Category Archives: Cats care

Can I Give My Cat Milk?

Have you ever given your feline friend milk? You might be surprised to find out that milk isn’t good for most cats! Here, your Orangevale, CA veterinarian tells you more.

Why Can’t Cats Drink Milk?

The majority of cats are actually lactose-intolerant, just like some humans are. This means that they don’t possess enough lactase in the gut to digest lactose, milk’s major enzyme. Drinking too much milk will surely result in an upset stomach, if not diarrhea and vomiting. It’s not worth the risk!

Don’t Kittens Need Milk?

Yes, kittens require their mother’s milk (or a formula substitute if the mother isn’t around) when they’re young. This is the only time in a cat’s life, though, that they’ll need milk of any kind. As kittens grow, they produce less and less lactase, becoming lactose-intolerant by the time they’re adults.

Is Other Dairy Safe for Cats?

Because other forms of dairy like yogurt and cheese contain smaller amounts of lactose than milk, they’re a bit safer for cats. They’re not nutritionally necessary in the least, though—it’s safest to avoid giving your cat dairy of any kind.

Talk to your Vets Orangevale, CA for more information on your cat’s diet.

Milk, Dairy, and Our Housecats

For whatever reason, cats and milk just seem to pair together. Believe it or not, the two don’t mix! Learn more below from a vet in Myakka, FL.

Why Shouldn’t Cats Have Milk?

Most adult cats are lactose-intolerant, meaning that they can’t properly digest lactose, the primary enzyme of milk and other dairy foods. This is the same condition that many humans suffer from! When a cat drinks too much milk, an upset stomach, vomiting, or diarrhea is likely to result.

Don’t Kittens Need Milk?

Yes, kittens require milk from their mother or a milk-formula substitute when they are young. This is the only time in a cat’s life, however, that milk is necessary. Cats generally grow more and more lactose-intolerant as they age, and won’t take kindly to milk once they’re fully grown.

What About Other Dairy?

Since other dairy products—yogurt, cheese, etc.—contain less lactose than pure milk, they may not cause problems as quickly as milk does. However, dairy is not a nutritional necessity for any adult cat. Keep the portion size extremely small if you must give your cat a dairy treat!

Contact your Vet Myakka, FL for more information on your cat’s dietary needs.

Your Cat’s Tail Communications

Did you know that one of the primary ways that cats communicate (aside from vocalizations, which they use almost exclusively for us!) is by the tail? Learn about your cat’s tail communications below from an Ellicott City, MD vet.

 

Flagpole Position

Have you ever seen your cat hold the tail straight up in a rigid manner? Some refer to this position as the “flagpole.” It means that your cat is feeling self-assured and confident.

 

The Curve

When a cat holds the tail in a gentle curve, it usually means that your cat is feeling amused and playful. Some say the tail looks almost like a question mark in this position. Oblige your feline friend—give her some toys or a vigorous petting session.

 

The Wrap

Cats often wrap their tails around their owners’ legs as they pass by. Some cats have even been known to wrap the tail around other cats. This is similar to the way we wrap an arm around a loved one; it’s your cat’s way of showing she cares!

 

Remember that all cats are different; your cat may have her own unique personality and communication quirks. Talk to your veterinarians Ellicott City, MD for more information.

Common Cat Toxins

Our feline friends are susceptible to household poisons, just like many other pets. Here, your Mt. Pleasant, SC veterinarian tells you about three of the most common offenders and how to avoid the trouble.

Cleaning Supplies

Everything from household disinfectants, toilet bowl cleaner, and carpet shampoo to bleach, furniture polish, and air freshener can harm a cat who manages to swallow it. Never allow your pet access to cleaning supplies, and move them elsewhere if you’re using something that gives off strong fumes.

Human Medications

Many human medicines—antidepressants, various NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), prescription pills, cough syrup, over-the-counter medications, and more—aren’t good for cats. Don’t leave your medicine cabinet open, and store your cat’s medications separately from your own.

Poisonous Plants

One of the most dangerous plant poisons out there for cats is the lily flower. In addition to lilies, plenty of other plant varieties like ivy, oleander, azalea/rhododendron, dieffenbachia, elephant ear, aloe plants, and the sago palm aren’t safe for cats. Check your home and landscaping for any dangerous plants and flowers, and remove them if necessary.

Want more advice on keeping your cat safe from common toxins? Call your vet in Vets Mt. Pleasant, SC a call.

Maintaining Your Cat’s Dental Health

Did you know that dental problems are some of the most common health concerns that veterinarians treat amongst domesticated cats? It’s especially common in the senior cat population. Use these tips from a Greensboro, NC vet to maintain Fluffy’s dental health.

Watch for Behavioral Signs

Keep a close eye on your cat’s behavior. Cats suffering from dental disease, rotting teeth, or other ailments may shy away from attention, act out aggressively, vocalize loudly, refuse to eat, or eliminate in the house. Behavioral indicators like these may mean that your cat has a medical problem, so let your vet know.

Feed a Quality Diet

Good dental health—and overall well-being—starts with a good diet. Feed your cat a well-balanced feline food that is appropriate for her age, weight, and body condition. Ask your vet for a recommendation.

Visit the Vet

One of the best ways to maintain your cat’s dental health is by visiting your veterinarian on a regular basis. This way, your vet can check your cat’s dental well-being and treat any issues early on, before they’re allowed to get worse.

