Your Home Already Contains These Pet Toxins

Did you know that your home almost certainly already contains various pet toxins? No need to panic, though—here, your Greensboro, NC veterinarian tells you how a few simple precautions will keep your pet safe.

Poisonous Foods

Plenty of human foods aren’t good for pets. The list includes chocolate, candy, gum, avocado, onions, garlic, shallots, chives, grapes and raisins, caffeine, alcohol, and more. Never leave harmful substances out on countertops or tables where pets may be able to gain access.

Human Medication

Everything from aspirin and cough syrup to antidepressants and over-the-counter medications can harm a pet if they manage to swallow too much. Remember: a determined pet with strong jaws may be able to chew right through a child-proof cap! Store your medications safely where pets can’t reach.

Cleaning Supplies

Your supply closet contains various materials that could harm a pet, including household disinfectants, window cleaner, furniture polish, and air fresheners. Keep your supply closet closed when you’re not using the chemicals inside. If you’re using something that gives off strong fumes, keep your pet elsewhere for the time being.

Would you like more advice on keeping your pet safe in the home? Call your vet clinic Greensboro, NC professional.

Keeping Pets Safe from Toxins at Home

Just about any typical home has a few potential pet toxins already inside of it, no matter how careful you are. The trick is to be prepared and preventative so that your pet stays safe! Learn more here from a Lafayette, LA vet.

Human Foods

Your kitchen probably already contains foods that are harmful to pets. The list includes onions, garlic, chives, avocado, chocolate, candy, grapes and raisins, salt, macadamia nuts, caffeine, alcohol, and more. Never leave something harmful in plain view of your pet—store dangerous foods in cabinets or the refrigerator instead.

Human Medicines

Don’t let your pet gain access to your medicine cabinet, because everything from cough syrup and aspirin to antidepressants and prescription drugs can poison them if they manage to ingest such a product. Also take care not to mix up your own medications and those of your pet.

Poisonous Plant Life

There is a long list of poisonous or irritating plants and flowers—ivy, oleander, lilies, chrysanthemum, daffodils, tulips, the sago palm, many aloe plants, poinsettias, and dieffenbachia plants are just a few—so make sure to remove anything harmful right away.

Call your pet clinic Lafayette, LA for more advice on keeping your pet safe.

Setting the Record Straight on Cat Myths

Our feline friends can be a little mysterious. Maybe that’s why so many people have misconceptions about them! Here, your Sun Prairie, WI vet tells you the truth about three common cat myths.

Cats Love Milk

Well, cats may love milk. Milk, however, won’t love them back! The vast majority of adult cats are lactose-intolerant, meaning they can’t digest milk properly and will likely experience vomiting and diarrhea if too much dairy is ingested at one time.

Cats Always Land on Their Feet

This couldn’t be further from the truth. While our cats are graceful, they’re just as likely to fall as any other pet. In fact, shorter falls are the most dangerous because cats don’t have the time to right themselves before impact.

Cats Purr When They’re Happy

This is a half-truth. Cats may purr to express happiness and contentment, yes, but purring is thought to indicate a variety of other emotions as well. Some experts believe that purring may actually indicate fear, nervousness, anxiety, or stress in many cats!

Do you have questions about your cat’s behavior? Does your feline friend need a professional veterinary examination? Set up an appointment today at your veterinarian Sun Prairie, WI.

Giving Your Kitten a Bath

It’s a good idea to get your kitten used to bath time early on in life—this way, he’ll grow up with bathing as a natural part of life. Here, your Mt. Pleasant, SC veterinarian gives you a step-by-step guide for bathing your young feline friend.

Gather Supplies

First, gather everything you’ll need. This includes a feline-formulated shampoo (available at pet supply stores and certain retail outlets), a large soft towel, and a few pet treats. Set yourself up at the tub or the kitchen sink, and consider putting down a rubber mat to help your kitty maintain his footing.

Rinse and Lather

Wet your kitten’s coat, taking care to avoid getting water in the eyes, nose, mouth, and ears. Now, dab a small amount of the shampoo into your cat’s coat and begin massaging it through the fur. Work from the neck downward.

Rinse, Dry, and Reward

Once your kitten has been thoroughly shampooed, rinse the coat out with fresh water. Now, dry them with the towel. Slip your kitty a few treats after bath time; this will help him learn that bathing is a positive experience.

Call your vet clinic Mt. Pleasant, SC for more great bathing tips.

Keeping Your Pocket Pet’s Dental Health in Check

Do you own a pocket pet like a gerbil, hamster, guinea pig, rat, or mouse? Their dental health is very important! Here, your Castle Hills, TX veterinarian tells you about three ways to make sure your furry friend’s oral health stays in tip-top shape.

Proper Diet

A great diet is essential for your pet’s overall well-being, dental health included. Your pet should be eating a high-quality commercial diet, and many rodent pets’ diets can and should be supplemented with fresh veggies, fruits, grains, and other foods. Ask your vet for specifics on your pet’s nutritional needs.

Good Chew Toys

Chew toys keep the teeth and gums strong, give your pet an outlet for their natural chewing instincts, and prevent them from chewing on the wire mesh of their cage or on other surfaces that aren’t healthy. Make sure your pet has plenty of good chew toys.

