All posts by rsuser

Pet Toxins At Home

Believe it or not, there are plenty of potential pet toxins in your home right now. The trick is knowing what to watch out for so that your pet can stay safe! Learn more below as your veterinarian Ashburn, VA elaborates.

Human Foods

All sorts of human foods—grapes and raisins, onions, garlic, chives, leeks, scallions, shallots, chocolate, caffeine, alcohol, candy, gum, certain nuts, avocado, fatty foods, salty items, and much more—aren’t good for pets to ingest. Keep harmful foods out of the reach of your cat or dog!

Medicine

Human medicines like cough syrup, aspirin, antidepressants, and over-the-counter medications can poison a pet who ingests too much. Never allow your pet access to the medicine cabinet; keep all medications locked away where pets can’t reach.

Pesticides

Do you use pesticides, fertilizers, or similar substances in and around your home? Products like these can prove very dangerous to pets. It’s important to keep your pet elsewhere if you’re using strong chemicals; place pesticides around your home with extreme caution and in areas that pets won’t go.

Would you like more information on keeping your pet safe at home? We’re here to help. Call your animal hospital Ashburn, VA today.

Tricking Your Dog Into Taking His Pill

It’s not always easy to get your dog to swallow a pill. Our canine friends are notoriously picky when it comes to swallowing medication! Below, your veterinarian Ellicott City, MD offers a few tricks to get your dog to take his pill with minimal fuss.

Hide in Food

It’s often easiest to hide your dog’s pill in food. Press it into the center of a soft dog treat, or wrap it into a roll of deli meat. Some dogs will even take a pill that’s inserted into a glob of wet dog food. With luck, your dog will swallow the morsel without even knowing there was medication in it!

Crush or Grind

Ask your vet about crushing or grinding up your dog’s pill, allowing you to sprinkle it over meals or stir it into your dog’s food. It’s not always a safe method—it might render medicine ineffective, or introduce too much at once to your dog’s system—but it can work in some cases.

The Tossing Trick

Toss a dog treat or two to your pet, then the pill, then a treat. You may be able to trick Fido entirely!

For help, contact your veterinary clinic Ellicott City, MD.

Purchasing a Dog Carrier

It’s a safe bet that at one point or another in your dog’s life, you’ll have to transport them somewhere—whether it’s to the vet’s office or on vacation, it’s an important step! Use these tips from a veterinary clinic Glendale, AZ to pick the right carrier for your dog’s needs.

Size

Of course, size is one of the first considerations you’ll need to make when it comes to choosing your dog’s carrier. Remember: if your dog is young now, he may grow much larger over time. Choose your pet’s carrier accordingly; for some owners, it may be necessary to purchase another crate later in life.

Security

Inspect the latch mechanism on the crate to make sure it’s sturdy. Crafty dogs may be able to reach a paw through the opening gate and undo the latch, potentially escaping! You’ll want to choose a carrier that is completely secure and keeps your dog safe and sound.

Ventilation

It can get quite stuffy in a carrier if there isn’t proper ventilation. Choose a carrier with ventilation slits that are large enough to provide good airflow without allowing your dog to stick paws through.

For help, talk to your vets Glendale AZ.

Enriching Your Dog’s Indoor Life

Although most dogs enjoy—and need—regular outdoor time, there is plenty of time that you’ll be spending indoors with your canine companion. The question is, how do you keep your pooch properly stimulated and enriched? Here are some tips from a veterinary clinic Aurora, CO.

Toys

There’s no substitute for good dog toys. They allow your dog to entertain themselves and get good exercise, and they provide great mental stimulation at the same time. Make a point to play with your dog and a favorite toy on a daily basis—your pet will thank you!

Training

Training your dog indoors is a good way to keep his mind active and benefit you and your family at the same time. All dogs should know the basic commands—sit, stay, come, heel, and lay down—and you can also experiment with other commands or tricks, like roll over or paw. Consult your vet for information on the best way to get started with dog training.

Games

Get creative and try playing games like hide-and-seek or tug-of-war with your dog. Fun for the whole family!

Does your dog need a veterinary examination? We’re here to help! Call your animal hospital Aurora, CO.

Toxins for Pets Already in Your Home

Even the most safety-conscious pet owner can’t help but have a few pet toxins in their home. The trick is knowing what to watch out for so that your pet stays safe! Learn more below from a vet in Thorold, ON.

Cleaning Supplies

Many household cleaning supplies—common disinfectants, bleach products like toilet-bowl cleaner, air fresheners, carpet cleaner, and much more—can poison a pet who manages to ingest them. Don’t leave your supply closet open, and move pets elsewhere when using chemical products.

Toxic Foods

All kinds of human foods aren’t safe for pets. The list includes garlic, onions, chives, leeks, scallions, shallots, grapes and raisins, avocado, caffeinated foods and beverages, chocolate, candy, certain nuts, fatty foods, and much more. Don’t let your pet chow down on table scraps, and keep them out of the kitchen during mealtimes.

Human Medications

Did you know that medicines like aspirin and cough syrup, found in nearly every home, can harm a pet who swallows too much? Antidepressants, over-the-counter drugs, and prescription pills can also cause serious harm. Don’t let your pet explore the medicine cabinet!

For more information on pet toxins at home, call your veterinarians Thorold, ON. We’re here for you!

