Category Archives: Cats care

Finding a Lost Cat

No one wants to think about their cat escaping. IF your feline friend manages to slip out, though, what do you do? Here are a few tips from a Frisco, TX vet.

In Your Yard

If you can’t immediately find your cat in your yard, try going out at about 2:00 a.m. with a few cats treats or a can of food. Even if your cat has ventured out of the yard, he or she may hear the sound in the quiet of the night and return to your yard.

Putting Up Flyers

If your cat is gone for longer than a full day, you might want to post flyers around your neighborhood. Include your contact information, and even consider offering a small reward. Enlisting the public’s help is one of the best ways to find your lost cat!

Preventing the Problem

Prevent the problem initially by being extremely cautious when coming and going from your home. Make sure all windows contain sturdy screens. Keep your cat’s identification updated in the form of a microchip, ID tags on the collar, or both.

Does your cat need identification measures? We’re here to help. Contact your vet clinic Frisco, TX right away.

Fluffy’s Aversion to the Litter Box

Has your cat been using the bathroom on your carpets and floors, instead of in her litter box? Litter box aversions aren’t uncommon; almost one in every 10 cats will experience it! Here, your veterinarian Las Vegas, NV tells you about three possible causes.

Placement

Your cat tends to be quite picky about where her litter box is located. Place it too close to food and water, or in a crowded area of the house, and she might not use it at all! It’s best to put the box in a quiet, calm area where your cat won’t be disturbed while using her bathroom.

Cleanliness

Clean your cat’s bathroom out regularly. Cats have been known to stop using their bathroom entirely if it’s not clean! Scoop out your cat’s waste on a daily basis, adding a bit of fresh litter to make up the difference, and change the litter entirely about once a week.

Medical Concerns

Medical problems like disease, injury, or stress could be the root cause of your cat’s aversion to the litter box. If you think your cat could be suffering, make an appointment at the vet’s office.

Contact your veterinarian Las Vegas, NV to learn more.

Milk and Your Cat

Did you know that milk and cats—however great of a mix they may seem—don’t actually go together very well? Too much milk will almost certainly make your cat sick! Learn more here from a Tampa, FL veterinarian.

Why Can’t My Cat Drink Milk?

Most adult cats are actually lactose-intolerant. This means that they don’t have enough lactase in the gut to digest lactose, the main enzyme of milk. Drinking too much milk, or other dairy, will probably result in vomiting or diarrhea!

What About Kittens?

Kittens do need their mother’s milk, or a synthetic substitute if the mother’s milk isn’t available, for proper growth in the early stages of life. As they age, though, a kitten starts to produce less lactase. By the time they’re fully grown, a cat will most likely be lactose-intolerant and doesn’t need any milk at all.

What Can I Give My Cat?

Your cat needs one liquid to stay healthy: fresh water. If you want to give your cat milk, try a specially formulated “cat milk,” which has had the lactose removed to make it safe for your feline friend.

To learn more about your cat’s dietary needs, call your vet Tampa, FL.

Three Reasons to Keep Your Cat Indoors

Do you keep your cat indoors? It’s a good idea for your pet’s health and safety—indoor cats tend to live much longer than those who venture outside! Here, your Plano, TX veterinarian tells you about three reasons to keep Fluffy inside:

Indoor Cats Are Less Likely to Contract Parasites

Although indoor cats can also contract fleas, ticks, and worms, it’s less likely than it is for an outdoor cat to come down with an infestation or infection. Avoid the troubles associated with these pets by keeping your cat inside and on quality preventative medications.

Indoor Cats Are at a Lower Risk of Poisoning

Outdoor cats might come across antifreeze, pesticides, rodent or insect poisons, fertilizers, and other chemical products that could poison them. Avoid these dangers entirely by keeping your cat inside! Indoors, you can control the environment and keep potential toxins far out of your cat’s reach.

Indoor Cats Won’t Be Struck By Vehicles

When your cat stays indoors, he or she won’t run the risk of getting hit by a car. Vehicle strikes are one of the leading causes of outdoor cat deaths!

To learn more about indoor cat care, contact your veterinary clinic Plano, TX today.

Obesity in Cats

Many of our feline friends are overweight; nearly half, in fact. It’s a serious problem that is about much more than a few extra pounds! Here, your veterinarian Rochester, NY tells you more.

Dangers of Obesity

Your cat’s excess weight can start to put more pressure on joints, making arthritis more likely. Obesity can also begin to affect digestive and respiratory organs, and ultimately shorten a cat’s lifespan!

Treating Obesity

Treating an obese cat will involve a tailored weight-loss plan. See your veterinarian if you think your cat is overweight; you’ll probably need to adjust Fluffy’s portion size, and you may need to upgrade her to a premium diet or a diet made specifically for weight-loss. Exercise is the other half of the equation—get your cat moving on a daily basis with playtime!

Preventing Obesity

Prevent obesity in the first place by feeding your cat in proper serving sizes and exercising her regularly. Ask your vet for a recommendation on a great diet choice, and ask about a measured portion size. Additionally, don’t overdo treats or fatty table scraps.

Need help getting your cat to lose weight? We are here for you! Call your animal hospital Rochester, NY today.

