Category Archives: Cats care

Your Cat’s Hairballs

Hairballs are a part of life for most cat owners. Have you ever wondered if they’re safe for your feline companion? Below, your Livonia, MI vet covers the basics of Fluffy’s hairballs.

Why Do Hairballs Occur?

Cats ingest loose hair while grooming themselves; tiny barbs on the tongue pick it up, and your cat swallows it. Most of this swallowed hair passes through the digestive tract and gets expelled naturally in the feces, but some remains in the gut. This hair eventually clumps into a hairball, which is regurgitated by your cat.

Do Hairballs Cause Any Harm?

No, the occasional hairball shouldn’t cause your cat any harm. However, if your cat is gagging and retching but not producing a hairball, she could have a blocked airway—rush your pet to the emergency room. Additionally, vomiting is not the same as producing a hairball. If your cat is vomiting consistently, it’s time to see the vet.

Can I Lessen the Frequency of Hairballs?

Feed your cat a healthy diet; it will aid in digestive function and move hair through the gut properly. Brush your cat yourself to remove loose fur from her coat.

Call your veterinarian Livonia, MI to learn more!

Cats and Milk Don’t Mix!

Cats and milk might seem like a match made in heaven. Did you know that this pairing is not as idyllic as it may seem? Learn more below from your vet in Fort Collins, CO.

Why Can’t Cats Drink Milk?

Most adult cats are lactose-intolerant, just like many humans can be. This means that the cat can’t properly digest lactose, the main enzyme found in milk. Too much milk, and your cat will likely experience an upset stomach, vomiting, or diarrhea!

Don’t Kittens Need Milk?

Yes, newborn kittens will require their mother’s milk—or a substitute milk product—for the proper growth in the early stages of life. As a cat ages, though, they begin to produce less and less lactase in the gut, meaning that they gradually become more and more lactose-intolerant.

Is Any Dairy Safe for Cats?

Other types of dairy like yogurt or cheese contain less lactose than milk, so your cat might respond better to those foods. However, no dairy is nutritionally necessary for cats! If you must give Fluffy dairy foods as a treat, keep the portions extremely small to be safe.

For more information on your cat’s diet, call your vet Fort Collins, CO.

Hairballs 101

If you own a cat, hairballs are probably a part of life. Have you ever wondered why your cat expels hairballs, and if they’re safe? Learn more below from a vet in Rochester, NY.

How Do Hairballs Form?

Cats ingest hair when they groom themselves. Most of that hair moves through the digestive tract and gets expelled in the feces, but some of it remains in the gut. That hair will eventually be regurgitated in the form of a hairball.

Are Hairballs Dangerous?

The occasional hairball is perfectly natural and shouldn’t cause your cat any harm. However, if your cat is expelling hairballs frequently, it’s worth a trip to the vet’s office. Also, if your cat is retching and gagging but not producing a hairball, it may be stuck in the trachea—rush your pet to the emergency room.

Can I Limit My Cat’s Hairballs?

Ask your veterinarian about simple diet changes or dietary supplements that can help your cat’s hair move through the digestive tract more smoothly. However, grooming your cat yourself is the best way to reduce hairballs—by trapping hair in the brush, your cat ingests less!

more information on hairballs, call your pet clinic Rochester, NY.

Insurance for Your Cat

You have insurance for your home, car, health, and more. Did you know that you can also insure your cat’s health? Below, learn about pet insurance and whether or not it may be a good choice for your cat as your vet Isle of Palms, SC tells you more:

How Does Pet Insurance Work?

Pet insurance works like other insurance that you’re used to. You’ll have a set deductible to reach before the insurance starts paying, and you’ll pay a monthly or yearly premium. Be sure to research particular plans’ stipulations, limitations, etc. to know exactly what you’re paying for—there are various types of pet insurance coverage!

Why Get My Cat Insurance?

Insurance may be especially helpful for cats who have pre-existing health problems, senior cats, young kittens who are prone to accidents or injury, or any other cat who is expected to need veterinary services often. It’s the same benefit as that of other insurance types—if you have unexpected veterinary bills, you’ll have help with the costs!

How Do I Get Started?

Talk to your Isle of Palms, SC veterinarian to find out if pet insurance is a good idea for your cat. We’re here to help!

Lily Poisoning in Your Cat

Did you know that the lily flower is a dangerous toxin for cats? Many of our feline friends like to munch on plant life! Learn more about the symptoms of lily poisoning and how to prevent the issue from a vet Lafayette, LA.

What Lilies Are Poisonous?

Not every variety of lily is poisonous. Some common offenders include Easter lilies, calla lilies, daylilies, Asiatic lilies, tiger lilies, and lily of the valley. All things considered, it’s safest to avoid keeping lilies of any kind in your home if you own a cat.

What Are the Symptoms of Poisoning, and How Is It Treated?

Signs of lily poisoning include irritation in the mouth, increased urination or a lack of urination, appetite loss, and vomiting. Treatment may require administration of activated charcoal to slow the toxin’s absorption, as well as induced vomiting, fluid replacement, and more.

How Can Poisoning Be Prevented?

Obviously, you’ll want to prevent lily poisoning in the first place rather than deal with it after the fact. Make sure to check floral arrangements and bouquets in your home; remove lilies wherever you find them.

For more advice on lilies and your cat, call your veterinarians Lafayette, LA.

