Category Archives: Cats care

Obesity in Cats

Many of our feline friends are overweight; nearly half, in fact. It’s a serious problem that is about much more than a few extra pounds! Here, your veterinarian Rochester, NY tells you more.

Dangers of Obesity

Your cat’s excess weight can start to put more pressure on joints, making arthritis more likely. Obesity can also begin to affect digestive and respiratory organs, and ultimately shorten a cat’s lifespan!

Treating Obesity

Treating an obese cat will involve a tailored weight-loss plan. See your veterinarian if you think your cat is overweight; you’ll probably need to adjust Fluffy’s portion size, and you may need to upgrade her to a premium diet or a diet made specifically for weight-loss. Exercise is the other half of the equation—get your cat moving on a daily basis with playtime!

Preventing Obesity

Prevent obesity in the first place by feeding your cat in proper serving sizes and exercising her regularly. Ask your vet for a recommendation on a great diet choice, and ask about a measured portion size. Additionally, don’t overdo treats or fatty table scraps.

Need help getting your cat to lose weight? We are here for you! Call your animal hospital Rochester, NY today.

Fluffy’s Hairballs

Have you ever seen your cat cough up a hairball? It’s not very pleasant looking, and it’s definitely no fun to clean up. Below, your veterinarians Marietta, GA tells you everything you need to know about your cat’s hairball production.

What Causes Hairballs?

When your cat grooms herself, barbs lining the tongue pick up loose hair from the coat. Your cat swallows this hair, and most of it moves through the digestive tract and gets expelled in the feces. Some hair remains in the gut, though, and clumps together in a hairball—that eventually gets coughed up, along with some stomach fluid.

Are Hairballs Dangerous?

No, the occasional hairball is perfectly normal for a healthy cat. However, if your cat is coughing up hairballs frequently, or if they’re gagging and retching without actually producing a hairball, you’ll want to have them see the vet right away.

Can I Help My Cat Cough Up Fewer Hairballs?

Yes, there are a few steps you can take to minimize hairball production. First, feed Fluffy a great diet to keep the coat healthy and minimize shedding. Secondly, brush your cat daily to remove loose hair.

To learn more, call your animal hospital Marietta, GA.

Age-Appropriate Diet Choices for Cats

A cat’s nutritional needs, much like your own, change over time. It’s important to realize that a kitten’s dietary requirements are much different than a senior cat’s! Your Tampa, FL veterinarian gives a breakdown of age-appropriate diet choices in this article:

Kittens

Newborn kittens will require the mother’s milk—or a synthetic substitute milk if the mother’s milk isn’t available—for proper growth early on in life. Young kittens can be fed a wet kitten food until transitioning to dry food after a few months. Work closely with your vet to get your kitten’s food choice correct.

Adult Cats

An adult cat should be fed a nutritionally balanced, high-quality cat food that provides all of the right vitamins, minerals, proteins, and other nutrients for a healthy life. Don’t give your adult cat a “budget” food that contains a lot of filler material—that’s only packing on extra calories that your cat doesn’t need.

Senior Felines

Senior cats have special nutritional requirements to remain healthy in the last years of life. Ask your vet to recommend a great senior diet choice for your aging feline friend.

To learn more about your cat’s dietary and nutritional needs, contact your vet Tampa, FL.

Do Hairballs Hurt My Cat?

Have you ever seen your cat cough up a hairball? It’s a part of life for most cats, but is it harmful in any way? Your vet clinic Washington DC is here to answer your questions.

Why Do Hairballs Occur?

Your cat grooms herself on a regular basis, and her tongue picks up loose hair from the coat. Your cat swallows this hair, and most of it moves through the digestive tract and gets expelled in the feces. Some remains in the gut, though, and clumps together into a hairball. That hairball is eventually regurgitated.

Are Hairballs Harmful?

The occasional hairball is perfectly normal and won’t harm your cat. However, if your cat’s hairball production has increased dramatically, it could be a sign of health trouble. If you see your cat retching and gagging, but not actually producing a hairball, see your vet promptly; your cat might be choking.

Can I Help My Cat Have Fewer Hairballs?

Feed your cat a high-quality diet to keep the skin and fur healthy, minimizing shedding at the outset. Brush Fluffy daily to trap loose fur and prevent it from falling all over your home.

Call your animal hospital Washington DC today for more information.

Why Your Cat Has Given Up on Her Litterbox

Did you know that about one in every 10 cats will have some sort of aversion to their litterbox at one point or another? If your cat has seemingly given up on her bathroom, it’s time to act. Here, your veterinarian London, ON describes three common reasons for this and what you can do about it.

Cleanliness

No one likes a dirty bathroom, your cat included. A dirty box is one of the leading reasons for litterbox avoidance! Scoop out Fluffy’s waste on a daily basis, and change the litter entirely about once a week. This will keep things fresh and clean, meaning your cat is more likely to use her bathroom properly.

Placement

Like you, your cat doesn’t enjoy being disturbed while using the bathroom. Place Fluffy’s box in a quiet, out-of-the-way part of the house where she can do her business in peace. If your cat is startled frequently while using her bathroom, she may decide to shun it entirely.

Medical Concerns

Medical concerns—urinary tract infections, injury, and much more—can cause a cat to avoid their litterbox and eliminate outside of it. Contact your vet clinic London, ON right away if you think your cat is ill!

