The Most Common Pet Poisons at Home

No matter how vigilant you are about pet safety, you undoubtedly have a few pet toxins at home. The trick is knowing what they are and how to have your pet avoid the danger! Learn about some of the most common in-home pet toxins here from a Lakeville, MN vet.

Human Foods

Plenty of human foods—grapes and raisins, onions, garlic, chives, leeks, shallots, macadamia nuts, chocolate, candy, gum, alcoholic beverages, caffeine, salty foods, fatty items, and much more—can poison pets if they get their paws on them. Store harmful foods safely where pets can’t reach.

Pesticide Products

If you set up pesticide products in or around your to home to get rid of insects or rodents, make sure they’re placed carefully where pets can’t gain access. It’s all too easy for these products to poison our four-legged friends!

Toxic Plants

Dieffenbachia, elephant ear, lilies, tulips, daffodils, various types of aloe plants, ivy, poinsettias, certain rubber plants, rhododendron/azalea… the list of poisonous houseplants and flowers goes on and on! Check your home for toxic offenders, and remove them at once.

For more insight into pet poisons in your home, call your vet clinic Lakeville, MN. We’re here to help!

Is Your Bird Feeling Ill?

It’s not always easy to tell when your feathered friend isn’t feeling up to par. As a bird owner, you must be aware of the initial signs of illness! Here, your Sugar Land, TX vet gives you a crash course:

Cere Issues

Your bird’s cere is the area that houses the nostrils, located just above the beak. If you notice runny discharge coming from the nostrils, or if you see dried crusts around this area, it’s time to let your veterinarian know. This could be a sign of infection or disease.

Ruffled Feathers

Yes, bird ruffles their feathers occasionally. If they keep them ruffled for an extended period of time, though, something might be wrong. As a general rule, let your veterinarian know if your bird keeps the feathers ruffled for more than a fully day.

Loss of Appetite

A loss of appetite can mean many things, but it’s always safest to have your bird examined if you’ve noticed him leaving more kibble in his bowl. Better to be safe than sorry!

For more information on your bird’s health and behavior, call your veterinary clinic Sugar Land, TX today. We are here to help with all of your pet care needs!

Feed Your Cat an Age-Appropriate Diet

The nutritional needs of cats vary greatly depending on their age. To find out specifics on your particular cat’s dietary requirements, read on as a Portland, OR veterinarian provides some insight.

Kittens

Very young kittens need their mother’s milk—or a synthetic milk product if the mother’s milk isn’t available—for the first weeks of life to grow up healthy and strong. As they age, they’ll transition into a commercially available kitten diet. Ask your vet to recommend a great choice.

Adult Cats

Your adult cat should be fed a well-balanced, nutritionally complete food that contains all the carbohydrates, proteins, fats, vitamins, minerals, and other nutrients needed for a healthy life. This is the best way to keep them as healthy as possible for as long as possible!

Senior Citizens

By the time your cat is a senior, they’ll need to be fed a specially formulated diet made just for older cats. Your veterinarian can give you more information on transitioning your cat to foods, and they can recommend a high-quality senior food choice.

Does your feline friend need veterinary attention? Do you have questions about Fluffy’s dietary requirements? Set up an appointment to see your veterinary Portland, OR professional.

Explaining Your Cat’s Kneading Behavior

In cats, kneading behavior is characterized by an alternated pressing of the front paws into a soft object; that object might be a pillow, a blanket, or your leg! If you’ve ever wondered why Fluffy does this, learn more below from a vet in Aurora, CO.

Territory Marking

Your cat’s paw pads contain scent glands, and your cat releases the scent when she kneads an object. In this fashion, she’s marking the object as her own in order to mark her territory. Consider it an honor if your cat kneads you—she might be claiming you as her own!

Napping Prep

You’ve undoubtedly seen your cat knead before napping. Many experts believe that the ancient ancestors of our domesticated cats kneaded grass or dirt in the wild in order to soften it up for bedding. Our current cats’ behavior might be linked to the actions of generations before!

Nursing Instinct

Kittens knead their mother’s belly during nursing in order to stimulate milk production. It’s possible that your adult cat associates the action of kneading with the positive feelings of nursing!

Do you have questions about your feline friend’s behavior? Contact your pet clinic Aurora, CO for help from the professionals.