How to Protect Your Pet from Mosquitoes

Are mosquitoes active where you live? They’re more than a pesky nuisance for our animal friends because they can transmit heartworm and West Nile Virus, just as two examples. Keep your pet safe with these tips from a Savannah, GA veterinarian.

Preventative Medications

Keeping your pet on a high-quality heartworm preventative is the number-one way to make sure that they stay protected from mosquitoes. Even if your pet does get bitten, the medication will kill off the larvae before it can mature into adult heartworm and start causing problems. Contact your veterinarian if your pet needs preventatives.

Time it Right

Try taking your pet outdoors when mosquitoes are less active. Their highest activity times are in the dawn and dusk, so keeping your pet indoors at those times can be helpful.

In the Yard

Mosquitoes like to breed in standing water, so remove any still water sources in your yard like old tires or empty pots. Cut back tall grasses and dense shrubs, which also tend to attract mosquitoes and other pests.

Want to learn more about preventing pests from harming your animal friend? We’re always here to help. Contact your veterinary clinic Savannah, GA today to get started.

Easy Care Tips for Your Dog’s Coat

When was the last time you paid attention to your dog’s coat quality? It’s up to you to make sure Fido’s coat of fur stays in good shape. Use these tips from your Newmarket, ON veterinarian to do just that:

Feed a Great Diet

The first way to maintain your dog’s coat quality might not be what you expect: feeding him a high-quality diet. When your pup receives the proper nutrition through food, the skin and hair follicles stay healthy, producing a healthy coat of fur. Ask your vet to recommend a diet choice for your dog that suits his age, weight, and breed.

Brush Regularly

Brushing your dog regularly removes grime from underneath the skin, smooths out the fur, and spreads essential skin oils through the entire coat to moisturize it naturally. What do you have to lose? Ask your vet for a precise timeline on how often you should brush your dog.

Bathe Occasionally

The occasional bath—always using a canine-specific shampoo—is another good coat-care step. Just don’t overdo it, because bathing too frequently can dry out the coat and lead to an increase in shedding!

For greater coat-care tips, call your veterinary clinic Newmarket, ON.

Pica in Cats

Pica is a term that describes a condition in which cats eat a non-food material. That material could be fabric, wood, paper, socks, batteries, or almost anything else! Learn more about this dangerous problem in this article from a Rochester, NY vet.

Causes of Pica

There are many possible causes for pica, and a definitive cause isn’t always identified. Some possibilities include stress, dietary deficiencies, simple boredom, or an underlying medical cause.

Dangers of Pica

Obviously, your cat eating things she shouldn’t isn’t good for her. Ingesting foreign objects can result in choking, or an object can obstruct your cat’s digestive tract. Severe cases might require emergency surgery to remove a foreign object that is stuck in your cat’s digestive tract or intestines.

Treating Pica

If your cat seems to be nibbling on or eating non-food items, call your vet’s office to make an appointment. Your veterinarian will diagnose the problem and figure out the best way to move forward. Treatment may involve treating an underlying medical issue if there is one present or behavior modification and stress removal may be necessary.

Talk to your veterinarian Rochester, NY to learn more about pica in cats. We’re always here to help!

Can Dogs Get Poison Ivy?

We all know that poison ivy is irritating to humans. But can poison ivy affect our canine friends? It turns out that yes, dogs can suffer from toxic ivy, although it isn’t particularly common. Learn more here from an Aurora, CO veterinarian.

Symptoms of Poison Ivy

The major symptom of toxic ivy in dogs is similar to the main symptom in humans: an itchy red rash. The rash is often accompanied by blistering and swelling. Dogs can also be affected by poison oak and poison sumac, both causing similar symptoms. The rash is most likely to appear on areas that aren’t completely covered by fur.

Treating Poison Ivy

If your dog is suffering from toxic ivy, you’ll need to bathe them with warm water and dish soap, oatmeal shampoo, or a dog shampoo designed to reduce inflammation. Wear latex gloves so that the irritating agent doesn’t come into contact with your own skin. Tell your vet if the problem continues.

Preventing Poison Ivy

Keep an eye out for the “leaves of three” that toxic plants are known for. That gives you and your dog the best chance for avoiding poison ivy!

Talk to your veterinary clinic Aurora, CO for more information.