Vaccinations for Your Dog Or Cat

A key part of your pet’s healthy lifestyle is vaccinations. They’re simply essential for warding off dangerous diseases and keeping your pet healthy for years on end! Here, your Livonia, MI veterinarian tells you about the basics of your dog or cat’s vaccinations.

Core Vaccines

All pets need what are called the core vaccines. That’s because they protect against particularly common and/or dangerous diseases—some examples include the vaccines that protect against distemper, parvovirus, rabies, feline hepatitis, influenza, feline leukemia, and others. Ask your vet about the core vaccines that your pet needs.

Non-Core Vaccines

Non-core vaccines aren’t considered essential for every pet. However, they might benefit some pets based on factors like risk of exposure, geographical location, etc. The Lyme disease vaccination and the Bordetella vaccine are just two examples; your vet can tell you about other vaccines that your pet might need depending on their health and the area in which you live.

Booster Shots

Booster shots are required for most vaccines—usually on a yearly basis, but occasionally in multi-year increments—to remain effective. Most pet owners have these administered at one of their pet’s regular check-ups.

For more information, call your veterinary hospital Livonia, MI today.

Considering Insurance for Your Pet

You can buy insurance for your pet just like you purchase it for your home, car, and health—it’s a great way to ensure your pet’s continued health if something unexpected happens. Here, your Marietta, GA vet goes over the basics of pet insurance.

How Pet Insurance Works

Pet insurance works like other insurance: you’ll pay a premium (monthly or perhaps yearly) and have a set deductible. If something happens to your pet, you’ll be able to use your insurance at designated providers to get your animal friend the healthcare they need.

What Pet Insurance Covers

Different types of pet insurance cover different things. There is catastrophic pet insurance, which covers major accidents and illnesses, as well as more routine plans that may help with medication costs or office visits. Talk to your vet to find out what type of pet insurance might work best for you and your pet.

Insuring Multiple Pets

Most pet insurance providers offer plans to cover more than one pet at once. This can be a great way to save money if you own more than one animal companion!

For more information on pet insurance, call your veterinary clinic Marietta, GA. We’re here for you!

Three Benefits of Spaying and Neutering

Has your cat or dog been spayed or neutered? It’s one of the most important steps you can take to ensure your animal friend’s well-being. Here, your Sugar Land, TX veterinarian tells you about three specific benefits:

Health Benefits

The risk of genital cancers is virtually eliminated in both male and female pets, and other cancer types are also far less likely to occur in pets who have had the procedure performed. Urinary tract infections and other common health issues are also less likely! Save yourself the worry and cost of treating and managing these issues later on in life.

Behavior Improvement

Pets who have been spayed or neutered generally behave far better than those who haven’t. While the procedure doesn’t fix all behavior issues in one fell swoop, it’s a great way to lessen the likelihood of problems like house soiling, aggression, escape attempts, digging, scratching, chewing, and more.

The Broad Benefit

There is a broader benefit to spaying and neutering—it helps control the homeless pet population by lessening the amount of pets who can breed unrestricted. Don’t contribute to the problem by leaving your pet intact!

To make an appointment, call your vets Sugar Land, TX.

Hazard Spots for Pets at Home

Did you know that just about any typical home has a few danger zones for pets? Fortunately, it just takes some simple precautions to keep your animal friend safe. Learn more here from a vet in Marietta, GA:

The Kitchen

Kitchens are home to a variety of sharp objects, as well as hot surfaces like stovetops, coffeepots, toasters, and ovens. They also house a host of foods that are harmful to pets—the list includes onions, garlic, chives, leeks, shallots, scallions, grapes and raisins, chocolate, candy, gum, avocado, salt, fatty foods, and much more. It’s best to keep pets out of the kitchen when cooking.

Supply Closets

All sorts of everyday cleaning products—bleach-based products, air fresheners, furniture polish, disinfectants, glass cleaner—can harm a pet who manages to swallow them. Move pets elsewhere if you’re using strong cleaners, and keep the supply closet shut tight at all times.

Medicine Cabinets

A variety of human medications, including aspirin, cough syrup, antidepressants, and over-the-counter and prescription pills, can poison pets! Keep medications stored properly where pets can’t reach, and stash your pet’s own medications in a separate area.

Want more advice on pet safety? Contact your veterinary clinic Marietta, GA today.

Your Cat, Milk, and Other Dairy

Cats and milk seem like a natural match. You’re probably already picturing a cat lapping up milk from a saucer! Did you know that cats and milk don’t actually mix? Your Rochester, NY vet tells you more below.

Why Isn’t Milk Good for Cats?

Most adult cats are lactose-intolerant, just like many humans are. This means that they can’t properly digest lactose, the main enzyme found in milk. Although a small amount of milk isn’t likely to do any harm, don’t overdo it—your cat will experience an upset stomach, diarrhea, or vomiting!

Don’t Kittens Need Milk?

Kittens do require their mother’s milk (or a synthetic substitute) during the nursing stage. As they get older, though, they gradually become more and more lactose-intolerant.

What About Other Dairy Products?

Milk has the most lactose out of dairy products, so other dairy foods like cheese or yogurt can be a bit safer to feed to your cat. However, they’re not nutritionally necessary, and your cat may not even bother tasting them anyway! It’s always safest to stick to your feline friend’s normal diet.

Would you like more advice on your cat’s nutritional needs? Call your veterinarian Rochester NY today for help.