Where to Place the Litter Box

If you’re going to be adopting a cat in the near future, or if you’re moving to a new home or apartment with your feline friend, you’ll have to choose where to put the litter box. Use these tips from a Tampa, FL vet to do so effectively:

Far From Food

Cats don’t prefer to eat their meals next to their bathroom; who can blame them? To be safe, position your cat’s food and water dishes in a separate area from the litter box. This will ensure that your cat doesn’t decide to shun her bathroom or avoid eating and drinking entirely.

Quiet Locale

No cat likes to do their business in a crowded, noisy area. Instead, they want to use their litter box in peace and quiet. Put it in an out-of-the-way location like a quiet bathroom, laundry room, or mud room to make sure that Fluffy isn’t disturbed while using her box.

Easy Access Positioning

Don’t forget to place the litter box in a location that’s easily accessible by your cat at all times, including when you’re not at home.

For more information on your cat’s healthcare needs, contact your veterinarian Tampa, FL. We’re always here to help!

Freshening Your Pet’s Breath

Most likely, your dog or cat’s breath doesn’t smell minty fresh at all times. If you would like to freshen up your pet’s breath, benefitting his or her dental health at the same time, use these tips from your veterinarians Lafayette, LA:

Water Dish

Fresh water works wonders for good dental health, and therefore for fresh breath. Make sure your pet has a large dish of cool water to drink from as they please. This flushes out the mouth regularly, getting rid of plaque and food particles, and keeps your pet hydrated at the same time.

Brushing at Home

Did you know that you can brush your pet’s teeth at home? Pick up a canine- or feline-formulated toothpaste and a pet toothbrush at your local pet supply store to get started. You can also use dental chews or sticks to help keep the teeth and gums clean; ask your vet for recommendations.

Professional Cleanings

Professional dental cleanings at the vet’s office get at the deep nooks and crannies of your pet’s mouth, rooting out plaque and tartar. It’s essential for good oral health and fresh breath!

To set up your pet’s next dental cleaning, contact your animal hospital Lafayette, LA.

Onion Poisoning in Dogs

Did you know that onions are a serious toxin for dogs? They can harm cats as well, but our canine companions are most commonly affected. Learn more below from your vet in Savannah, GA.

Symptoms of Poisoning

Onions—as well as related foods in the allium family like garlic, scallions, shallots, leeks, and chives—contain sulfuric chemicals that prove toxic to dogs.

Symptoms of onion toxicity include weakness, drooling, discolored urine, and diarrhea and vomiting. The sulfur compounds in onions and related foods attack your pet’s red blood cells, which can cause deadly anemia if the issue is left untreated.

Treatment Options

Activated charcoal may be given to slow the absorption of the toxin in your dog’s stomach, or the stomach may be flushed to rid the system of the poison. Fluid therapy and other supportive measures might be needed as your dog recovers.

Preventing Poisoning

It goes without saying that preventing poisoning by onion is your best choice! Restrict your dog’s access at all times; store onions and related foods in cabinets or the refrigerator, rather than leaving them out where pets could get a paw on them.

For more information on pet toxins, call your veterinarian Savannah, GA.

Cats and Milk Don’t Mix!

Cats and milk might seem like a match made in heaven. Did you know that this pairing is not as idyllic as it may seem? Learn more below from your vet in Fort Collins, CO.

Why Can’t Cats Drink Milk?

Most adult cats are lactose-intolerant, just like many humans can be. This means that the cat can’t properly digest lactose, the main enzyme found in milk. Too much milk, and your cat will likely experience an upset stomach, vomiting, or diarrhea!

Don’t Kittens Need Milk?

Yes, newborn kittens will require their mother’s milk—or a substitute milk product—for the proper growth in the early stages of life. As a cat ages, though, they begin to produce less and less lactase in the gut, meaning that they gradually become more and more lactose-intolerant.

Is Any Dairy Safe for Cats?

Other types of dairy like yogurt or cheese contain less lactose than milk, so your cat might respond better to those foods. However, no dairy is nutritionally necessary for cats! If you must give Fluffy dairy foods as a treat, keep the portions extremely small to be safe.

For more information on your cat’s diet, call your vet Fort Collins, CO.