3 Tips for Boarding Your Dog

It’s a safe bet that you’ll have to board your dog at one point or another. How do you go about finding the right facility to make sure your fido is comfortable? Here are three quick tips from a vet in Glendale, AZ to board your dog successfully:

Choose the Right Facility

Always choose a boarding kennel that you’re comfortable with. Make sure it’s clean and well-staffed; take a look around before your pup’s stay to observe general cleanliness, procedures, and safety. Ask if your fido can take a tour before their stay begins.

Keep it Familiar

Make sure to bring along your dog’s bed, toys, and dishes from home. Having some items from his normal space will go a long way toward helping your fido to have a familiar sense around him while you’re gone.

Keep Goodbyes Short

Don’t go overboard with goodbyes when dropping your dog off at the kennel, tempting as it may be. By making a big deal out of leaving your dog there, your dog is only getting more excited and maybe more poorly behaved while you’re gone.

Is your dog healthy enough for boarding? Call your vet Glendale, AZ to make absolutely sure.

What You Need to Know About Your Cat’s Hairballs

Have you ever witnessed your cat coughing up a hairball? It’s certainly not pleasant, but is it harmful for your cat in any way? Why does it happen at all? Below, your Burlington, ON vet provides you with answers on your cat’s hairballs. 

Why Do Hairballs Form? 

Your cat grooms herself frequently and swallows a lot of the loose hair on her coat while doing so. Most of that hair moves through the digestive tract and gets expelled naturally in the feces, but some of it stays in the gut. That hair clumps into a hairball, which is eventually regurgitated. 

Are Hairballs Harmful?

No, hairballs are natural and don’t harm your cat in the least. However, if your cat has suddenly started coughing up hairballs frequently, or if she’s gagging and retching without producing anything, call your vet. Your cat could have a medical issue causing her to shed more, or she could be choking! 

How Can I Minimize Hairball Production?

Feed your cat a high-quality diet to keep the coat in good shape and minimize shedding. Brush Fluffy regularly to trap fur in the brush itself, preventing her from swallowing it. 

Contact your veterinarian Burlington, ON for more information.

Preventative Essentials for Pets

Why bother dealing with a problem at all if you can prevent it in the first place? When it comes to your dog or cat’s health, you can do just that! Here, your Burlington, ON veterinarian gives you tips on your pet’s preventative essentials.

Pest Control

Fleas, ticks, and parasitic worms pose a real threat to your four-legged friend. Your best bet is to keep these parasites at bay ahead of time by using preventative medications. Talk to your veterinarian about a flea-and-tick control medication, as well as a heartworm preventative, to keep your animal friend protected all year round.

Vaccines

Vaccinations against dangerous diseases like hepatitis, parvovirus, distemper, and rabies are essential for almost every pet. These diseases are far more difficult to eradicate after the fact than they are to avoid in the first place! Your veterinarian can tell you what vaccines your pet needs, so call the office today.

Veterinary Checkups

When your veterinarian examines your pet regularly, any health concerns are caught early and can be treated as necessary. That makes for a happier, healthier pet in the long-term!

Ready to make your pet’s next appointment? Call your veterinary clinic Burlington, ON. We’re here to help!

Understanding Your Cat’s Favorite Plant

Does your feline friend enjoy catnip? For most of our cats, it’s their absolute favorite indulgence. Below, your London, ON veterinary professional tells you more about your cat and catnip.

What is Catnip?

Catnip is actually an herb, classified together in the same family of plants as common herbs like mint and basil. In fact, you can purchase catnip at many greenhouses. In a pet store, you’ll find a processed and dried version of the wild plant—that’s raw catnip, and catnip can also be infused into sprays or included in cat toys.

Is Catnip Harmful?

No, catnip is not harmful for your feline friend. It causes a chemical reaction in your cat’s brain that only lasts a few minutes, and it doesn’t harm your cat in the least. Your pet can’t become addicted to catnip or overdose on the herb, so give it to her as often as you’d like.

Why Doesn’t My Cat React?

Does your cat not do much when given catnip? If she doesn’t possess a particular gene, inherited from her parents, catnip won’t have any effect! Don’t fret—your cat is perfectly healthy.

Learn more about catnip by contacting your veterinarian London, ON today.