Rescue Dog Myths

Don’t believe everything you hear about adopting a dog from a rescue facility—there are plenty of misconceptions floating around! Your Minnetonka, MN veterinarian sets the record straight below.

Shelter Dogs Are Poorly Behaved

This couldn’t be further from the truth. Dogs aren’t relinquished to shelters solely because of poor behavior. Even dogs who do have behavioral issues are worked with closely by the shelter staff to improve their mannerisms.

Shelter Dogs Are Dirty

Think shelters, as well as the dogs housed inside of them, are dirty? Think again! Shelters must be kept to a high standard of cleanliness to prevent the spread of disease, so the dogs found in shelters aren’t dirty. Shelter staff members work diligently to keep everything clean.

Shelters Only Have Mutts

Don’t make the mistake of thinking that every dog in a rescue facility or shelter is a mixed-breed. In fact, you’re just as likely to find a purebred animal in a shelter; it all depends on chance. If you have your heart set on a particular breed of dog, tour your local shelters first before visiting a breeder or pet shop.

Talk to your veterinarian Minnetonka, MN professional for more information on dog adoption.

Preventative Healthcare Basics for Your Pet

Preventative healthcare is not only smarter and cheaper than treatment, it’s more effective for your pet’s well-being over time. Here, your Hinesville, GA veterinarian tells you about three important preventative measures that you should take.

Vaccination

All cats and dogs should be vaccinated against dangerous diseases like parvovirus, distemper, feline leukemia, parainfluenza, hepatitis, calicivirus, and rabies. Most pets get these shots when they’re as young as six weeks old. Talk to your veterinarian if your animal friend still needs vaccinated.

Pest Prevention

It’s much easier to prevent the dangerous of ticks, fleas, mosquitoes, and worms like heartworm and roundworm initially, rather than deal with a troublesome infestation or infection after the fact. Set your pet up with seasonal or year-round preventive medications to ward off these critters. Ask your vet for help if your pet doesn’t already have these safety measures in place.

Veterinary Visits

Of course, keeping regular appointments at your vet’s office is another great preventative healthcare measures. When your veterinary professional sees your four-legged friend regularly, he or she can catch any problems early and treat them before they can develop further. Make an appointment to see your vets Hinesville, GA today. Your pet will thank you!

Combating Your Dog’s Thunderstorm Anxiety

Many dogs don’t like thunderstorms—the loud booms and bright flashes simply terrify them! It’s also possible that dogs can sense air pressure changes that make them even more anxious. Combat thunderstorm anxiety with these tips from a Glendale, AZ veterinarian:

Clothing

Did you know that storm jackets are made just for the needs of dogs? Many dogs feel much more comfortable when wrapped in these items. Head to a local pet store to pick one up, and try asking for a recommendation from your veterinarian.

Safe Zone

Set up a safe zone in a quiet basement or back bedroom, complete with a comfortable pet bed, several plush blankets, and a few of your dog’s favorite toys. Lead your pooch to this area, perhaps wearing the storm jacket at the same time, to wait out the storm.

Desensitization

Talk to your veterinarian about a desensitization program. This involves playing recordings of thunderstorms at a low volume, then gradually increasing the volume over time. This process can desensitize your dog to the sounds of storms, making him less anxious when the real thing comes around.

Do you need help dealing with your canine companion’s anxiety? Call your veterinarians Glendale, AZ office.

Milk, Dairy, and Our Housecats

For whatever reason, cats and milk just seem to pair together. Believe it or not, the two don’t mix! Learn more below from a vet in Myakka, FL.

Why Shouldn’t Cats Have Milk?

Most adult cats are lactose-intolerant, meaning that they can’t properly digest lactose, the primary enzyme of milk and other dairy foods. This is the same condition that many humans suffer from! When a cat drinks too much milk, an upset stomach, vomiting, or diarrhea is likely to result.

Don’t Kittens Need Milk?

Yes, kittens require milk from their mother or a milk-formula substitute when they are young. This is the only time in a cat’s life, however, that milk is necessary. Cats generally grow more and more lactose-intolerant as they age, and won’t take kindly to milk once they’re fully grown.

What About Other Dairy?

Since other dairy products—yogurt, cheese, etc.—contain less lactose than pure milk, they may not cause problems as quickly as milk does. However, dairy is not a nutritional necessity for any adult cat. Keep the portion size extremely small if you must give your cat a dairy treat!

Contact your Vet Myakka, FL for more information on your cat’s dietary needs.