How to Lengthen Your Cat’s Lifespan

Your cat offers you and your family years of unbridled joy, companionship, and love. Why not extend that for as long as possible? Below, your veterinarian Rochester, NY tells you about three ways to lengthen Fluffy’s lifespan.

See the Vet

Have your cat examined at the vet’s office on a regular basis. This way, your veterinarian can ensure that your cat continues to remain healthy as the years go by, and any health concerns can be caught and treated early on. It’s recommended that your cat be seen by the vet at least twice a year.

Practice Preventative Care

Preventative care is essential for a long, healthy life. That means keeping your cat up-to-date on essential vaccinations, and having them wear a proper flea preventative. Talk to your veterinarian today if your cat is in need of these preventative measures. Your pet will thank you!

Feed a Great Diet

One of the best—and easiest—ways to lengthen your cat’s life is to feed them a great diet. When your cat gets all the proper nutrients through her food, all body systems stay healthy!

Want a recommendation on a proper diet for your cat? Contact your vet in Rochester, NY.

Senior Cat Care 101

Is your cat getting along in years? Our senior feline companions need love and attention now more than ever. Here are a few tips from a vet Roanoke, VA to keep your aging cat in good shape for years to come.

Proper Diet

Your older cat’s nutritional needs are quite different from what they were in her younger years. It’s important to feed your cat a specially formulated senior diet to provide the proper nutrition. Ask your vet for a recommendation, and ask about the proper portion size for your companion’s needs.

Grooming Help

Although cats are quite good in the grooming department, they can use a little assistance by the time they’re seniors. That’s especially true of older pets who are beginning to suffer from the painful twinges of arthritis; they may not be able to twist and turn the way they once did to reach certain areas. Brush your cat daily to keep the coat and skin healthy.

Veterinary Check-ups

All cats need their veterinary check-ups, but your senior feline has a special need for regular examinations. This way, any health concerns can be caught and treated early on.

Call your vet clinic Roanoke, VA for more great tips!

Your Cat’s Hairballs

Hairballs are a part of life for most cat owners. Have you ever wondered if they’re safe for your feline companion? Below, your Livonia, MI vet covers the basics of Fluffy’s hairballs.

Why Do Hairballs Occur?

Cats ingest loose hair while grooming themselves; tiny barbs on the tongue pick it up, and your cat swallows it. Most of this swallowed hair passes through the digestive tract and gets expelled naturally in the feces, but some remains in the gut. This hair eventually clumps into a hairball, which is regurgitated by your cat.

Do Hairballs Cause Any Harm?

No, the occasional hairball shouldn’t cause your cat any harm. However, if your cat is gagging and retching but not producing a hairball, she could have a blocked airway—rush your pet to the emergency room. Additionally, vomiting is not the same as producing a hairball. If your cat is vomiting consistently, it’s time to see the vet.

Can I Lessen the Frequency of Hairballs?

Feed your cat a healthy diet; it will aid in digestive function and move hair through the gut properly. Brush your cat yourself to remove loose fur from her coat.

Call your veterinarian Livonia, MI to learn more!

Cats and Milk Don’t Mix!

Cats and milk might seem like a match made in heaven. Did you know that this pairing is not as idyllic as it may seem? Learn more below from your vet in Fort Collins, CO.

Why Can’t Cats Drink Milk?

Most adult cats are lactose-intolerant, just like many humans can be. This means that the cat can’t properly digest lactose, the main enzyme found in milk. Too much milk, and your cat will likely experience an upset stomach, vomiting, or diarrhea!

Don’t Kittens Need Milk?

Yes, newborn kittens will require their mother’s milk—or a substitute milk product—for the proper growth in the early stages of life. As a cat ages, though, they begin to produce less and less lactase in the gut, meaning that they gradually become more and more lactose-intolerant.

Is Any Dairy Safe for Cats?

Other types of dairy like yogurt or cheese contain less lactose than milk, so your cat might respond better to those foods. However, no dairy is nutritionally necessary for cats! If you must give Fluffy dairy foods as a treat, keep the portions extremely small to be safe.

For more information on your cat’s diet, call your vet Fort Collins, CO.

Hairballs 101

If you own a cat, hairballs are probably a part of life. Have you ever wondered why your cat expels hairballs, and if they’re safe? Learn more below from a vet in Rochester, NY.

How Do Hairballs Form?

Cats ingest hair when they groom themselves. Most of that hair moves through the digestive tract and gets expelled in the feces, but some of it remains in the gut. That hair will eventually be regurgitated in the form of a hairball.

Are Hairballs Dangerous?

The occasional hairball is perfectly natural and shouldn’t cause your cat any harm. However, if your cat is expelling hairballs frequently, it’s worth a trip to the vet’s office. Also, if your cat is retching and gagging but not producing a hairball, it may be stuck in the trachea—rush your pet to the emergency room.

Can I Limit My Cat’s Hairballs?

Ask your veterinarian about simple diet changes or dietary supplements that can help your cat’s hair move through the digestive tract more smoothly. However, grooming your cat yourself is the best way to reduce hairballs—by trapping hair in the brush, your cat ingests less!

more information on hairballs, call your pet clinic Rochester, NY.