Category Archives: Cats care

Indoor Cat Exercise Tips

Do you have an indoor cat? It’s important to get them the exercise they need. Use these tips from an Omaha, NE veterinary professional to get your feline friend moving.

Cat Tower

Cat tower structures are great for getting your cat exercise, and cats are able to play on them whenever they’d like—even when you’re not home. These items have multiple levels and often come with built-in toys and scratching posts. Purchase one at your local pet supply store or retail outlet.

Toys

Cat toys provide your feline friend with hours of fun. What she may not realize is that she’s also getting healthy exercise in the process! Make sure your cat has a rotating selection of fun toys to keep her occupied and active.

Walks

Not all cats are keen on walking, but some enjoy it quite a bit. It can provide your indoor cat with a fun excursion into the great outdoors, and it provides good exercise. Talk to your vet for advice on choosing a cat harness and on getting started with walks.

Contact Your Pet Clinic Omaha, NE is here to help with all of your feline friend’s healthcare needs. Make an appointment at the office today!

Don’t Believe These Three Cat Myths

Cats aren’t quite as forthcoming as dogs—in fact, they can be downright mysterious at times! For that reason, there are several myths that many believe about our feline friends. Your Greenville, SC vet clears up the confusion below:

Cats Always Land on Their Feet

This isn’t true. Cats, like any animal, can slip and fall, potentially injuring themselves seriously. In fact, shorter falls are even more dangerous, since cats don’t have time to right themselves before impact.

Cats Purr When Happy

This is a partial truth—cats may indeed purr when happy, but many experts believe that purring can also indicate a wide variety of other emotions. Purring may even be used to express fear, anxiety, or anger!

Cats Love Milk

Cats and milk just seem to go together, but it’s actually not a very good idea. Most adult cats are actually lactose-intolerant, meaning that they can’t digest milk and other dairy properly. Drinking too much milk will most likely result in vomiting, diarrhea, or an upset stomach at the very least.

Do you have further questions about your cat’s health and wellness? We are here to help! Call your Veterinarians Greenville, SC office today to make an appointment.

Responding to Your Cat’s Hairballs

Since cats groom themselves with their tongues, ingesting some hair and regurgitating it in the form of a hairball is a natural part of life. Sometimes, though, hairballs can get out of hand! Learn what to do below from your Rochester, NY veterinarian.

See Your Vet

If your cat seems to be producing a lot of hairballs, it’s best to set up an appointment at your vet’s office to be safe. This way, your vet can examine your cat and determine if any health issues are present. If nothing is wrong, he or she can advise you further moving forward.

Feed a Quality Diet

Feeding a great diet helps to keep your cat’s digestive system functioning normally, allowing the system to get rid of much of your cat’s ingested hair in the feces. Ask your vet to recommend a premium diet that is appropriate for your cat’s nutritional needs—you might be surprised at the difference it makes!

Hairball Products

There are various products available on the market—gels, digestive lubricants, etc.—designed to promote hair flow through your cat’s digestive tract. Ask your Animal Hospital Rochester, NY for a recommendation and visit your local pet supply shop to purchase one.

The Benefits of Microchipping Your Cat

Pet identification is extremely important, and having your cat outfitted with a microchip is one of the best ways to identify her properly. Here, your Mt. Pleasant, SC veterinarian tells you about the major benefits of microchipping your feline friend:

Security of Identification

Your cat won’t be able to remove her microchip the way she might be able to remove a collar with ID tags. This way, you don’t have to worry about her staying identified, even if she escapes your home unexpectedly!

Easy to Have Updated

You don’t have to purchase an entirely new microchip if you move or get a new phone number. All you have to do is contact the microchip manufacturer and have them update your cat’s contact information. Your cat won’t even have to leave home!

Quick and Painless

The microchipping procedure only takes a moment, and it’s virtually painless for your cat. The microchip inserted under the skin using a specialized syringe, and all Fluffy will feel is a slight pinch before the whole thing is over.

Do you have questions about microchipping your cat? Ready to outfit your feline companion with one? Set up an appointment at your Vets Mt. Pleasant, SC.

Creating an Emergency Care Kit for Your Pet

It’s best to be prepared for emergencies ahead of time—that’s truly the best way to respond to them properly! It’s a wonderful idea to create a pet-specific emergency kit. Learn what to include below from an Omaha, NE vet.

First-Aid Supplies

Most of your pet’s kit will be comprised of first-aid essentials like gauze, bandages, a pet-safe disinfectant, adhesive tape, tweezers, scissors, a pet thermometer, a few soft towels, a styptic powder or pen to stop bleeding, nail clippers, and a few pairs of latex gloves for your hands. Ask your veterinarian what other first-aid items you may want to include.

Medical Records

In a waterproof plastic bag, pack proof of ownership, documentation of any recent medical work your pet has had performed, documents pertaining to ongoing conditions your pet manages, and records of vaccination. These documents can be critical if you have to take your animal companion to an unfamiliar vet’s office or shelter facility!

Pet Meds

Does your pet take medications for an illness or condition? Pack a supply in your emergency kit, and check expiration dates regularly.

Would you like help building your pet’s emergency healthcare kit? Give talk your veterinarian Omaha, NE professional a call today.

Grooming Your Cat

Cats are fairly good at grooming themselves, but that doesn’t mean they can’t use a little help once in a while. Here, your Lawrenceville, GA veterinarian goes over your cat’s basic grooming requirements.

