All posts by rsuser

What Your Cat’s Tail is Telling You

One of the main ways that cats communicate, aside from vocalizations, is with their tail. Wondering what your cat is saying with her tail movements? Your Greenville, SC vet gives you a crash course below.

The Flagpole

When a cat holds their tail straight up in the air very rigidly, they’re usually feeling confident and poised. Most cats will happily accept a petting session when their tail is in this position; oblige your feline friend with some loving!

The Question Mark

You may sometimes see your cat’s tail bent in a gentle curve, almost like a question mark. Cats often position their tails this way when they’re feeling playful; you may soon see your cat dart around the house or play with her toys.

The Wrap

Have you ever noticed your cat wrap her tail around your leg gently while passing? Some cats even wrap their tails around other cats. This is a sign of love and affection, similar to the way we would put a loving arm on a friend’s shoulder. Feel free to love your cat right back!

Remember: not all cats are the same. Call your Greenville, SC vet to find out more about feline body language.

Safety Tips for Walking Your Dog

Walking your dog shouldn’t be a difficult task. With that being said, it’s important to take note of a few safety considerations before leaving home! Below, your Thousand Oaks, CA veterinarian tells you more.

Use a Leash

Always use a leash during walks, even if your dog is well-trained. Even the most obedient dogs can be startled by loud noises or dart off after a pesky squirrel. Keeping your dog on-leash is the best way to make sure he stays safe at all times.

Teach Recall Commands

Of course, there is the possibility that your dog can tear the leash out of your hands, or slip out of the collar. Perhaps you use a retractable leash, and your dog gets far ahead of you before you have the chance to stop it. In these cases, it’s always good to have your dog know a recall command, like “back!” or “come!” Ask your veterinarian how to get started with training.

Nighttime Tips

Both you and your dog should don reflective clothing when walking at nighttime. This will illuminate you to passing motorists and other walkers, minimizing any risk.

Does your dog need a veterinary exam? Contact your vet clinic Thousand Oaks, CA.

Keep Your Pet Away from These In-Home Toxins

Did you know that just about every home already contains some—if not all—of the following pet poisons? Don’t worry, though; all it takes to keep your pet safe is a few simple precautions. Your Orangevale, CA veterinarian elaborates below.

Human Medication

Many human medicines, from aspirin and antidepressants to prescription pills and cough syrup, aren’t good for pets. Never leave any of your medications out on countertops or tables where pets may be able to swipe them down. Remember: child-proof plastic caps are no match for a pet with strong jaws!

Poisonous Plant Life

There is a long list of potentially poisonous plants and flowers that may be found in your home. They include lilies, tulips, daffodils, ivy, oleander, elephant ear, certain aloe plant varieties, the sago palm, poinsettias, and more. Ask your vet what sorts of toxic plants are common in your area, and remove them from your home or garden immediately.

Toxic Foods

Plenty of human foods—chocolate, candy, grapes and raisins, onions, garlic, avocado, alcohol, and many more—are very bad for pets. Never let your animal companion gain access; store harmful foods safely in the refrigerator.

Call your animal hospital Orangevale, CA for more information.

Three Reasons to Get Your Pet a Microchip

Have you ever heard of microchips for pets? They’re the best way to keep your four-legged friend identified, and they’re becoming more popular every day. Learn about just three of microchips’ many benefits below from a Warminster, PA vet.

Secure Identification

Some pets may be able to chew through, slip off, or rip away a collar containing ID tags. With a microchip, you don’t have this worry; the chip is implanted under your pet’s skin and cannot be removed unless a veterinary professional does so.

Easy to Have Updated

If you move or change your telephone number, you’ll have to get new ID tags. If your pet has a microchip, you don’t even have to leave home to update it! Simply contact the microchip manufacturer, and they’ll update your pet’s information in their database instantly.

Quick, Painless, and Inexpensive

The microchipping procedure only takes a few moments, and your pet won’t feel any pain—the chip itself is inserted with a specialized syringe, and the whole process is very much like a vaccination. In addition, microchips aren’t expensive, usually ranging between $25 and $75.

Does your pet need properly identified? Set up an appointment at your Warminster, PA animal hospital.

How to Keep Your Dog’s Teeth Healthy

Did you know that dental problems are some of the most common health issues veterinarians treat in our domesticated dogs? Don’t let your dog fall victim—learn how to keep your dog’s teeth in great shape from your Moorpark, CA vet.

Quality Diet

Great oral health—not to mention overall well-being—starts with a high-quality, nutritionally balanced diet. Make sure your dog is being fed a diet that is appropriate for his or her age, weight, breed, and body condition. Ask your vet to recommend a food that fits the bill.

Brushing Sessions

That’s right, you can brush your dog’s teeth at home. All you’ll need is a specially formulated canine toothpaste and a pet toothbrush, available at your local pet supply store. Ask your veterinarian to help you get started with regular brushing sessions.

Veterinary Visits

Of course, keeping regular appointments with your vet clinic Moorpark, CA is another great way to make sure your dog’s dental health stays in check. When your vet sees your dog regularly, he or she can catch any problems early and treat them before they’re allowed to progress. Your vet can also recommend other ways to keep your pooch’s mouth healthy in the future.