Fluffy’s Hairballs

Have you ever seen your cat cough up a hairball? It’s not very pleasant looking, and it’s definitely no fun to clean up. Below, your veterinarians Marietta, GA tells you everything you need to know about your cat’s hairball production.

What Causes Hairballs?

When your cat grooms herself, barbs lining the tongue pick up loose hair from the coat. Your cat swallows this hair, and most of it moves through the digestive tract and gets expelled in the feces. Some hair remains in the gut, though, and clumps together in a hairball—that eventually gets coughed up, along with some stomach fluid.

Are Hairballs Dangerous?

No, the occasional hairball is perfectly normal for a healthy cat. However, if your cat is coughing up hairballs frequently, or if they’re gagging and retching without actually producing a hairball, you’ll want to have them see the vet right away.

Can I Help My Cat Cough Up Fewer Hairballs?

Yes, there are a few steps you can take to minimize hairball production. First, feed Fluffy a great diet to keep the coat healthy and minimize shedding. Secondly, brush your cat daily to remove loose hair.

To learn more, call your animal hospital Marietta, GA.

Age-Appropriate Diet Choices for Cats

A cat’s nutritional needs, much like your own, change over time. It’s important to realize that a kitten’s dietary requirements are much different than a senior cat’s! Your Tampa, FL veterinarian gives a breakdown of age-appropriate diet choices in this article:

Kittens

Newborn kittens will require the mother’s milk—or a synthetic substitute milk if the mother’s milk isn’t available—for proper growth early on in life. Young kittens can be fed a wet kitten food until transitioning to dry food after a few months. Work closely with your vet to get your kitten’s food choice correct.

Adult Cats

An adult cat should be fed a nutritionally balanced, high-quality cat food that provides all of the right vitamins, minerals, proteins, and other nutrients for a healthy life. Don’t give your adult cat a “budget” food that contains a lot of filler material—that’s only packing on extra calories that your cat doesn’t need.

Senior Felines

Senior cats have special nutritional requirements to remain healthy in the last years of life. Ask your vet to recommend a great senior diet choice for your aging feline friend.

To learn more about your cat’s dietary and nutritional needs, contact your vet Tampa, FL.

Do Hairballs Hurt My Cat?

Have you ever seen your cat cough up a hairball? It’s a part of life for most cats, but is it harmful in any way? Your vet clinic Washington DC is here to answer your questions.

Why Do Hairballs Occur?

Your cat grooms herself on a regular basis, and her tongue picks up loose hair from the coat. Your cat swallows this hair, and most of it moves through the digestive tract and gets expelled in the feces. Some remains in the gut, though, and clumps together into a hairball. That hairball is eventually regurgitated.

Are Hairballs Harmful?

The occasional hairball is perfectly normal and won’t harm your cat. However, if your cat’s hairball production has increased dramatically, it could be a sign of health trouble. If you see your cat retching and gagging, but not actually producing a hairball, see your vet promptly; your cat might be choking.

Can I Help My Cat Have Fewer Hairballs?

Feed your cat a high-quality diet to keep the skin and fur healthy, minimizing shedding at the outset. Brush Fluffy daily to trap loose fur and prevent it from falling all over your home.

Call your animal hospital Washington DC today for more information.

Why Your Cat Has Given Up on Her Litterbox

Did you know that about one in every 10 cats will have some sort of aversion to their litterbox at one point or another? If your cat has seemingly given up on her bathroom, it’s time to act. Here, your veterinarian London, ON describes three common reasons for this and what you can do about it.

Cleanliness

No one likes a dirty bathroom, your cat included. A dirty box is one of the leading reasons for litterbox avoidance! Scoop out Fluffy’s waste on a daily basis, and change the litter entirely about once a week. This will keep things fresh and clean, meaning your cat is more likely to use her bathroom properly.

Placement

Like you, your cat doesn’t enjoy being disturbed while using the bathroom. Place Fluffy’s box in a quiet, out-of-the-way part of the house where she can do her business in peace. If your cat is startled frequently while using her bathroom, she may decide to shun it entirely.

Medical Concerns

Medical concerns—urinary tract infections, injury, and much more—can cause a cat to avoid their litterbox and eliminate outside of it. Contact your vet clinic London, ON right away if you think your cat is ill!

How to Lengthen Your Cat’s Lifespan

Your cat offers you and your family years of unbridled joy, companionship, and love. Why not extend that for as long as possible? Below, your veterinarian Rochester, NY tells you about three ways to lengthen Fluffy’s lifespan.

See the Vet

Have your cat examined at the vet’s office on a regular basis. This way, your veterinarian can ensure that your cat continues to remain healthy as the years go by, and any health concerns can be caught and treated early on. It’s recommended that your cat be seen by the vet at least twice a year.

Practice Preventative Care

Preventative care is essential for a long, healthy life. That means keeping your cat up-to-date on essential vaccinations, and having them wear a proper flea preventative. Talk to your veterinarian today if your cat is in need of these preventative measures. Your pet will thank you!

Feed a Great Diet

One of the best—and easiest—ways to lengthen your cat’s life is to feed them a great diet. When your cat gets all the proper nutrients through her food, all body systems stay healthy!

Want a recommendation on a proper diet for your cat? Contact your vet in Rochester, NY.