboro, NC.

Car Anxiety

Many dogs have car anxiety, and for good reason—the car only ever takes them to the vet’s office! If your dog is frightened of the car, warm him up to it a bit by taking him on frequent but short drives. This way, he’ll be less anxious when it’s time to visit the vet.

Mock Exams

Try staging “mock exams” at home in the weeks leading up to your dog’s next appointment. Prop your dog up on a table, steadying them with one hand, and poke and prod them a bit. This will get Fido used to the sensations he’ll feel during a real exam at the vet’s office!

In the Waiting Room

Bring along a few of your dog’s favorite toys, as well as a few treats, to give him a sense of familiarity in the waiting room.

Want more tips for calming your dog’s anxiety? Set up an appointment to see your veterinarian Greensboro, NC. We’re here for you!

Swimming Safety 101 for Dog Owners

It’s a lot of fun to take your dog swimming with you, whether you’re heading to the beach or simply taking a dip in your backyard pool. Keep a few safety tips in mind, though—learn more here from a Savannah, GA veterinarian.

Can Your Dog Swim?

Before attempting to get into the water with your dog, ask yourself a simple question: can your canine companion swim? Contrary to popular belief, not all dogs are strong swimmers! Most retriever-type breeds will do fine, but stubby dogs like pugs or terriers might not be comfortable in the water at all. Don’t force your dog to swim if he doesn’t want to.

Provide Support

When your dog does take a dip, always go in with him to provide support. This is especially important if you’re swimming in the ocean or a public body of water. Never let your pet venture too far off shore, and keep a close eye on them to make sure they don’t exhaust themselves.

The Final Rinse

Rinse out any chlorine or salt from your dog’s coat after the swim; these substances can irritate the skin if left there.

For more safety tips, contact your animal hospital Savannah, GA.