Category Archives: Cats care

Essential Supplies for Your New Kitten

If you’re about to bring a new kitten into your home, it’s best to be prepared. That way, you’ll have everything you need to withstand the coming storm! Here are just three of the most essential supplies for a new kitten, as discussed by your Marietta, GA vet.

Litter Box

All cats need a litter box. Make sure to get kitty started early in life so that she gets used to the litter box. Place it in a quiet, low-key area where she can use it without being disturbed, and be sure to clean it on a regular basis.

Food and Water Dishes

Choose sturdy food and water dishes that can’t be easily knocked over by your rambunctious kitten. Stainless steel bowls are usually best, as they tend to be easy to clean and don’t hold bacteria or allergens the way plastic dishes might.

Scratching Post

Your kitten will get out a lot of energy on a sturdy scratching post, and it’s best to get your cat used to proper scratching while she’s young. Browse the selection at your local pet supply store to find a scratching post that’s perfect for Fluffy.

Learn more by calling your veterinarian Marietta, GA.

External Cat Pests

Cats are at risk for external parasites—those that affect the outside of the body—even if they never set foot outdoors since the pests could be carried in on humans or other pets. Learn more here from your London, ON vet.

Ticks

Ticks can transmit dangerous diseases like Lyme diseases, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and Ehrlichiosis, among others. You don’t want your cat to have to deal with these issues! Talk to your vet about getting Fluffy on a tick preventative.

Fleas

Fleas are extremely common, and they’re not fun to eradicate. You might notice tiny black specks underneath your cat’s fur (flea droppings), and you’ll notice Fluffy scratching herself more than usual. Set your cat up on a quality flea preventative to avoid the issue entirely.

Mites and Lice

Mites and lice aren’t quite as common a problem for cats and fleas and ticks, but they can cause harm nonetheless. A mite or lice infestation can, luckily, be treated with shampoos and medications, so talk to your veterinarian if you’ve noticed your cat itching and scratching.

To learn more about external cat pests that can harm your feline friend, call your animal hospital London, ON. We’re here to help!

Why Is Fluffy Ignoring Her Litter Box?

Is your cat ignoring her litter box? Perhaps you’ve found her eliminating on your carpets and floors. Obviously, you’ll want to put a stop to this behavior right away. Here, your Murrieta, CA veterinarian tells you about three possible reasons your cat is shunning her bathroom.

Box Placement

Cats are picky about where their litter box is located. Don’t put it too close to food and water dishes, and make sure it’s placed in a quiet, out-of-the-way spot so your cat can use it without being disturbed.

Cleanliness

Who wants to use a dirty bathroom? Not your cat! Clean Fluffy’s box on a regular basis so that it doesn’t get dirty, because cats have been known to avoid the box altogether if it isn’t cleaned often enough. It cuts down on smells, too!

Medical Issues

There is a possibility that a medical issue, such as an infection or injury, could be preventing your cat from using her litter box properly. If you suspect this is the case, take your cat to the vet’s office right away for an examination.

Do you need help with your cat’s litter box aversion? We’re here for you. Call your animal hospital Murrieta, CA today.

The Basics of Fluffy’s Hairballs

You’ve probably dealt with hairballs before if you own a cat. They certainly don’t seem pleasant for your feline friend, but are they dangerous? Find out more from your Crown Point, IN veterinarian.

Why Do Hairballs Happen, Exactly?

Your cat grooms herself by licking the body with her tongue. Barbs lining the tongue pick up a lot of loose fur from Fluffy’s coat, which she swallows. Most of that hair moves through your cat’s digestive tract and is expelled in the feces, but some remain in the gut and clumps together into a hairball, which is eventually regurgitated.

Are Hairballs Safe for Fluffy?

Occasional hairballs are a normal part of life for your cat and is nothing to worry about. If it happens frequently, it’s time to see the vet––it’s possible that something is causing your pet to shed excessively. Also, vomiting is not same as coughing up a hairball, so let your vet know if your cat is vomiting frequently.

Can I Help My Cat Cough Up Less Hairballs?

Yes––brush your cat regularly to trap loose hair in the brush, and feed her a quality diet to minimize shedding.

Contact your animal hospital Crown Point, IN  for more information.

All About Catnip and Your Cat

Does your feline friend go wild for catnip? It’s our cats’ favorite indulgence, but how much do you know about this fascinating plant? Your veterinarian Washington, DC tells you everything you wanted to know about catnip in this article:

What is Catnip, Exactly?

Catnip is an herb, classified together in the same family of plants as mint and other common herbs. It grows in the wild across North America and various other parts of the world. The “raw” catnip you’ll purchase in a pet store is a dried and processed version of the wild plant, and you can also purchase toys, sprays, and other products that contain catnip.

Why Does Catnip Affect Cats?

Catnip contains a chemical substance called nepetalactone. It triggers a chemical response in your cat’s brain, leading to the reactions you’ll see. Some experts liken it to a kind of sexual response in cats!

Why Isn’t My Cat Reacting?

Is your cat not reacting to catnip at all? No need to worry—your cat is healthy. If a cat doesn’t possess a certain gene, inherited from his or her parents, nepetalactone won’t have any effect in the brain.