Your Cat, Milk, and Other Dairy

Cats and milk seem like a natural match. You’re probably already picturing a cat lapping up milk from a saucer! Did you know that cats and milk don’t actually mix? Your Rochester, NY vet tells you more below.

Why Isn’t Milk Good for Cats?

Most adult cats are lactose-intolerant, just like many humans are. This means that they can’t properly digest lactose, the main enzyme found in milk. Although a small amount of milk isn’t likely to do any harm, don’t overdo it—your cat will experience an upset stomach, diarrhea, or vomiting!

Don’t Kittens Need Milk?

Kittens do require their mother’s milk (or a synthetic substitute) during the nursing stage. As they get older, though, they gradually become more and more lactose-intolerant.

What About Other Dairy Products?

Milk has the most lactose out of dairy products, so other dairy foods like cheese or yogurt can be a bit safer to feed to your cat. However, they’re not nutritionally necessary, and your cat may not even bother tasting them anyway! It’s always safest to stick to your feline friend’s normal diet.

Would you like more advice on your cat’s nutritional needs? Call your veterinarian Rochester NY today for help.

How to Improve Your Cat’s Dull Coat

Is your feline friend’s coat looking a bit lackluster? It’s not uncommon for our cats to experience a dull coat now and then. Here, your Frisco, TX vet tells you how to get your cat’s coat back to its former shine.

Upgrade the Diet

If a cat doesn’t receive the right nutrients through food, the skin and fur quality will be one of the first things to suffer. Many times, upgrading your cat’s diet is all that’s needed to vastly improve the coat quality! Talk to your vet for a recommendation on a high-quality feline diet.

Brush and Bathe

Brush your cat regularly; it’ll spread essential skin oils through the fur to moisturize it naturally. Bathing is another good way to keep your cat’s fur clean and grime-free. These standard grooming methods are great for cats who need a little help keeping themselves prim and proper!

See Your Vet

If your cat’s coat is drastically dull, it may be time to see your veterinarian. Medical issues, such as skin infection or parasites, could be to blame! You’ll want to have these problems addressed immediately.

Call your vet Frisco, TX to set up an appointment today for your feline friend.

Explaining Your Cat’s Problem With Her Litterbox

Has your cat seemingly given up on her litterbox, eliminating outside on your carpets or floors? Many cats will develop a litterbox aversion at one point or another—learn about the possible reasons from your Lafayette, LA vet.

Placement

What cat wants to do their business in a noisy, crowded locale? Place Fluffy’s bathroom in a quiet, out-of-the-way area like an upstairs bathroom or basement, where she can use the restroom in peace. This way, she’ll be much more prone to continue using the box!

Cleanliness

Much like you, your cat doesn’t like to use a dirty bathroom over and over again. Make sure to clean your cat’s box, or she may shun it! Scoop the litterbox every day, and replace the litter entirely about once a week to maintain maximum freshness.

Litter Type

Different cats like different kinds of litter. Try out clumping and non-clumping, scented and non-scented, different granule sizes, and more.

If you still can’t seem to get your cat to use her litterbox, set up an appointment at the vet’s office. It’s possible that medical issues are the root cause of your cat’s behavior! Call your vets Lafayette, LA today to speak with the professionals.

Heartworm Infestation in Cats

We most often think of our canine companions as the ones who get heartworm. While heartworm is definitely more common amongst dogs, cats can also be infested! Learn more here from a vet in Rochester, NY.

How Do Cats Get Heartworm?

Cats get heartworm the same way that dogs do: from the bite of an infected mosquito. Mosquitoes bite an infected animal, then transmit the heartworm’s larvae—microscopic baby worms known as microfilaria—to a host.

What are the Symptoms?

Some cats may not show any symptoms at all even if they’re infected with adult heartworms; many times, the first sign in these cases is sudden collapse or death. If a cat does exhibit symptoms, though, they may include coughing fits, weight loss and lack of appetite, or occasional vomiting.

What’s the Treatment?

There isn’t a heartworm drug available for cats the way there is for dogs. Stabilization is the preferred treatment route, allowing your cat’s system to expel the worms on its own while closely monitoring your pet’s health.

Prevention is, of course, much more desirable than treatment—call your vets Rochester, NY office to get your cat set up on a monthly heartworm preventative. Better safe than sorry!

Three Common Cat Misconceptions

When it comes to cats, it’s important that you don’t believe everything you hear. There are many misconceptions floating around about our feline friends! Below, your pet clinic Livonia, MI sets the record straight on three of the most common myths:

Cats Always Land Upright

Cats don’t always land on their feet, no matter how graceful and poised they may seem. It’s entirely possible for cats to slip and fall of off high ledges or windowsills, injuring themselves quite seriously. Shorter falls are even more dangerous because cats may not have time to right themselves!

Cats Love Milk

This is a partial truth. Cats might love milk, but milk won’t show them the same affection in return! It turns out that most adult cats are lactose-intolerant, and drinking too much milk will result in vomiting or diarrhea.

Cats Purr When They’re Happy

While it’s true that cats might purr when they’re happy, they can also purr to express a variety of other emotions. Experts believe that cats might even purr to convey anxiety or anger!

Want more information on your cat’s behavior or health care needs? We’re here to help. Contact your vet clinic Livonia, MI today to set up an appointment.