Traveling By Air With a Pet

There are several reasons why you might need to fly with your pet: if you’re going on an extended vacation, moving cross-country, or if you have a therapy animal, for example. Allow your veterinarian London, ON to tell you about a few considerations to make when flying with a pet.

Check the Airline’s Policy

Not every airline allows pets. Those that do will impose guidelines and restrictions. Sometimes, pets can ride along in the cabin with you, but sometimes they must be “stowed” in specialized areas made for pets. Make sure you know what you’re getting into before booking!

Get Your Pet Ready

Make sure your pet is healthy enough to travel by air by visiting the vet’s office for a full exam. Your vet will be able to update your pet’s vaccines and pest control products as needed and give your pet the all-clear for takeoff.

Don’t Forget to Check the Destination

Don’t forget to check to make sure your destination is pet-friendly, whether it’s a friend’s house or hotel. If you don’t, you might land yourself and your pet in hot water!

Call your veterinary clinic London, ON to set up an appointment for your pet’s next exam.

What to Put in Fido’s Emergency Kit

Does your dog have an emergency kit? Being prepared ahead of time is just about the only way to deal with an emergency situation head-on. Read on as your veterinarian Burlington, ON tells you what to include in your dog’s emergency care kit.

Medical Supplies

Most of your pup’s kit will be comprised of first-aid supplies. This includes things like gauze, bandages, a pet thermometer, a pet-safe disinfectant, a styptic powder or pen, tongue depressors, a few soft towels, tweezers, and a few pairs of latex gloves. You might also want to include a supply of any medications your dog takes.

Medical Records

Pack proof of ownership and vaccinations, as well as documentation of any recent medical work your pooch has had done, in a waterproof bag. These documents can prove invaluable if you have to visit an unfamiliar vet’s office or shelter facility.

Long-Term Supplies

If you think there’s ever a chance you’ll be stuck away from home with your dog—perhaps due to a natural disaster—pack a few long-term supplies like canned food (don’t forget a can opener!), bottled water, dishes, blankets, and a collar and leash.

Call your vet clinic Burlington, ON today to learn more.

3 Care Tips for Senior Dogs

Do you have senior dogs on your hands? It’s important to pay attention to our senior canine’s care needs so that they can remain healthy throughout their golden years! Use these tips from a veterinarian Murrieta, CA to do just that.

Feed the Right Food

Your senior dogs dietary needs are quite different now that he’s older. Make sure his food choice reflects that. Your dog should be eating a senior formula made specifically for his advanced age; ask your vet for a recommendation.

Keep Up With Preventatives

It’s all too easy for a pest infestation to sideline your aging companion’s health. Don’t let fleas, ticks, or worms harm your dog. Talk to your veterinarian about regular preventative medications for your pooch if your dog isn’t already on them—they can be real lifesavers!

See the Vet Regularly

At this stage of life, there’s no reason that your dog shouldn’t be seeing the veterinarian regularly. That way, any health concerns can be caught early on and treated accordingly before they’re allowed to progress into something worse.

Does your dog need a veterinary checkup? Want more advice on great senior dog care? Call your pet clinic Murrieta, CA for help.

What Your Dog’s Tail is Used For

It’s one of the most dynamic parts of your dog’s whole body: the tail is an essential part of Fido’s anatomy, but it’s something we usually don’t pay much mind to. But what does your dog use the tail for? Learn more here from a veterinarian Plano, TX.

The Original Purpose

Originally, the ancient wild dogs of old used their tails for balance, just like many wild animals do today. The tail was a sort of balancing weight to be used when traversing narrow ledges or making sharp turns at a high speed.

Spreading Scent

Every dog has its own unique scent, and it’s one of several ways that canines communicate amongst each other. The tail helps to spread your dog’s scent from their anal glands. This is why a dog tucks his tail between the legs when they’re scared—they don’t want to release their own scent.

Communication

The main use of the tail today is for communication with other dogs and humans. For instance, a wagging tail might mean your dog is happy, while a stiff tail indicates alertness or alarm.

Want to learn more about your dog’s behavior? We’re here to help. Call your vet clinic  Plano, TX.

Help Your Chubby Pet Lose Weight

It sure is cute when our pets are a little rounder, but it’s not very good for them. In fact, obesity is one of the leading causes of health trouble in pets! Here, learn how to slim your overweight pet down in this article from a veterinarian New Orleans, LA.

Change the Portion Size

Many times, all that a pet needs to start losing weight is a change in portion size. That’s because we tend to feed our pets too much at one time! Ask your vet for a recommendation on the proper portion size for your animal friend, and feed him or her in measured portion sizes during every meal.

Adjust the Food Choice

Sometimes, your pet’s diet just isn’t cutting it. That’s especially true if your pet is getting a budget diet full of filler material and empty calories. Talk to your vet about upgrading to a premium diet that suits your pet’s age and breed.

Exercise Your Pet

There’s no way your pet will slim down without exercise. Get your pet moving on a daily basis with walks around the block or play sessions.

Call your vet New Orleans, LA for help with your pet’s weight loss.

Quick Small-Dog Care Tips

Do you own a small dog? Thinking of adopting one soon? Our smaller canine companions (those about 10 pounds or under) have special care needs. Learn more here from a veterinarian London, ON.

Proper Identification

Since your diminutive dog is so small, he or she might have an easier time slipping out of open doors or cracked windows. That’s why it’s very important to keep your pup properly identified at all times using ID tags around the collar, a microchip, or both in tandem. Talk to your vet if your pet needs these identification measures.

Small Dog Diet

Your small dog’s nutritional requirements are far different than those of a large dog like a Great Dane, for instance. Ensure that your pup is eating the right food for their size—talk with your veterinarian to get a recommendation on a great food choice, and make sure that you’re feeding little Fido the proper portion size during mealtimes.

Regular Exercise

Just because your dog is small doesn’t mean they don’t need regular exercise. In fact, your companion should be moving on a daily basis!

For more tips on small-dog care, don’t hesitate to contact your animal hospital London, ON for help.