Category Archives: Dogs Care

Is It Okay for My Dog to Eat Grass?

Sometimes, our dogs eat grass. It’s just something that they do! But eating grass isn’t always a good idea for your canine friend. Learn more below as your Westminster, MD veterinarian elaborates:

Why Do Dogs Eat Grass?

No one knows for sure why dogs eat grass, and there may be multiple causes. A leading theory is that dogs eat grass to make themselves vomit, maybe to alleviate an upset or gassy stomach. Dogs might also eat grass simply because they’re sick of their normal food, or because they like the texture of grass.

Could a Medical Issue Be the Cause?

Yes, a medical issue could cause your dog to eat grass. Your dog might be attempting to glean nutrients like fiber out of grass—nutrients that they aren’t getting from their normal diet. Talk to your veterinary professional if you think your dog is eating grass too frequently.

Is Eating Grass Safe?

The occasional grass-eating episode probably won’t cause your pet any harm. But don’t let Fido make it a habit, or call your vet if you think a medical issue could be the underlying cause.

Contact your vet clinic Westminster, MD to set up your dog’s next office appointment.

Easy Care Tips for Your Dog’s Coat

When was the last time you paid attention to your dog’s coat quality? It’s up to you to make sure Fido’s coat of fur stays in good shape. Use these tips from your Newmarket, ON veterinarian to do just that:

Feed a Great Diet

The first way to maintain your dog’s coat quality might not be what you expect: feeding him a high-quality diet. When your pup receives the proper nutrition through food, the skin and hair follicles stay healthy, producing a healthy coat of fur. Ask your vet to recommend a diet choice for your dog that suits his age, weight, and breed.

Brush Regularly

Brushing your dog regularly removes grime from underneath the skin, smooths out the fur, and spreads essential skin oils through the entire coat to moisturize it naturally. What do you have to lose? Ask your vet for a precise timeline on how often you should brush your dog.

Bathe Occasionally

The occasional bath—always using a canine-specific shampoo—is another good coat-care step. Just don’t overdo it, because bathing too frequently can dry out the coat and lead to an increase in shedding!

For greater coat-care tips, call your veterinary clinic Newmarket, ON.

Can Dogs Get Poison Ivy?

We all know that poison ivy is irritating to humans. But can poison ivy affect our canine friends? It turns out that yes, dogs can suffer from toxic ivy, although it isn’t particularly common. Learn more here from an Aurora, CO veterinarian.

Symptoms of Poison Ivy

The major symptom of toxic ivy in dogs is similar to the main symptom in humans: an itchy red rash. The rash is often accompanied by blistering and swelling. Dogs can also be affected by poison oak and poison sumac, both causing similar symptoms. The rash is most likely to appear on areas that aren’t completely covered by fur.

Treating Poison Ivy

If your dog is suffering from toxic ivy, you’ll need to bathe them with warm water and dish soap, oatmeal shampoo, or a dog shampoo designed to reduce inflammation. Wear latex gloves so that the irritating agent doesn’t come into contact with your own skin. Tell your vet if the problem continues.

Preventing Poison Ivy

Keep an eye out for the “leaves of three” that toxic plants are known for. That gives you and your dog the best chance for avoiding poison ivy!

Talk to your veterinary clinic Aurora, CO for more information.

3 Tips for Boarding Your Dog

It’s a safe bet that you’ll have to board your dog at one point or another. How do you go about finding the right facility to make sure your fido is comfortable? Here are three quick tips from a vet in Glendale, AZ to board your dog successfully:

Choose the Right Facility

Always choose a boarding kennel that you’re comfortable with. Make sure it’s clean and well-staffed; take a look around before your pup’s stay to observe general cleanliness, procedures, and safety. Ask if your fido can take a tour before their stay begins.

Keep it Familiar

Make sure to bring along your dog’s bed, toys, and dishes from home. Having some items from his normal space will go a long way toward helping your fido to have a familiar sense around him while you’re gone.

Keep Goodbyes Short

Don’t go overboard with goodbyes when dropping your dog off at the kennel, tempting as it may be. By making a big deal out of leaving your dog there, your dog is only getting more excited and maybe more poorly behaved while you’re gone.

Is your dog healthy enough for boarding? Call your vet Glendale, AZ to make absolutely sure.

Why is My Dog Eating Grass?

Have you ever seen your dog eating grass? It’s a relatively common thing for our canine friends to do. But is it safe? Your Fort Collins, CO veterinarian fills you in below.

Why Do Dogs Eat Grass?

No one knows exactly why dogs eating grass, but there are several theories. One is that dogs may eat grass to induce vomiting, maybe to alleviate a gassy or upset stomach. A dog might also eat grass to add a little texture or roughage to their diet, or because they’re simply tired of their normal kibble.

Could There Be a Medical Problem?

Yes, it’s possible that a dog eating grass is doing so because of a medical issue. Your pup may be experiencing a nutritional deficiency and be eating grass in an attempt to seek out missing nutrients. Let your vet know if Fido is eating grass frequently.

Is Eating Grass Safe?

At the end of the day, it’s probably best to not let your dog eat grass. Even if there’s no medical issue at play, grass could have been treated with fertilizers or other chemicals, and you don’t want Fido ingesting them!

Call your vet clinic Fort Collins, CO to learn more.

