All posts by rsuser

Pet Poisons in Your Home or Apartment

Did you know that you likely already have a few pet poisons in your home, no matter how conscientious you are about pet safety? Here, your Columbia, MD veterinarian tells you what to look out for and how to prevent the danger.

Toxic Foods

Grapes, raisins, onions, garlic, chives, leeks, scallions, shallots, chocolate, candy, alcohol, macadamia nuts, avocado, caffeine, salt, fatty foods, and much more all present a risk to our four-legged friends. Store all dangerous foods where they belong—inside closed cabinets or the refrigerator, where your pet can’t reach.

Pesticides

Do you use pestsicides in or around your home to ward off insects or intruding rodents? Remember: these products are poisonous! Don’t let your pet anywhere near them, and consider non-toxic alternatives like mechanical traps for your pet’s safety.

Poisonous Plant Life

There are all sorts of poisonous plants and flowers out there, including lilies, dieffenbachia, elephant ear, aloe plants, rubber plants, ivy, oleander, azalea/rhododendron, daffodils, tulips, and much more. Remove any offenders from your home, garden, or landscaping right away so that your pet stays safe!

Would you like further advice on keeping your pet safe at home? Give your veterinary clinic Columbia, MD a call today.

Preparing for a Puppy

Are you going to be bringing home a puppy soon? Congratulations! Below, your Greenville, SC veterinarian offers some advice on getting prepared ahead of time.

Supplies

Consider everything you’ll need for your puppy to stay happy and healthy. This includes puppy food, food and water dishes, a crate, a carrier, a leash and collar, ID tags, puppy treats, a bed, and toys. You may also want puppy training pads and a few baby gates.

Training Tips

Crate training and potty training will be the two most important things to teach your puppy early on. If you’d like advice on these training methods, contact your veterinarian. He or she can also put you in touch with professional animal trainers or behaviorists if you need help.

Safety

Check through each room in your home that your new addition will be allowed into. Remove any and all hazards, such as toxic materials, sharp edges, small items that could be choked on or swallowed, dangerous plants, wires and cords, etc. It’s also a good idea to pick up shoes, purses, and clothing from the floor so Fido can’t chew on them.

For more help with puppy care, contact your  animal hospital Greenville, SC today.

Road Trips With Your Dog

It sure is a lot of fun to take your dog on a road trip with your family. Whether you’re going on a day trip or a week-long vacation, it’s important to keep Fido’s safety in mind! Use these tips from a Lansing, MI veterinarian to make sure that everything goes smoothly.

Car Travel Tips

It’s always best to keep your dog secured in his crate while in the car. This greatly reduces the chance of injury or escape. If your dog gets carsick, try cracking a window and taking frequent pit stops. Don’t feed your pooch in the hours before the car ride begins.

Identification and Training

Make sure your pet is identified with ID tags, a microchip, or both. These can be lifesavers in the event that your dog runs away or gets lost. Also ensure that Fido knows some basic recall commands, like “here” or “come.” Ask your vet if you want help with training techniques.

Your Destination

Always be sure to check that your destination is pet-friendly; not all motels, hotels, beaches, public parks, and other areas are as dog-friendly as we might like!

Ask your veterinary Lansing, MI professional about more travel tips for dogs.

Exercising Fido Indoors

Sometimes, it’s just easier to exercise your dog in the comfort of your own home. This could be because of schedules, weather, or many other factors—the question is, how do you go about doing it? Below, your Lafayette, LA vet tells you how to exercise your canine companion indoors.

Toys

There’s no substitute for toys—not only do they provide your pooch with hours of fun, he’ll get great exercise romping around with them. Make sure to purchase toys that don’t have small parts, which could be chewed off, choked on, or swallowed.

Hall Run

Does your home have a hallway? Clear all breakables from the hall and use it as a dog run. Toss a ball down the hallway and have your pet return it to you; it’s an easy exercise method and provides your pooch with tons of fun!

Staircase

Stand at the top of the staircase and call Fido to you. Then, reward him with a toy or treat and go to the bottom of the steps to repeat the process. Quick, simple, and effective!

Do you have questions about your dog’s exercise needs? We’re here to help! Make an appointment with your pet clinic Lafayette, LA.

Onion Toxicity in Your Dog

Did you know that onions, and foods related to them, are one of the most dangerous pet toxins out there? Our canine companions are the most commonly affected! Your Marietta, GA veterinarian tells you more below.

Symptoms

The main danger of onion toxicity is a condition called hemolytic anemia; the toxin causes your dog’s red blood cells to rupture. Associated symptoms include nausea, drooling, vomiting, diarrhea, and—without treatment—seizures and death.

Garlic is even more potent than onions themselves. Other dangerous foods related to onions and garlic include leeks, chives, scallions, and shallots.

Treatment

Your dog’s stomach may need to be flushed, or vomiting will be induced to rid the system of the toxin. Activated charcoal may also be administered to slow the poison’s absorption. Supportive therapies like fluid replacement or oxygen supplementation may be needed, and blood transfusions are necessary in severe cases.

Prevention

Of course, it’s best to prevent an episode of onion poisoning entirely. Restrict your dog’s access to onions, garlic, chives, leeks, scallions, and shallots at all costs! Store such foods inside cabinets or the refrigerator.