Three Pet Poisons That May Already Be in Your Home

That’s right, the following pet toxins may already reside in your home. Don’t worry, though—all it takes is a few precautionary measures to keep your four-legged companion safe from harm. Your Olathe, KS veterinarian elaborates below.

Toxic Plants and Flowers

The list of potentially hazardous plants and flowers is quite long. It includes lilies, dieffenbachia, elephant ear, certain aloe plants, the sago palm, oleander, poinsettias, chrysanthemums, daffodils, and even tulips. Remove any and all hazardous plant life from your home or garden if your pet is the type to nibble.

Human Foods

Plenty of human foods—chocolate, candy, grapes and raisins, onions, garlic, alcohol, caffeine, salt, and more—aren’t safe for pets. Never leave harmful substances out on countertops or tables where pets may be able to reach them.

Human Medications

Did you know that everything from aspirin and cough syrup to prescription pills and anti-depressants can harm a pet if they were to ingest too much? It’s important to keep your medicine cabinet tightly sealed at all times. Remember: a pet with strong jaws might be able to chew right through a flimsy plastic cap!

Call your veterinarian Olathe, KS to find out about other potential pet toxins.

Cats, Milk, and Dairy Products

Cats and milk just seem to go together. You may be surprised to learn that the two actually don’t mix! Learn more here from your vet in Ellicott City, MD.

Why Can’t Cats Drink Milk?

The majority of adult cats are lactose-intolerant, meaning that they don’t possess enough lactase in the digestive system to digest lactose, the primary enzyme of milk. Drinking too much milk will likely cause an upset stomach, diarrhea, or even vomiting.

What About Kittens?

Kittens drink their mother’s milk while nursing, yes. This is, however, the only time in a cat’s life cycle that milk is a nutritional necessity. As most cats age, they produce less lactase. By the time they’re fully grown, most cats are totally lactose-intolerant.

Is Other Dairy Okay?

Since other forms of dairy like yogurt or cheese generally contain less lactase than milk, they may be safer to feed to your feline friend. Still, it’s important not to go overboard. It’s safer to stick to cat treats or small bits of cooked meat instead—your cat will probably like these items more anyway!

Do you have questions about your cat’s diet or nutrition? Contact your animal hospital Ellicott City, MD for help.

How Do You Tell When Your Bird is Sick?

If you’re a bird owner, it’s up to you to know when your feathered friend isn’t feeling up to snuff. Here, your North Phoenix, AZ veterinary professional gives you a crash course in some of the most common signs of illness in birds.

Cere Trouble

Your bird’s cere is the area above the beak that houses the nostrils; think of it as your bird’s nose. If you see discharge coming from this area, or if you notice crusts, redness, inflammation, or anything else out of the ordinary, it’s time to notify your vet.

Ruffled Feathers

While birds do ruffle their feathers normally, they don’t typically keep them ruffled for long periods of time. If you’ve noticed that your bird has kept the feathers ruffled for a full day or longer, a trip to the vet’s office is in order.

Loss of Appetite

Like many other pets, a loss of appetite isn’t healthy in birds. If you’re noticing a lot of leftover food in your feathered companion’s bowl recently, tell your veterinarian. Everything from illness to infection to injury could be to blame.

Set up an appointment with your veterinary clinic North Phoenix, AZ if your bird needs prompt veterinary attention.

Dental Health Tips for Cats and Dogs

Our pets’ dental health is extremely important—did you know that oral issues are some of the most common health problems that veterinarians treat amongst domesticated dogs and cats? Don’t let your pet fall into the statistic; use these tips from an Aurora, CO veterinarian to keep their teeth and gums healthy.

Quality Diet

Good dental health starts with a great diet. Make sure your pet is eating a high-quality, nutritionally balanced food that is appropriate for their breed, age, weight, and body condition. Ask your veterinarian for a recommendation if you think your pet’s diet could be improved.

Good Chew Toys

Chew toys aren’t just a lot of fun, they help keep the teeth and gums strong. Plus, they scrape away some of the soft plaque on your pet’s tooth surfaces, removing it before it hardens into tartar.

Veterinary Visits

The best way to keep your pet’s dental health in check is by keeping regular appointments with your veterinarian. This way, your veterinary professional can catch any problems early on, before they’re allowed to develop into serious issues. If your pet needs a dental examination, set up an appointment with your vet Aurora, CO as soon as possible!

Where to Put Your Cat’s Litter Box

The placement of your cat’s litter box is extremely important—our feline friends tend to be rather picky! Here, your San Jose, CA vet gives you a quick rundown of where to put your cat’s bathroom.

Far from Food

Try to locate your cat’s box away from her food and water dishes. The expression about not wanting to use the bathroom where you eat applies to our feline friends as well! Cats have been known to shun either their bathroom or their food bowl if the two are placed in close proximity.

Quiet Zone

Would you want to use the bathroom where it’s crowded and noisy? Neither does your cat! Put your cat’s litter box in a quiet area without a lot of human or pet traffic. This way, your cat won’t be disturbed and can do her business in peace.

Easily Accessible Location

Don’t forget to check that your cat’s box is accessible at all times, even when you’re not home. It’s all too easy for a screen door or other obstacle to block off the room, forcing your cat to go elsewhere!

Talk to your San Jose, CA veterinarian for more advice on your cat’s litter box habits.