Category Archives: Cats care

The Truth Regarding Cats and Milk

Cats and milk just seem to mesh. You may be surprised to learn, though, that it’s a misconception! It turns out that cats shouldn’t drink milk at all. Learn more here from your Thorold, ON veterinarian.

Why Can’t Cats Drink Milk?

Most adult cats are actually lactose-intolerant, just like many humans. This means that they can’t properly digest lactose, milk’s main enzyme. If a cat drinks too much milk, they’ll experience an upset stomach at the very least, and vomiting or diarrhea is more likely!

Don’t Kittens Drink the Mother’s Milk?

Yes, kittens require their mother’s milk (or a synthetic substitute) during the nursing period. This is the only time in your cat’s life cycle, though, that milk is a nutritional necessity! As cat ages, they usually become more and more lactose-intolerant.

What About Other Dairy?

Since other dairy products like cheese or yogurt contain less lactose than milk, they’re a bit safer for cats. They’re not necessary in the least, though. If you must give your cat dairy products, keep the portion size extremely small!

Do you have questions about your cat’s dietary needs? Call the professionals at your veterinary clinic Thorold, ON. We are here to help!

Your Cat’s Dietary Needs

One of the easiest and most effective ways to keep your cat healthy for a lifetime is to feed them a high-quality diet. Your cat’s nutritional needs vary widely as she ages, though. Here, your Rochester, NY veterinarian gives you a crash course.

Kittens

Newborn kittens will require their mother’s milk for proper nutrition, or a milk substitute if the mother’s milk isn’t available. Gradually, kittens will start eating wet food and then can be transitioned to dry kibble as they get a bit older. Ask your vet for further specifics.

Adult Cats

Your adult cat should be eating a well-balanced premium diet made for middle-aged animals. This will give them all of the essential vitamins, minerals, proteins, and other nutrients necessary for a long, healthy life. Ask your veterinarian to recommend a great food choice for your adult cat.

Senior Cats

By the time your cat is a senior, her nutritional needs are quite different than they used to be. All aging cats should be fed a senior-specific diet to get the right balance of nutrients; ask your vet for his or her opinion.

For more information regarding your cat’s dietary needs, contact your veterinarians Rochester, NY today.

Understanding Your Cat’s Tail

One of the primary ways that your cat communicates is through her body language, and the tail helps to facilitate this. Have you ever wondered what your cat might be saying with her tail? Read on as your Fort Collins, CO vet offers some insight.

The Curve

Most of the time, you’ll see your cat’s tail held in a gentle curve. This is your cat’s “default” tail position, and it means that your pet is feeling relaxed, confident, and calm.

The Straight Position

You might see your cat hold the tail straight up in the air in a rigid manner; some refer to this position as the “flagpole.” It means that your cat is feeling poised and self-assured, and she’ll probably be up for a petting session or playtime. If you see the tail straightened but puffed, accompanied by wide eyes and hissing, your cat is upset and frightened—it’s best to get out of the way!

The Wrap

Cats have been known to wrap the tail around other pets or their owners; it’s a sign of affection, just like wrapping an arm around a loved one!

For more information on your cat’s behavior, call your veterinarian Fort Collins, CO.

The Basics of Catnip

How much do you really know about catnip and the way it affects our feline friends? Have you ever tried catnip on your pet? Learn more below as your Colorado Springs, CO vet goes over the basics.

What is Catnip, Anyway?

Catnip is a naturally occurring herb. It originated in Europe but has now spread all over the world. The wild catnip plant is a leafy green plant, characterized by white flowers with purple spots.

The catnip you’ll purchase in a pet store is a dried and processed version of the wild herb. There are also catnip sprays and toys available.

Why Does Catnip Affect Cats?       

The oils of the catnip plant contain a chemical called nepetalactone. It’s this substance that causes the reaction you see in cats. Experts believe that it induces a nearly sexual response in your cat’s brain—catnip is somewhat of an aphrodisiac to our feline friends!

Why Doesn’t My Cat Respond to Catnip?

Have you tried catnip out on your cat to no avail? Don’t worry—your pet is fine. Cats require a certain gene, inherited from their parents, to feel catnip’s effects.

For more information on catnip, call your animal hospital Colorado Springs, CO.

Feed Your Cat an Age-Appropriate Diet

The nutritional needs of cats vary greatly depending on their age. To find out specifics on your particular cat’s dietary requirements, read on as a Portland, OR veterinarian provides some insight.

Kittens

Very young kittens need their mother’s milk—or a synthetic milk product if the mother’s milk isn’t available—for the first weeks of life to grow up healthy and strong. As they age, they’ll transition into a commercially available kitten diet. Ask your vet to recommend a great choice.

Adult Cats

Your adult cat should be fed a well-balanced, nutritionally complete food that contains all the carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients needed for a healthy life. This is the best way to keep them as healthy as possible for as long as possible!

Senior Citizens

By the time your cat is a senior, they’ll need to be fed a specially formulated diet made just for older cats. Your veterinarian can give you more information on transitioning your cat to foods, and they can recommend a high-quality senior food choice.

Does your feline friend need veterinary attention? Do you have questions about Fluffy’s dietary requirements? Set up an appointment to see your veterinary Portland, OR professional.

