All posts by rsuser

Pica in Cats

Pica is a term that describes a condition in which cats eat a non-food material. That material could be fabric, wood, paper, socks, batteries, or almost anything else! Learn more about this dangerous problem in this article from a Rochester, NY vet.

Causes of Pica

There are many possible causes for pica, and a definitive cause isn’t always identified. Some possibilities include stress, dietary deficiencies, simple boredom, or an underlying medical cause.

Dangers of Pica

Obviously, your cat eating things she shouldn’t isn’t good for her. Ingesting foreign objects can result in choking, or an object can obstruct your cat’s digestive tract. Severe cases might require emergency surgery to remove a foreign object that is stuck in your cat’s digestive tract or intestines.

Treating Pica

If your cat seems to be nibbling on or eating non-food items, call your vet’s office to make an appointment. Your veterinarian will diagnose the problem and figure out the best way to move forward. Treatment may involve treating an underlying medical issue if there is one present or behavior modification and stress removal may be necessary.

Talk to your veterinarian Rochester, NY to learn more about pica in cats. We’re always here to help!

Can Dogs Get Poison Ivy?

We all know that poison ivy is irritating to humans. But can poison ivy affect our canine friends? It turns out that yes, dogs can suffer from toxic ivy, although it isn’t particularly common. Learn more here from an Aurora, CO veterinarian.

Symptoms of Poison Ivy

The major symptom of toxic ivy in dogs is similar to the main symptom in humans: an itchy red rash. The rash is often accompanied by blistering and swelling. Dogs can also be affected by poison oak and poison sumac, both causing similar symptoms. The rash is most likely to appear on areas that aren’t completely covered by fur.

Treating Poison Ivy

If your dog is suffering from toxic ivy, you’ll need to bathe them with warm water and dish soap, oatmeal shampoo, or a dog shampoo designed to reduce inflammation. Wear latex gloves so that the irritating agent doesn’t come into contact with your own skin. Tell your vet if the problem continues.

Preventing Poison Ivy

Keep an eye out for the “leaves of three” that toxic plants are known for. That gives you and your dog the best chance for avoiding poison ivy!

Talk to your veterinary clinic Aurora, CO for more information.

3 Tips for Boarding Your Dog

It’s a safe bet that you’ll have to board your dog at one point or another. How do you go about finding the right facility to make sure your fido is comfortable? Here are three quick tips from a vet in Glendale, AZ to board your dog successfully:

Choose the Right Facility

Always choose a boarding kennel that you’re comfortable with. Make sure it’s clean and well-staffed; take a look around before your pup’s stay to observe general cleanliness, procedures, and safety. Ask if your fido can take a tour before their stay begins.

Keep it Familiar

Make sure to bring along your dog’s bed, toys, and dishes from home. Having some items from his normal space will go a long way toward helping your fido to have a familiar sense around him while you’re gone.

Keep Goodbyes Short

Don’t go overboard with goodbyes when dropping your dog off at the kennel, tempting as it may be. By making a big deal out of leaving your dog there, your dog is only getting more excited and maybe more poorly behaved while you’re gone.

Is your dog healthy enough for boarding? Call your vet Glendale, AZ to make absolutely sure.

What You Need to Know About Your Cat’s Hairballs

Have you ever witnessed your cat coughing up a hairball? It’s certainly not pleasant, but is it harmful for your cat in any way? Why does it happen at all? Below, your Burlington, ON vet provides you with answers on your cat’s hairballs. 

Why Do Hairballs Form? 

Your cat grooms herself frequently and swallows a lot of the loose hair on her coat while doing so. Most of that hair moves through the digestive tract and gets expelled naturally in the feces, but some of it stays in the gut. That hair clumps into a hairball, which is eventually regurgitated. 

Are Hairballs Harmful?

No, hairballs are natural and don’t harm your cat in the least. However, if your cat has suddenly started coughing up hairballs frequently, or if she’s gagging and retching without producing anything, call your vet. Your cat could have a medical issue causing her to shed more, or she could be choking! 

How Can I Minimize Hairball Production?

Feed your cat a high-quality diet to keep the coat in good shape and minimize shedding. Brush Fluffy regularly to trap fur in the brush itself, preventing her from swallowing it. 

Contact your veterinarian Burlington, ON for more information.

Preventative Essentials for Pets

Why bother dealing with a problem at all if you can prevent it in the first place? When it comes to your dog or cat’s health, you can do just that! Here, your Burlington, ON veterinarian gives you tips on your pet’s preventative essentials.

Pest Control

Fleas, ticks, and parasitic worms pose a real threat to your four-legged friend. Your best bet is to keep these parasites at bay ahead of time by using preventative medications. Talk to your veterinarian about a flea-and-tick control medication, as well as a heartworm preventative, to keep your animal friend protected all year round.

Vaccines

Vaccinations against dangerous diseases like hepatitis, parvovirus, distemper, and rabies are essential for almost every pet. These diseases are far more difficult to eradicate after the fact than they are to avoid in the first place! Your veterinarian can tell you what vaccines your pet needs, so call the office today.

Veterinary Checkups

When your veterinarian examines your pet regularly, any health concerns are caught early and can be treated as necessary. That makes for a happier, healthier pet in the long-term!

