How to Tell If Your Pet is Overweight

Many house pets are obese—did you know that nearly half of all dogs and cats are over their recommended weight limits? You may wonder if you own companion is carrying around too many excess pounds. Learn how to tell in this article from a vet Aurora, CO.

Physical Appearance

It sounds obvious, but physical appearance is, of course, one of the first indicators of obesity in pets. Straddle your pet and look at them from above—do their sides bulge out behind the rib cage, rather than curving in gently? Does the stomach area sag down when you look at Fido or Fluffy from the side?

Subtle Signs

Is your pet struggling to get up on furniture the way they once did? They might be too heavy to try. Are they chewing or licking incessantly at joints? Obese pets often develop arthritis, thanks to the excess weight pressing on their joints; many pets lick or chew at the painful area attempting to find relief.

Veterinary Checkup

Tell once and for all if your pet is obese by visiting your veterinary clinic Aurora, CO. Then, you and your vet can work together to return your pet to a healthy weight!

Quick Dental Care Tips for Your Dog

Don’t let your dog fall victim to dental health issues—they’re some of the most common problems that veterinarians diagnose in dogs! To keep your pooch’s pearly whites healthy, use these quick tips from a veterinarian Chattanooga, TN:

Fresh Water and Quality Diet

Provide your dog with a large dish of cool, fresh water to drink from at all times; this keeps him hydrated and helps flush the mouth out to remove leftover food particles, bacteria, and other grime. A healthy diet is also important, as the proper nutrients will keep your dog’s teeth and gums strong for years to come.

Brushing at Home

Brush your dog’s teeth at home using a pet toothbrush and a toothpaste formulated specifically for dogs. Focus on the outer tooth surfaces, where plaque tends to accumulate. It’s a great way to keep tartar at bay and stave off dangerous gum disease!

Veterinary Cleanings

Don’t forget about professional dental cleanings at the vet’s office. This procedure gets at the nooks and crannies of your dog’s mouth that brushing can’t—if your dog is due for a professional cleaning, schedule an appointment right away.

To learn more about canine dental health, call your vet Chattanooga, TN.

Tips on Road-Tripping With Pets

Are you going to be traveling by car with your animal companion in the near future? It can be a lot of fun to go road-tripping with your pet, but make sure they stay safe! Here are a few quick tips from a veterinarian Frisco, TX.

Car Safety

It’s best to keep your pet secured in their crate while in the car; this is the safest place for your pet in the event of an accident or sudden stop. For pets who easily get carsick, you may want to try cracking a few windows, playing soft music, or taking frequent breaks.

Identification

Identification is of paramount importance when traveling with your pet. Ensure that they are wearing ID tags on the collar, a microchip under the skin, or both at the same time. These measures are your best chance of getting your pet back in the event of an escape!

Check Your Destination

Before leaving home, check your destination to make sure pets are welcome. Not all hotels allow pets! You don’t want to arrive just to find out that your animal friend can’t stay.

For more road-tripping tips, contact your vet clinic Frisco, TX today. We’re always here to help!

Your Cat’s Hairballs

Hairballs are a part of life for most cat owners. Have you ever wondered if they’re safe for your feline companion? Below, your Livonia, MI vet covers the basics of Fluffy’s hairballs.

Why Do Hairballs Occur?

Cats ingest loose hair while grooming themselves; tiny barbs on the tongue pick it up, and your cat swallows it. Most of this swallowed hair passes through the digestive tract and gets expelled naturally in the feces, but some remains in the gut. This hair eventually clumps into a hairball, which is regurgitated by your cat.

Do Hairballs Cause Any Harm?

No, the occasional hairball shouldn’t cause your cat any harm. However, if your cat is gagging and retching but not producing a hairball, she could have a blocked airway—rush your pet to the emergency room. Additionally, vomiting is not the same as producing a hairball. If your cat is vomiting consistently, it’s time to see the vet.

Can I Lessen the Frequency of Hairballs?

Feed your cat a healthy diet; it will aid in digestive function and move hair through the gut properly. Brush your cat yourself to remove loose fur from her coat.

Call your veterinarian Livonia, MI to learn more!