For more information on onion poisoning, as well as other toxic human foods, call your veterinary clinic Marietta, GA.

Basic Kitten Care

Are you going to be bringing home a kitten in the near future? Use these basic care tips from a Rochester, NY veterinarian to make sure you’re prepared!

Diet

Your kitten will need a specially formulated kitten food, rather than normal cat food, until she’s a bit older. For extremely young kittens, synthetic milk formulas may be necessary. Talk to your veterinarian to find out about your kitten’s nutritional needs and get a recommendation on a proper food choice.

Litter Box

Make sure you have a litter box set up in a quiet, out-of-the-way part of the home for your kitten’s use. Placing them gently into the box initially should be sufficient to get them to use it, but ask your vet for more tips on litter-box training.

Safety Tips

Before kitty comes home, make sure to check your entire home for hazards like toxic plants, human foods, small objects that could be swallowed or choked on, sharp edges, etc. Take any steps necessary to remove these hazards and keep your kitten safe.

You’re not alone in your quest to keep your new pet happy and healthy—we’re here to help! Call your Veterinary Clinic Rochester, NY for further advice.

Chocolate Toxicity in Cats

Chocolate and animals don’t mix—your cat is no exception. Although cats aren’t likely to go out of their way to ingest chocolate, it’s still a big risk! Learn more below from a vet in Mt. Pleasant, SC:

Symptoms

The symptoms of chocolate toxicity in cats include drooling, listlessness, lethargy, vomiting, diarrhea, and—without treatment—collapse, coma, and even death. All types of chocolate (milk, dark, semi-sweet, white, powdered, baking chocolate, etc.) can cause symptoms. That’s because all chocolate contains theobromine and caffeine, the chemicals that cause the reactions.

Treating Poisoning

If you know or suspect that your cat has ingested chocolate, rush them to the nearest veterinary emergency room right away. Your vet may induce vomiting or administer activated charcoal to stop the poison’s absorption in your cat’s system. As Fluffy recovers, supportive measures like oxygen supplementation or fluid therapy might be needed.

Prevention Tips

Of course, preventing chocolate poisoning is far easier than treating it after the fact. All it takes is restricting your cat’s access to any and all chocolate. Store chocolate and foods that contain it inside cabinets, rather than leaving it out on countertops.

Talk to your Animal Hospital Mt. Pleasant, SC professional for more information.

How to Help Your Dog Lose Weight

Is your dog looking a little round on the edges? Obesity is quite common amongst our canine companions! Below, your Riverside County, CA veterinarian tells you how to help Fido lose the extra pounds.

Diet Choice

If your dog is receiving a budget food with a lot of “filler” material, he or she isn’t getting the proper nutrients that they need for a healthy lifestyle. Sometimes, switching your dog’s diet is necessary for helping them to lose weight—ask your vet to recommend a high-quality food choice.

Portion Control

If your pet is being overfed, it’s undoubtedly contributing to obesity. Always feed your dog in proper portion sizes; consult your pet food packaging or ask your veterinarian for advice.

Exercise

Of course, your dog won’t lose weight effectively without regular exercise. Make sure your canine companion exercises every day via walks and playtime. This will help your pooch burn calories, keep the joints and muscles limber, and give them an outlet for their pent-up energy.

Do you need help having your dog lose weight? Have further questions about your dog’s health and wellness needs? We’re here to help! Set up an appointment at your Vet Riverside County, CA today.

Puppy-Proofing 101

Are you about to bring home a brand-new puppy? Remember to prepare your home ahead of time! Use these tips from your Frisco, TX vet to puppy-proof your home or apartment.

Block Off Rooms

Consider using dog gates or baby gates to block off certain rooms, at least for a time. For one, this will be less overwhelming for your puppy. Secondly, it will be far easier to keep an eye on your pet and minimize risk.

Check for Hazards

Go through each room in the home that your puppy will be allowed into. Remove any and all hazards, such as toxic plants or cleaning chemicals, small objects that could be choked on, human foods, sharp objects or edges, etc. It’s also a good idea to store shoes, pursues, and valuables safely away so that your pup can’t gain access.

Family Meeting

Before you bring your new addition home, hold a family meeting to make sure everyone is on the same page regarding your pup’s training, schedule, dietary needs, etc. It’s very important that your pup receives the same information from all family members!

Need help preparing for your puppy’s arrival? Call your Vet Frisco, TX today for more tips.

Indoor Cat Exercise Tips

Do you have an indoor cat? It’s important to get them the exercise they need. Use these tips from an Omaha, NE veterinary professional to get your feline friend moving.

Cat Tower

Cat tower structures are great for getting your cat exercise, and cats are able to play on them whenever they’d like—even when you’re not home. These items have multiple levels and often come with built-in toys and scratching posts. Purchase one at your local pet supply store or retail outlet.

Toys

Cat toys provide your feline friend with hours of fun. What she may not realize is that she’s also getting healthy exercise in the process! Make sure your cat has a rotating selection of fun toys to keep her occupied and active.

Walks

Not all cats are keen on walking, but some enjoy it quite a bit. It can provide your indoor cat with a fun excursion into the great outdoors, and it provides good exercise. Talk to your vet for advice on choosing a cat harness and on getting started with walks.

Contact Your Pet Clinic Omaha, NE is here to help with all of your feline friend’s healthcare needs. Make an appointment at the office today!