Set up an appointment today at your veterinary clinic Greensboro, NC for all of your cat’s healthcare needs.

Helping Your Cat Lose Weight

Is your cat overweight? Nearly half of all domesticated felines are! If your cat needs to lose weight, follow these guidelines from a Marietta, GA vet:

Portion Control

Portion control is essential for weight loss. Follow the directions on your cat’s food packaging, or talk to your veterinarian to get a recommendation on proper portion size. Don’t free-feed your cat; this is when food is left out constantly for cats to eat as they please. It’s a recipe for obesity!

Exercise

There’s no substitute for regular exercise when it comes to losing weight. Get your cat moving on a daily basis—use toys or a laser light to prompt her. Cat towers are also effective for allowing your cat to jump between platforms. Ask your vet about other great ways to give your cat a workout.

Treat Tips

Do you find yourself slipping Fluffy treats for no real reason? This is only providing empty calories. Try to give your cat treats only as a reward for good behavior, for training purposes, or as the very occasional indulgence.

If your cat needs help losing weight, call your Vet Marietta, GA to set up a weight-loss plan made specifically for her.

Why Isn’t My Cat Using Her Bathroom?

Did you know that about one in every 10 cats will develop a litterbox aversion at one point or another? If your feline friend seems to be shunning her bathroom, you’ll have to find out why. Learn more here from your Olathe, KS vet.

Box Placement

Cats are picky about where their bathrooms are located. They prefer quiet, out-of-the-way locales to do their business, just as we humans do. Usually, a basement or bathroom works well to provide your cat with peace and quiet.

Litter Preference

There are many types of litters out there: clumping and non-clumping, scented and non-scented, various coarseness options… the list goes on and on. You may have to experiment a bit to see what type of litter Fluffy prefers. Ask your vet to recommend a type and brand.

Negative Conditioning

Some cats were startled while using the litter box when they were young; this may have conditioned them against boxes as an adult. This may take a professional’s handiwork to correct, so give your veterinarian call for further advice.

Your vet clinic Olathe, KS is here to help you with any further questions you have regarding your cat’s health, care, and behavior. Call the office today!

Three Cat Myths You Shouldn’t Believe

Our cats can be fairly mysterious. In fact, you may already believe things about them that aren’t entirely accurate! Below, your Hinesville, GA vet discusses three prevalent cat myths and sets the record straight.

Cats Always Land on Their Feet

This isn’t true—cats don’t have a built-in gyroscope to right themselves, and they can slip and fall like any other pet. In fact, shorter falls are even more dangerous because a cat typically doesn’t have enough time to right themselves.

Cats and Milk Go Together

Milk and our feline friends just seem to fit together, but it’s not exactly a match made in heaven. The truth is, most adult cats are lactose-intolerant, meaning they can’t digest milk and other dairy properly. Too much dairy will probably result in vomiting, diarrhea, or an upset stomach at the very least.

Cats Purr When Happy

This is only a half-truth. Cats may purr when feeling content, yes, but many experts believe that purring can indicate a variety of other emotions as well, including anxiety and fear!

Would you like further insight into your cat’s behavior? Does your feline friend need professional veterinary care? Give your animal hospital Hinesville, GA a call today.

Setting the Record Straight on Cat Myths

Our feline friends can be a little mysterious. Maybe that’s why so many people have misconceptions about them! Here, your Sun Prairie, WI vet tells you the truth about three common cat myths.

Cats Love Milk

Well, cats may love milk. Milk, however, won’t love them back! The vast majority of adult cats are lactose-intolerant, meaning they can’t digest milk properly and will likely experience vomiting and diarrhea if too much dairy is ingested at one time.

Cats Always Land on Their Feet

This couldn’t be further from the truth. While our cats are graceful, they’re just as likely to fall as any other pet. In fact, shorter falls are the most dangerous because cats don’t have the time to right themselves before impact.

Cats Purr When They’re Happy

This is a half-truth. Cats may purr to express happiness and contentment, yes, but purring is thought to indicate a variety of other emotions as well. Some experts believe that purring may actually indicate fear, nervousness, anxiety, or stress in many cats!

Do you have questions about your cat’s behavior? Does your feline friend need a professional veterinary examination? Set up an appointment today at your veterinarian Sun Prairie, WI.

Giving Your Kitten a Bath

It’s a good idea to get your kitten used to bath time early on in life—this way, he’ll grow up with bathing as a natural part of life. Here, your Mt. Pleasant, SC veterinarian gives you a step-by-step guide for bathing your young feline friend.

Gather Supplies

First, gather everything you’ll need. This includes a feline-formulated shampoo (available at pet supply stores and certain retail outlets), a large soft towel, and a few pet treats. Set yourself up at the tub or the kitchen sink, and consider putting down a rubber mat to help your kitty maintain his footing.

Rinse and Lather

Wet your kitten’s coat, taking care to avoid getting water in the eyes, nose, mouth, and ears. Now, dab a small amount of the shampoo into your cat’s coat and begin massaging it through the fur. Work from the neck downward.

Rinse, Dry, and Reward

Once your kitten has been thoroughly shampooed, rinse the coat out with fresh water. Now, dry them with the towel. Slip your kitty a few treats after bath time; this will help him learn that bathing is a positive experience.

Call your vet clinic Mt. Pleasant, SC for more great bathing tips.