Ready to make your pet’s next appointment? Call your veterinary clinic Burlington, ON. We’re here to help!

Understanding Your Cat’s Favorite Plant

Does your feline friend enjoy catnip? For most of our cats, it’s their absolute favorite indulgence. Below, your London, ON veterinary professional tells you more about your cat and catnip.

What is Catnip?

Catnip is actually an herb, classified together in the same family of plants as common herbs like mint and basil. In fact, you can purchase catnip at many greenhouses. In a pet store, you’ll find a processed and dried version of the wild plant—that’s raw catnip, and catnip can also be infused into sprays or included in cat toys.

Is Catnip Harmful?

No, catnip is not harmful for your feline friend. It causes a chemical reaction in your cat’s brain that only lasts a few minutes, and it doesn’t harm your cat in the least. Your pet can’t become addicted to catnip or overdose on the herb, so give it to her as often as you’d like.

Why Doesn’t My Cat React?

Does your cat not do much when given catnip? If she doesn’t possess a particular gene, inherited from her parents, catnip won’t have any effect! Don’t fret—your cat is perfectly healthy.

Learn more about catnip by contacting your veterinarian London, ON today.

Can My Dog Be Allergic to My Cat?

Dogs can be allergic to a number of things: pollen, dust, dirt, mold… the list goes on and on. If you own a cat, you may be surprised to learn that your dog can also be allergic to your feline friend! Learn more here from a Frisco, TX vet.

Allergy Symptoms

It’s not incredibly common for a dog to be allergic to cats, but it’s possible. Symptoms will be similar to other environmental allergies like pollen or dust allergies, and they include things like scratching, licking, redness and inflammation on the skin, hair loss, and pustules or crusts on the skin.

Dealing With the Problem

If you think your dog is suffering from an allergy, take him to the vet’s office. Through certain tests and a health history, your vet will confirm whether or not the allergy is caused by your cat. From there, solutions like allergy vaccinations and allergy medication can be prescribed.

Solutions At Home

You might be able to use certain shampoos to help your dog feel better. There are also dietary changes that might help your dog to experience fewer symptoms. Ask your vet for more details.

Call your vet Frisco, TX to make an appointment.

Essential Supplies for Your New Kitten

If you’re about to bring a new kitten into your home, it’s best to be prepared. That way, you’ll have everything you need to withstand the coming storm! Here are just three of the most essential supplies for a new kitten, as discussed by your Marietta, GA vet.

Litter Box

All cats need a litter box. Make sure to get kitty started early in life so that she gets used to the litter box. Place it in a quiet, low-key area where she can use it without being disturbed, and be sure to clean it on a regular basis.

Food and Water Dishes

Choose sturdy food and water dishes that can’t be easily knocked over by your rambunctious kitten. Stainless steel bowls are usually best, as they tend to be easy to clean and don’t hold bacteria or allergens the way plastic dishes might.

Scratching Post

Your kitten will get out a lot of energy on a sturdy scratching post, and it’s best to get your cat used to proper scratching while she’s young. Browse the selection at your local pet supply store to find a scratching post that’s perfect for Fluffy.

Learn more by calling your veterinarian Marietta, GA.

Why is My Dog Eating Grass?

Have you ever seen your dog eating grass? It’s a relatively common thing for our canine friends to do. But is it safe? Your Fort Collins, CO veterinarian fills you in below.

Why Do Dogs Eat Grass?

No one knows exactly why dogs eating grass, but there are several theories. One is that dogs may eat grass to induce vomiting, maybe to alleviate a gassy or upset stomach. A dog might also eat grass to add a little texture or roughage to their diet, or because they’re simply tired of their normal kibble.

Could There Be a Medical Problem?

Yes, it’s possible that a dog eating grass is doing so because of a medical issue. Your pup may be experiencing a nutritional deficiency and be eating grass in an attempt to seek out missing nutrients. Let your vet know if Fido is eating grass frequently.

Is Eating Grass Safe?

At the end of the day, it’s probably best to not let your dog eat grass. Even if there’s no medical issue at play, grass could have been treated with fertilizers or other chemicals, and you don’t want Fido ingesting them!

Call your vet clinic Fort Collins, CO to learn more.

External Cat Pests

Cats are at risk for external parasites—those that affect the outside of the body—even if they never set foot outdoors since the pests could be carried in on humans or other pets. Learn more here from your London, ON vet.

Ticks

Ticks can transmit dangerous diseases like Lyme diseases, Rocky Mountain spotted fever, and Ehrlichiosis, among others. You don’t want your cat to have to deal with these issues! Talk to your vet about getting Fluffy on a tick preventative.

Fleas

Fleas are extremely common, and they’re not fun to eradicate. You might notice tiny black specks underneath your cat’s fur (flea droppings), and you’ll notice Fluffy scratching herself more than usual. Set your cat up on a quality flea preventative to avoid the issue entirely.

Mites and Lice

Mites and lice aren’t quite as common a problem for cats and fleas and ticks, but they can cause harm nonetheless. A mite or lice infestation can, luckily, be treated with shampoos and medications, so talk to your veterinarian if you’ve noticed your cat itching and scratching.

To learn more about external cat pests that can harm your feline friend, call your animal hospital London, ON. We’re here to help!