Storing Your Pet’s Food

How you store your pet’s food is important—by keeping food good for as long as possible, you’re making life easier on yourself and saving money in the long run! Below, your Olathe, KS vet offers a few tips on properly storing your pet’s food.

Dry Food

Dry kibble should be stored in an airtight container and kept in an area at room temperature. In many cases, the packaging your pet’s food came in is designed to keep the kibble as fresh as possible! Dry food will become stale if left exposed for a long period of time.

Wet Food

Unopened cans of wet pet food can stay good for quite a long time. Once opened, though, wet food is only good for about a week. Once you open a can, store the leftovers in the refrigerator and use them within a few days.

General Tips

The enemies of freshness when it comes to pet food are air, sunlight, and moisture. Try to keep your pet’s food in a dry, temperate, and airtight location to keep it fresh for as long as possible. Don’t put your pet’s food in direct sunlight.

Ask your Animal Hospital Olathe, KS for more food-storage tips.

The Basics of Catnip

You’ve undoubtedly heard of catnip, but how much do you really know about it? Find out all about catnip and its effects on our feline friends below from an Aurora, CO veterinarian.

What Exactly is Catnip?

Catnip is an herb, grouped into the same plant family as mint. It occurs naturally, having originated in Europe and since been spread all over the world. The catnip you’ll find in your local pet store is a dried and processed version of the wild plant.

How Does Catnip Affect Cats?

The oils of the catnip plant’s stem and leaves contains a chemical substance called nepetalactone. This substance affects the chemical makeup in your cat’s brain, eliciting the affects you see. The result is almost like that of an aphrodisiac, provoking a nearly sexual response! Cats may respond by becoming very excited and hyperactive, or they might become lackadaisical and prefer to lounge around in a sort of daze.

Is Catnip Safe?

Yes, catnip is perfectly safe for your feline friend. The effects will wear off after only a few minutes, and your cat will return to normal.

Do you have more questions about catnip? Contact your Pet Clinic Aurora, CO office today for help.

Danger Spots at Home for Your Pet

While your home is far safer for a pet than the great outdoors, most homes still come with their own set of dangers. Learn more below from a Livonia, MI veterinarian so that you can keep your pet safe.

The Kitchen

Sharp objects, toxic foods, hot surfaces—there certainly is no shortage of danger in your home’s kitchen! It’s safest to keep pets elsewhere when preparing meals. Make sure all harmful foods are kept inside cabinets or the refrigerator so that pets can’t gain access.

The Supply Closet

Bleach, air fresheners, carpet shampoo, furniture polish, household disinfectants… there are plenty of cleaning supplies that can harm a pet. Never allow your pet access to the supply closet, and keep them in another room if you’re using chemicals that give off strong fumes.

The Garage

Not only do cars come in and out of your garage, it’s home to a variety of other pet dangers as well. Pesticides may be stored there, as well as fertilizers, paint, and other chemicals. Sharp objects or small items that could be swallowed and choked on may also be present. It’s safest to keep pets out!

Call your Veterinary Clinic Livonia, MI for more healthcare advice.

Microchipping Your Dog

Does your dog have a microchip? If not, it may be time to act! Microchips are extremely effective and worth it for peace of mind. Learn more here from a vet in Indianapolis, IN.

Why Get a Microchip?

A microchip is a permanent form of identification—your dog can’t remove it the way he may be able to chew through or slip off a collar containing ID tags. This way, even if your dog escapes or gets lost unexpectedly, you’ll know he’s identified!

Do Microchips Replace ID Tags?

No, microchips are not intended to replace ID tags entirely. Most dog owners use the two identification methods in tandem. It never hurts to have a backup!

What’s the Procedure Like?

The procedure for getting your pooch a microchip is very easy. The chip itself is inserted under your pet’s skin using a specialized syringe, and all your dog will feel is a momentary pinch. It’s much like a regular vaccination, and the whole process only takes a few moments!

Do you have further questions about microchipping your dog? Ready to outfit your canine companion with a lifetime of proper identification? Set up an appointment to see your Pet Clinic Indianapolis, IN professional.

Xylitol Poisoning in Your Pet

Xylitol, an artificial sugar substitute used in many candies, gums, and certain baked items, is a dangerous pet poison. Below, learn about the symptoms of and treatment for xylitol poisoning, as well as how to prevent episodes, from your Frisco, TX veterinarian.

Symptoms

Symptoms of xylitol poisoning include lethargy, drooling, diarrhea, vomiting, collapse, and—without treatment—seizures, coma, and even death. It only takes a small amount of the substance to induce a toxic reaction, and symptoms usually manifest within 30 minutes of initial ingestion.

Treating Poisoning

Rush your pet to the local veterinary emergency room if you see or suspect that they’ve ingested a product containing xylitol. The stomach may need to be flushed in order to rid your pet’s system of the toxin. As your animal friend recovers, supportive measures like oxygen supplementation, fluid replacement, and more may be needed.

Prevention

It goes without saying that it’s easier to prevent an episode of xylitol poisoning rather than treat it afterward. Tightly restrict your pet’s access to all sweet treats—this is a simple way to avoid the issue entirely!

Consult your Vet Frisco, TX can tell you more about xylitol and other common pet poisons. Call the office today!

Don’t Believe These Three Cat Myths

Cats aren’t quite as forthcoming as dogs—in fact, they can be downright mysterious at times! For that reason, there are several myths that many believe about our feline friends. Your Greenville, SC vet clears up the confusion below:

Cats Always Land on Their Feet

This isn’t true. Cats, like any animal, can slip and fall, potentially injuring themselves seriously. In fact, shorter falls are even more dangerous, since cats don’t have time to right themselves before impact.

Cats Purr When Happy

This is a partial truth—cats may indeed purr when happy, but many experts believe that purring can also indicate a wide variety of other emotions. Purring may even be used to express fear, anxiety, or anger!

Cats Love Milk

Cats and milk just seem to go together, but it’s actually not a very good idea. Most adult cats are actually lactose-intolerant, meaning that they can’t digest milk and other dairy properly. Drinking too much milk will most likely result in vomiting, diarrhea, or an upset stomach at the very least.

Do you have further questions about your cat’s health and wellness? We are here to help! Call your Veterinarians Greenville, SC office today to make an appointment.