Protecting Your Pet From Xylitol

Xylitol is a dangerous pet poison, and you might already have it in your home. It’s an artificial sugar commonly used in gums, candy, toothpaste, and other goods. Here, your Roanoke, VA veterinarian tells you more about xylitol poisoning in pets.

Symptoms

The symptoms of xylitol poisoning can begin to affect a pet in as little as 30 minutes after initial ingestion, and it only takes a few grams of the substance to cause poisoning. Symptoms include lethargy, drooling, vomiting and diarrhea, and—if treatment isn’t given promptly—seizures, coma, and even death.

Treatment

Rush your pet to the emergency room if you suspect or know that they’ve ingested a xylitol-sweetened product. The stomach may need to be flushed, and activated charcoal could be given to slow the poison’s absorption. Pets might need oxygen supplementation, fluid and electrolyte replacement, and other measures to make full recoveries.

Prevention Tips

Luckily, it’s easy to prevent xylitol poisoning. Never leave candy, gum, or sweet treats on countertops or tables where pets could reach. Keep all supply closets and bathroom cabinets shut tightly.

To learn more about xylitol and how it affects pets, call your animal hospital Roanoke, VA  today. We’re here for you!

Care Tips for Brachycephalic Dog Breeds

Do you have a brachycephalic dog? These breeds have squashed, flat faces and bulging eyes; the pug, Boston terrier, English and French bulldog, and the Pekingese are a few examples. Here are some quick tips from an vet Aurora, CO to keep your brachycephalic dog breed healthy.

Dental Tips

Because of your brachy’s unique facial structure, the teeth often crowd together. This means that dental issues are relatively common amongst these types of dogs. Brush your dog’s teeth regularly with a canine-formulated toothpaste, and schedule regular oral examinations at the vet’s office.

Keeping Fido Cool

It’s easy for brachycephalic dogs to overheat and experience respiratory problems, especially thanks to their small nostrils, elongated soft palate, and narrow windpipe. Don’t allow your dog to stay outdoors in hot weather for long periods, and keep exercise sessions short.

Avoiding Stress

Do your best to keep your brachycephalic dog from becoming stressed out. Like overheating and over-exercising, stress can lead to respiratory issues including trouble breathing. A brachycephalic dog will like a calm, low-key home environment best!

Does your brachycephalic dog need a veterinary exam? Want to know more about these wonderful breeds? We’re here to help. Call your veterinary clinic Aurora, CO.

Fluffy’s Hairballs

Have you ever seen your cat cough up a hairball? It’s not very pleasant looking, and it’s definitely no fun to clean up. Below, your veterinarians Marietta, GA tells you everything you need to know about your cat’s hairball production.

What Causes Hairballs?

When your cat grooms herself, barbs lining the tongue pick up loose hair from the coat. Your cat swallows this hair, and most of it moves through the digestive tract and gets expelled in the feces. Some hair remains in the gut, though, and clumps together in a hairball—that eventually gets coughed up, along with some stomach fluid.

Are Hairballs Dangerous?

No, the occasional hairball is perfectly normal for a healthy cat. However, if your cat is coughing up hairballs frequently, or if they’re gagging and retching without actually producing a hairball, you’ll want to have them see the vet right away.

Can I Help My Cat Cough Up Fewer Hairballs?

Yes, there are a few steps you can take to minimize hairball production. First, feed Fluffy a great diet to keep the coat healthy and minimize shedding. Secondly, brush your cat daily to remove loose hair.

To learn more, call your animal hospital Marietta, GA.