Brushing

Regular brushing will help remove loose hair from your cat’s coat, saving her from ingesting it and coughing up a hairball. It also spreads essential skin oils through the fur to moisturize it naturally. Ask your vet to recommend a feline-specific brush for your cat’s needs.

Bathing

The occasional bath is helpful for keeping your cat’s coat clean, or for freshening her up if she gets into something smelly or sticky. It’s best to get your cat started with bathing when she’s still a kitten; this way, she grows up with baths as a normal part of life. Always use a feline-formulated shampoo, available at pet supply stores and certain retail outlets.

Nail Trims

Use a trimmer made specifically for cats when trimming your feline friend’s nails. Keep a styptic powder or pen on hand to staunch any bleeding that results from cutting the nails too short.

If you would like a veterinary professional to handle your cat’s grooming needs, call your pet clinic Lawrenceville, GA.

Can I Give My Cat Milk?

Have you ever given your feline friend milk? You might be surprised to find out that milk isn’t good for most cats! Here, your Orangevale, CA veterinarian tells you more.

Why Can’t Cats Drink Milk?

The majority of cats are actually lactose-intolerant, just like some humans are. This means that they don’t possess enough lactase in the gut to digest lactose, milk’s major enzyme. Drinking too much milk will surely result in an upset stomach, if not diarrhea and vomiting. It’s not worth the risk!

Don’t Kittens Need Milk?

Yes, kittens require their mother’s milk (or a formula substitute if the mother isn’t around) when they’re young. This is the only time in a cat’s life, though, that they’ll need milk of any kind. As kittens grow, they produce less and less lactase, becoming lactose-intolerant by the time they’re adults.

Is Other Dairy Safe for Cats?

Because other forms of dairy like yogurt and cheese contain smaller amounts of lactose than milk, they’re a bit safer for cats. They’re not nutritionally necessary in the least, though—it’s safest to avoid giving your cat dairy of any kind.

Talk to your Vets Orangevale, CA for more information on your cat’s diet.

Milk, Dairy, and Our Housecats

For whatever reason, cats and milk just seem to pair together. Believe it or not, the two don’t mix! Learn more below from a vet in Myakka, FL.

Why Shouldn’t Cats Have Milk?

Most adult cats are lactose-intolerant, meaning that they can’t properly digest lactose, the primary enzyme of milk and other dairy foods. This is the same condition that many humans suffer from! When a cat drinks too much milk, an upset stomach, vomiting, or diarrhea is likely to result.

Don’t Kittens Need Milk?

Yes, kittens require milk from their mother or a milk-formula substitute when they are young. This is the only time in a cat’s life, however, that milk is necessary. Cats generally grow more and more lactose-intolerant as they age, and won’t take kindly to milk once they’re fully grown.

What About Other Dairy?

Since other dairy products—yogurt, cheese, etc.—contain less lactose than pure milk, they may not cause problems as quickly as milk does. However, dairy is not a nutritional necessity for any adult cat. Keep the portion size extremely small if you must give your cat a dairy treat!

Contact your Vet Myakka, FL for more information on your cat’s dietary needs.

Your Cat’s Tail Communications

Did you know that one of the primary ways that cats communicate (aside from vocalizations, which they use almost exclusively for us!) is by the tail? Learn about your cat’s tail communications below from an Ellicott City, MD vet.

 

Flagpole Position

Have you ever seen your cat hold the tail straight up in a rigid manner? Some refer to this position as the “flagpole.” It means that your cat is feeling self-assured and confident.

 

The Curve

When a cat holds the tail in a gentle curve, it usually means that your cat is feeling amused and playful. Some say the tail looks almost like a question mark in this position. Oblige your feline friend—give her some toys or a vigorous petting session.

 

The Wrap

Cats often wrap their tails around their owners’ legs as they pass by. Some cats have even been known to wrap the tail around other cats. This is similar to the way we wrap an arm around a loved one; it’s your cat’s way of showing she cares!

 

Remember that all cats are different; your cat may have her own unique personality and communication quirks. Talk to your veterinarians Ellicott City, MD for more information.

Common Cat Toxins

Our feline friends are susceptible to household poisons, just like many other pets. Here, your Mt. Pleasant, SC veterinarian tells you about three of the most common offenders and how to avoid the trouble.

Cleaning Supplies

Everything from household disinfectants, toilet bowl cleaner, and carpet shampoo to bleach, furniture polish, and air freshener can harm a cat who manages to swallow it. Never allow your pet access to cleaning supplies, and move them elsewhere if you’re using something that gives off strong fumes.

Human Medications

Many human medicines—antidepressants, various NSAIDs (non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs), prescription pills, cough syrup, over-the-counter medications, and more—aren’t good for cats. Don’t leave your medicine cabinet open, and store your cat’s medications separately from your own.

Poisonous Plants

One of the most dangerous plant poisons out there for cats is the lily flower. In addition to lilies, plenty of other plant varieties like ivy, oleander, azalea/rhododendron, dieffenbachia, elephant ear, aloe plants, and the sago palm aren’t safe for cats. Check your home and landscaping for any dangerous plants and flowers, and remove them if necessary.

Want more advice on keeping your cat safe from common toxins? Call your vet in Vets Mt. Pleasant, SC a call.