Removing a Tick from Your Cat

Would you be prepared to remove a tick from your cat’s skin if you found one? While your cat’s flea-and-tick preventative should help avoid the problem, ticks can still latch on to our feline friends. Here, your veterinarian Rochester, NY tells you what to do.

Prepare

Get everything you’ll need in one place before you set about removing the tick. You’ll need a pair of tweezers, rubbing alcohol as well as a small jar filled with the rubbing alcohol, a gauze pad, and a pair of latex gloves to protect your hands.

Remove the Tick

Grasp the tick with your tweezers, as close to your cat’s skin as possible, and pull straight out with even pressure. It’s important not to twist or jerk the tick as you’re pulling because this could cause the tick’s pincers to remain in your cat’s skin. Once you’ve completely removed the tick, drop it into your jar and apply more rubbing alcohol to the site.

Next Steps

Wash your tweezers with more alcohol to disinfect them. Keep a close eye on the bite area for the next few weeks. If you see something abnormal, contact your animal hospital Rochester, NY right away for help.

Three Flowers That Are Toxic to Pets

Many plants are toxic to pets, but flowers sometimes get overlooked. The truth is that many kinds of flowers can poison a pet! Here, your Glendale, AZ vet tells you about three of the most common offenders:

Lilies

Lilies are most dangerous for our feline friends, but it’s possible that they could harm dogs as well. Asiatic, Easter, Japanese, stargazer, red lilies, tiger lilies, wood lilies, and daylilies are all toxic varieties of the flower, among others. If you plant lilies in your yard or keep them indoors in bouquets, keep your pets away!

Chrysanthemums

Chrysanthemums are very common and contain pyrethrins, lactones, and other poisonous toxins that your pet shouldn’t ingest. Symptoms of toxicity include vomiting and diarrhea, drooling, and uncoordinated movements.

Tulips

You may be surprised to learn that tulips are also dangerous for pets. The bulb is the most hazardous part as it contains the highest concentration of the toxin—it can cause symptoms like hyper-salivation, depression, and vomiting and diarrhea.

Would you like to know what kind of toxic plants and flowers are most common in the area where you live? Contact your veterinary clinic Glendale, AZ today for help. We are always here for you!

Myths About Rescue Pets

Unfortunately, there are a few myths and misconceptions out there when it comes to shelter pets. The bad things you may have heard just aren’t true! Let your vet Westminster, MD set the record straight in this article:

Shelter Pets Are Poorly Behaved

This isn’t true—the vast majority of pets in shelters are perfectly well-behaved. Poor behavior isn’t a common reason that pets come to shelters in the first place; issues like abandonment and uncontrolled breeding are much more likely the reason that a pet arrived at a shelter.

Shelter Pets Are Dirty

On the contrary, pets and shelter facilities must be kept very clean and sanitary so that disease doesn’t spread in an area with so many animals housed in close quarters. Even if a pet is dirty when they arrive at a shelter, they’re quickly bathed and groomed!

Shelter Pets Are Old

This couldn’t be further from the truth. There are pets of every age in shelters, from older animals to puppies and kittens.

Are you in the market for a new pet? Bring your new companion to your animal hospital Westminster, MD to get them started off on the right paw. We’re always here to help!

Finding a Lost Cat

No one wants to think about their cat escaping. IF your feline friend manages to slip out, though, what do you do? Here are a few tips from a Frisco, TX vet.

In Your Yard

If you can’t immediately find your cat in your yard, try going out at about 2:00 a.m. with a few cats treats or a can of food. Even if your cat has ventured out of the yard, he or she may hear the sound in the quiet of the night and return to your yard.

Putting Up Flyers

If your cat is gone for longer than a full day, you might want to post flyers around your neighborhood. Include your contact information, and even consider offering a small reward. Enlisting the public’s help is one of the best ways to find your lost cat!

Preventing the Problem

Prevent the problem initially by being extremely cautious when coming and going from your home. Make sure all windows contain sturdy screens. Keep your cat’s identification updated in the form of a microchip, ID tags on the collar, or both.

Does your cat need identification measures? We’re here to help. Contact your vet clinic Frisco, TX right away.