Call your vet clinic Washington, DC to learn more.

How to Find Your Lost Cat

It’s a cat owner’s worst nightmare—your sneaky pet has slipped out of a cracked door or open window and disappeared into your yard. How do you go about getting your animal companion back? Here are three tips from an Aurora, CO veterinarian.

In the Night

Often, your cat won’t stray too far from home. If you can’t locate your cat right away, go outside around 2:00 a.m. and crack a can of wet food or a bag of treats. The sound will carry, and your cat is likely to come scampering back.

Hit the Pavement

Head out and post flyers around your neighborhood. Talk to neighbors, the mailman, and other locals to see if anyone has spotted your pet. There’s a good chance your cat is close by, and someone may have seen them recently.

Prevention Tips

Of course, it’s far easier to prevent a lost cat in the first place rather than find one. Do this by making sure windows and doors remain closed—be vigilant when coming or going. Keep your cat properly identified at all times with a microchip, ID tags, or both.

Want to learn more about preventing escape? Call your animal hospital Aurora, CO.

Removing a Tick from Your Cat

Would you be prepared to remove a tick from your cat’s skin if you found one? While your cat’s flea-and-tick preventative should help avoid the problem, ticks can still latch on to our feline friends. Here, your veterinarian Rochester, NY tells you what to do.

Prepare

Get everything you’ll need in one place before you set about removing the tick. You’ll need a pair of tweezers, rubbing alcohol as well as a small jar filled with the rubbing alcohol, a gauze pad, and a pair of latex gloves to protect your hands.

Remove the Tick

Grasp the tick with your tweezers, as close to your cat’s skin as possible, and pull straight out with even pressure. It’s important not to twist or jerk the tick as you’re pulling because this could cause the tick’s pincers to remain in your cat’s skin. Once you’ve completely removed the tick, drop it into your jar and apply more rubbing alcohol to the site.

Next Steps

Wash your tweezers with more alcohol to disinfect them. Keep a close eye on the bite area for the next few weeks. If you see something abnormal, contact your animal hospital Rochester, NY right away for help.

Finding a Lost Cat

No one wants to think about their cat escaping. IF your feline friend manages to slip out, though, what do you do? Here are a few tips from a Frisco, TX vet.

In Your Yard

If you can’t immediately find your cat in your yard, try going out at about 2:00 a.m. with a few cats treats or a can of food. Even if your cat has ventured out of the yard, he or she may hear the sound in the quiet of the night and return to your yard.

Putting Up Flyers

If your cat is gone for longer than a full day, you might want to post flyers around your neighborhood. Include your contact information, and even consider offering a small reward. Enlisting the public’s help is one of the best ways to find your lost cat!

Preventing the Problem

Prevent the problem initially by being extremely cautious when coming and going from your home. Make sure all windows contain sturdy screens. Keep your cat’s identification updated in the form of a microchip, ID tags on the collar, or both.

Does your cat need identification measures? We’re here to help. Contact your vet clinic Frisco, TX right away.

Fluffy’s Aversion to the Litter Box

Has your cat been using the bathroom on your carpets and floors, instead of in her litter box? Litter box aversions aren’t uncommon; almost one in every 10 cats will experience it! Here, your veterinarian Las Vegas, NV tells you about three possible causes.

Placement

Your cat tends to be quite picky about where her litter box is located. Place it too close to food and water, or in a crowded area of the house, and she might not use it at all! It’s best to put the box in a quiet, calm area where your cat won’t be disturbed while using her bathroom.

Cleanliness

Clean your cat’s bathroom out regularly. Cats have been known to stop using their bathroom entirely if it’s not clean! Scoop out your cat’s waste on a daily basis, adding a bit of fresh litter to make up the difference, and change the litter entirely about once a week.

Medical Concerns

Medical problems like disease, injury, or stress could be the root cause of your cat’s aversion to the litter box. If you think your cat could be suffering, make an appointment at the vet’s office.

Contact your veterinarian Las Vegas, NV to learn more.

Milk and Your Cat

Did you know that milk and cats—however great of a mix they may seem—don’t actually go together very well? Too much milk will almost certainly make your cat sick! Learn more here from a Tampa, FL veterinarian.

Why Can’t My Cat Drink Milk?

Most adult cats are actually lactose-intolerant. This means that they don’t have enough lactase in the gut to digest lactose, the main enzyme of milk. Drinking too much milk, or other dairy, will probably result in vomiting or diarrhea!

What About Kittens?

Kittens do need their mother’s milk, or a synthetic substitute if the mother’s milk isn’t available, for proper growth in the early stages of life. As they age, though, a kitten starts to produce less lactase. By the time they’re fully grown, a cat will most likely be lactose-intolerant and doesn’t need any milk at all.

What Can I Give My Cat?

Your cat needs one liquid to stay healthy: fresh water. If you want to give your cat milk, try a specially formulated “cat milk,” which has had the lactose removed to make it safe for your feline friend.

To learn more about your cat’s dietary needs, call your vet Tampa, FL.