Explaining Your Cat’s Kneading Behavior

In cats, kneading behavior is characterized by an alternated pressing of the front paws into a soft object; that object might be a pillow, a blanket, or your leg! If you’ve ever wondered why Fluffy does this, learn more below from a vet in Aurora, CO.

Territory Marking

Your cat’s paw pads contain scent glands, and your cat releases the scent when she kneads an object. In this fashion, she’s marking the object as her own in order to mark her territory. Consider it an honor if your cat kneads you—she might be claiming you as her own!

Napping Prep

You’ve undoubtedly seen your cat knead before napping. Many experts believe that the ancient ancestors of our domesticated cats kneaded grass or dirt in the wild in order to soften it up for bedding. Our current cats’ behavior might be linked to the actions of generations before!

Nursing Instinct

Kittens knead their mother’s belly during nursing in order to stimulate milk production. It’s possible that your adult cat associates the action of kneading with the positive feelings of nursing!

Do you have questions about your feline friend’s behavior? Contact your pet clinic Aurora, CO for help from the professionals.

Basic Kitten Care

Are you going to be bringing home a kitten in the near future? Use these basic care tips from a Rochester, NY veterinarian to make sure you’re prepared!

Diet

Your kitten will need a specially formulated kitten food, rather than normal cat food, until she’s a bit older. For extremely young kittens, synthetic milk formulas may be necessary. Talk to your veterinarian to find out about your kitten’s nutritional needs and get a recommendation on a proper food choice.

Litter Box

Make sure you have a litter box set up in a quiet, out-of-the-way part of the home for your kitten’s use. Placing them gently into the box initially should be sufficient to get them to use it, but ask your vet for more tips on litter-box training.

Safety Tips

Before kitty comes home, make sure to check your entire home for hazards like toxic plants, human foods, small objects that could be swallowed or choked on, sharp edges, etc. Take any steps necessary to remove these hazards and keep your kitten safe.

You’re not alone in your quest to keep your new pet happy and healthy—we’re here to help! Call your Veterinary Clinic Rochester, NY for further advice.

Chocolate Toxicity in Cats

Chocolate and animals don’t mix—your cat is no exception. Although cats aren’t likely to go out of their way to ingest chocolate, it’s still a big risk! Learn more below from a vet in Mt. Pleasant, SC:

Symptoms

The symptoms of chocolate toxicity in cats include drooling, listlessness, lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and—without treatment—collapse, coma, and even death. All types of chocolate (milk, dark, semi-sweet, white, powdered, baking chocolate, etc.) can cause symptoms. That’s because all chocolate contains theobromine and caffeine, the chemicals that cause the reactions.

Treating Poisoning

If you know or suspect that your cat has ingested chocolate, rush them to the nearest veterinary emergency room right away. Your vet may induce vomiting or administer activated charcoal to stop the poison’s absorption in your cat’s system. As Fluffy recovers, supportive measures like oxygen supplementation or fluid therapy might be needed.

Prevention Tips

Of course, preventing chocolate poisoning is far easier than treating it after the fact. All it takes is restricting your cat’s access to any and all chocolate. Store chocolate and foods that contain it inside cabinets, rather than leaving it out on countertops.

Talk to your Animal Hospital Mt. Pleasant, SC professional for more information.

Indoor Cat Exercise Tips

Do you have an indoor cat? It’s important to get them the exercise they need. Use these tips from an Omaha, NE veterinary professional to get your feline friend moving.

Cat Tower

Cat tower structures are great for getting your cat exercise, and cats are able to play on them whenever they’d like—even when you’re not home. These items have multiple levels and often come with built-in toys and scratching posts. Purchase one at your local pet supply store or retail outlet.

Toys

Cat toys provide your feline friend with hours of fun. What she may not realize is that she’s also getting healthy exercise in the process! Make sure your cat has a rotating selection of fun toys to keep her occupied and active.

Walks

Not all cats are keen on walking, but some enjoy it quite a bit. It can provide your indoor cat with a fun excursion into the great outdoors, and it provides good exercise. Talk to your vet for advice on choosing a cat harness and on getting started with walks.

Contact Your Pet Clinic Omaha, NE is here to help with all of your feline friend’s healthcare needs. Make an appointment at the office today!

Indoor Cat Exercise Tips

Do you have an indoor cat? It’s important to get them the exercise they need. Use these tips from an Omaha, NE veterinary professional to get your feline friend moving.

Cat Tower

Cat tower structures are great for getting your cat exercise, and cats are able to play on them whenever they’d like—even when you’re not home. These items have multiple levels and often come with built-in toys and scratching posts. Purchase one at your local pet supply store or retail outlet.

Toys

Cat toys provide your feline friend with hours of fun. What she may not realize is that she’s also getting healthy exercise in the process! Make sure your cat has a rotating selection of fun toys to keep her occupied and active.

Walks

Not all cats are keen on walking, but some enjoy it quite a bit. It can provide your indoor cat with a fun excursion into the great outdoors, and it provides good exercise. Talk to your vet for advice on choosing a cat harness and on getting started with walks.

Contact Your Pet Clinic Omaha, NE is here to help with all of your feline friend’s healthcare needs. Make an appointment at the office today!