Dealing With Fido’s Excessive Shedding

Most dogs shed naturally; it’s simply a part of life! However, sometimes a dog’s shedding can get out of hand. Learn how to respond by following your Lafayette, LA veterinarian’s tips.

See Your Vet

First things first—see your veterinarian to have your dog examined. Various medical maladies, from infections to parasitic infestations to skin disease, could be the root cause of your dog’s sudden drop in coat quality. You’ll want to have any problems ruled out before moving on to other possibilities.

Groom Regularly

You’ll be amazed at what regular brushing can do for your dog’s shedding. It traps much of your dog’s loose fur in the brush itself, preventing it from winding up all over your carpet and furniture. Brushing also spreads essential skin oils through the coat, moisturizing the fur and reducing shedding initially.

Change the Diet

Did you know that your dog’s diet has a lot to do with his coat quality? Talk to your veterinarian about switching your dog’s diet if the coat quality isn’t up to par. When your dog gets the right balance of nutrients, the coat will improve!

Do you have questions about your dog’s healthcare? Call your Pet Clinic Lafayette, LA.

Getting Rid of Pet Odors at Home

Pets can occasionally start to smell up our homes a bit, especially if you have a young pet who has accidents on the carpet. Simple pet body odor can also affect the freshness around your home. Learn how to combat this problem with these tips from a Thousand Oaks, CA vet.

Grooming

Grooming your pet regularly is a great way to keep them smelling fresh. Brushing your animal friend removes dirt and grime from the skin and fur, traps loose hair in the brush itself, and reduces shedding by moisturizing your pet’s fur with natural skin oils. The occasional bath—using a pet-specific shampoo, of course—can also do wonders for pet odors.

Regular Cleaning

There’s no substitute for regular dusting and vacuuming; do so on a weekly basis to keep things fresh and clean. Don’t forget about spots like window sills, blinds, and other nooks and crannies where fur and dander may collect.

Odor-Control Products

Head to your local pet supply store if the problem persists. There is a wide variety of odor-control products on the market for every conceivable need.

Need help with your pet’s healthcare? We’re here for you! Call your Veterinarian Thousand Oaks, CA hospital today.

Beware of Plants That Can Poison Pets

Many plants and flowers aren’t safe for our animal companions, and common indoor plants are even more likely to be ingested. Here, your Marietta, GA vet tells you about three unsafe plants that you may already have in your home:

Lilies

Lilies are highly toxic to our feline friends, and they may be able to poison dogs as well. This goes for various lily varieties, including the stargazer, Tiger, Easter, day, and Japanese lily. Since lilies are often a part of bouquets or arrangements—particularly common around the holidays—use extra caution if you have curious pets.

Poinsettias

Poinsettias have a bit of an undue reputation; a pet would have to eat quite a lot to experience poisoning. That doesn’t mean it’s worth the risk! Plus, poinsettias could be sprayed with fertilizer or pesticides that aren’t good for pets. Keep your animal friend away to be safe.

Aloe Plants

Several types of aloe plants contain saponins, chemical substances that can prove toxic to pets. Don’t let your pet near the aloe plants in your home!

Would you like more advice on keeping your pet safe from plant and flower hazards? Contact your Veterinarian Marietta, GA. We’re here to help!

Caring for a Guinea Pig

Guinea pigs make wonderful—and adorable—pets for the right family. Are you considering adding one to your ranks? Read on as your North Phoenix, AZ veterinary professional tells you about the basic care they’ll require.

Cage

Your guinea pig will need a sturdy cage big enough to house exercise items, toys, food and water dishes, and hiding huts. The bottom must be solid to accommodate the wood-shaving bedding material that your pig will need. If you plan on getting more than one pig, choose a cage accordingly.

Dietary Needs

Guinea pigs eat a pellet diet, widely available in retail outlets and pet supply stores. The diet must be supplemented on a daily basis, though, with fresh fruits and vegetables like carrots, lettuce, cucumber, apple, and more. Factor this in to your pet’s budget, and ask your vet what other sorts of fruits and veggies your pig may enjoy.

Veterinary Visits

As with any pet, regular visits to the veterinarian’s office are essential for having your guinea pig remain in good health. Your pet ought to see the vet at least twice per year—call the office today to set up an appointment at your Veterinarian North Phoenix, AZ.