What to Do If Fido is Shedding Too Much

Is your dog’s shedding getting to be a bit much? Most of our canine companions shed, but sometimes it can get out of hand! Read on as your Ashburn, VA veterinarian tells you what to do if your dog is shedding too much.

Brush

Brushing your dog’s coat can do wonders when it comes to cutting down on shedding. That’s because the act of brushing traps loose fur in the brush itself, preventing it from winding up all over your home. Run a brush through Fido’s coat every day or every other day.

Improve the Diet

Did you know that your dog’s diet has a lot to do with his coat health? If your dog isn’t getting the right nutrients in the right amounts, the coat will suffer. It may be time to upgrade your pooch’s diet so that his skin and fur stays in peak shape. Ask your vet to recommend a good diet choice.

Check With Your Vet

If you can’t get your dog to stop shedding excessively, it’s time to see the vet. Medical problems—skin infection, parasitic infestation, and much more—could be to blame!

Call your animal hospital Ashburn, VA to set up an appointment.

3 Care Tips for Brachycephalic Dogs

Brachycephalic dogs are those with squashed faces and bulging eyes like the pug, English and French bulldog, Boston terrier, and Pekingese. These breeds have special care requirements thanks to their unique anatomy! Learn more here from a Savannah, GA vet.

Keep Your Dog Cool

Brachycephalics tend to have small nostrils, elongated soft palates, and narrow windpipes. This means that breathing is more difficult than it is for other dogs. It’s easy for your Brachy to overheat when exercising, so don’t over-exercise them and keep them out of hot weather for extended periods.

Avoid Stress Whenever Possible

Stress is another factor that can lead to respiratory problems for Brachycephalic dogs, and it won’t be as easy for your dog to recover as it may be for other dogs. Avoid stress factors at home whenever you can; don’t make a fuss about coming and going, and don’t let your pet get overly excited during mealtimes or when guests come over.

Maintain Dental Care

Brachycephalic dogs tend to have crowded teeth thanks to their facial structure; dental issues are, therefore, rather common. Brush your dog’s teeth regularly!

Do you need help caring for your Brachycephalic dog? Contact your veterinary clinic Savannah, GA today.

Care Tips for Your Dog’s Fur

How is your dog’s coat of fur looking lately? Our canine companions aren’t quite as good at grooming themselves as our cats are, so that’s where you come in. Here are three quick tips from a vet London, ON to help you care for your dog’s fur.

Feed a Quality Diet

The first, and easiest, way to care for your dog’s coat is to feed him a high-quality diet. This ensures that your dog’s skin is getting all of the essential nutrients it needs, keeping follicles and hair healthy. Consult your vet for a recommendation on a diet choice that suits your dog’s age, weight, and breed.

Brush Regularly

Brush your dog on a regular basis. This removes grime from underneath the fur, smooths any tangles to prevent matting, and spreads essential skin oils throughout the entire coat. This moisturizes your dog’s fur naturally, giving it a healthy shine.

Bathe Occasionally

Bathing your dog occasionally keeps the skin and fur clean, and it helps your dog to smell his best. Don’t bathe too frequently, though—this can dry out the skin and fur, leading to a dull coat and more shedding.

Call your pet clinic London, ON to learn more.

Trick Your Dog Into Swallowing That Pill

Most dog owners will have to give their companions medication in pill form at some point or another. Of course, dogs can be picky—not all of our canine friends enjoy taking medicine! Your vet Brandon, FL offers a few tips on tricking your dog into taking his pill below:

Hide in Food

Often, the easiest method is to hide your dog’s pill in food. Try rolling it up in a slice of deli meat, or pushing it into the center of a glob of wet dog food. Check with your vet to make sure your dog’s pill can be taken with food.

Tossing Trick

Toss your dog a treat or two, then his pill, then another treat. With any luck, your pooch will be so excited for the stream of treats that he won’t even realize one was his pill! This method is particularly helpful for dogs who enjoy catching treats in mid-air.

Crushing Pills

Ask your vet about crushing or grinding your dog’s pill. If you’re able to, you can then sprinkle it over food or stir the medication into meals.

Want help with your dog’s medication? Contact your veterinary clinic Brandon, FL today. We’re here to help!

3 Tips for Economical Dog Care

Most of us would love to save a little money here and there when it comes to our dog’s care. Of course, we would never sacrifice our pets’ well-being or happiness! Here are three tips on economical dog care from your veterinarian Murrieta, CA that also keep your pooch healthy:

Practice Preventative Care

Preventative healthcare is more effective than treating illness or infection, and it’s cheaper. Keep your dog on year-round pest control products to ward off fleas, ticks, and worms. Have your pet stay updated with essential vaccinations that protect against diseases like parvovirus, distemper, and rabies.

Use Portion Control

Don’t overfeed your dog—this wastes food, thereby wasting your money, and it can make your pet overweight. Obesity can be costly and time-consuming to reverse later in life, and it can lead to plenty of other health problems!

Spay or Neuter

Spaying or neutering your dog eliminates the risk of genital cancers, makes prostate and breast cancer far less likely, and even helps to reduce the risk of UTIs and other common ailments. What a great way to save on dog care!

Does your pet need pest-control products or a portion size recommendation? Call your vet Murrieta, CA.