Veterinary Visits

Of course, having your pocket pet see your veterinarian on a regular basis is the best way to make sure their dental health—and overall wellness—stays in peak condition. If your pet needs an exam or if you have further questions on their healthcare, call your veterinarians Castle Hills, TX today.

What Dog Leash Should I Choose?

There sure are a lot of dog leashes out there—which one should you choose for your new canine companion? Your Livonia, MI veterinarian discusses the major leash types below.

Basic Leash

The vast majority of dogs will do just fine with a basic, standard-length leash, which is available at countless pet supply stores and retail outlets. They’re usually made of a nylon material and run anywhere from six to 10 feet long.

Retractable Leash

Retractable leashes can work to give your dog a little bit more space to roam; they feature a spring-loaded handle that lets your dog move away from you, then be stopped if you press a button on the handle. Just be careful not to let your dog surprise you—before you know it, they can be far out ahead of you and out of your control.

Training Leash

Dogs who are being trained sometimes use specialized leashes for that purpose. They may have specialized functions or be extra long. In general, don’t use one of these unless directed to do so by an animal trainer or your veterinarian.

Want a recommendation on a great dog leash? Call your Livonia, MI animal hospital for professional help.

Pocket Pet Dental Care

Do you own a pocket pet? For your guinea pig, hamster, gerbil, rat, or mouse, dental care is of great importance. Use these tips from your Livonia, MI vet to keep your furry friend’s oral health in peak condition.

Quality Diet

Great dental health starts with a great diet. Make sure your pocket pet is eating a high-quality commercial diet; don’t be afraid to ask your veterinarian to recommend a particular type and brand. Many pocket pets’ diets should also be supplemented with fresh fruits and veggies, so make sure you’re doing so.

Chew Toys

Chew toys give your pocket pet something to gnaw on besides the wire mesh of the cage, which could potentially fracture or break teeth. Provide your pet with plenty of pocket-pet-safe chew toys.

Veterinary Visits

Don’t forget about regular veterinary visits—the best way to keep your pet’s dental heath in check is to let the professionals take care of it! When your veterinarian sees your pet regularly, he or she can catch any problems early on, before they’re allowed to develop into more serious health issues. Set up an appointment at your Livonia, MI veterinary clinic today if your animal friend needs an exam.

Vaccination 101

Vaccination is an essential part of your pet’s health. If you’re new to pet ownership, you may not be familiar with the ins and outs of vaccines. Here, your Indianapolis, IN vet goes over the basics.

How Do Vaccines Work?

Vaccines introduce a small strain of a virus, called an antigen, to your pet’s immune system. In response, your pet’s system develops antibodies. This way, your pet’s body is prepared to recognize, lessen the symptoms of, and in some cases fight off the disease entirely should the real thing ever come along later in life.

What Vaccines Does My Pet Need?

Your pet needs the core vaccines, and these may have already been administered when your pet was young. Core vaccines include those that protect against distemper, calicivirus, rabies, parvovirus, and other serious and contagious diseases. Non-core vaccines aren’t essential for every pet, but they may be helpful for some based on exposure risk and other factors. Talk to your veterinarian for more details on the particular vaccines your pet needs.

How Do I Get Started?

Make an appointment at your Indianapolis, IN vet’s office if you have questions about your pet’s vaccinations or if your pet needs booster shots.

Xylitol and Pets: A Deadly Combination

Xylitol is an artificial sweetener that is used in many candies, gums, and certain baked goods. The substance is fine for human consumption, but it can prove deadly for our animal friends. Learn more here from your North Phoenix, AZ veterinarian.

Symptoms

The symptoms of xylitol poisoning—which usually appear within 30 minutes of ingestion—include weakness, disorientation, vomiting, and diarrhea. Without treatment, a pet may experience seizures, coma, and even death.

Treatment

Rush your pet to your local veterinary emergency room if you see or suspect that they’ve eaten a xylitol product. Your veterinarian may flush the stomach or administer activated charcoal to slow the poison’s absorption. IV fluid therapy, electrolyte replacement, oxygen supplementation, and other supportive treatments may be necessary as your pet recovers.

Preventing Poisoning

Of course, it’s far easier to prevent poisoning in the first place than deal with an episode. Luckily, it’s as simple as restricting your pet’s access to products that contain xylitol—never leave candies, gum, or baked goods out on countertops or tables where pets may be able to reach them. Store them inside closed containers or cabinets instead.

Ask your veterinarians North Phoenix, AZ for more information on xylitol and pets.

Your Home Already Contains These Pet Poisons

That’s right, you’ve already got these potential pet poisons in your home. Not to fear, though—it just takes awareness and precautionary measures to keep your four-legged friend safe. Learn more here from your vet in Marietta, GA.

Toxic Foods

Plenty of human foods can poison a pet! The list includes onions, garlic, chives, grapes, raisins, chocolate, candy, gum, avocado, alcohol, caffeine, salt, and more. It’s important to never leave harmful foods out on the countertops or table where pets could swipe them down.

Human Medication

Did you know that a variety of human medicines—everything from aspirin, cough syrup, and antidepressants to prescription pills and over-the-counter medications—can harm a pet if they ingest too much? Keep your medicine cabinet sealed tight at all times, and store your own medications and those of your pet separately so as not to mix them up.

Cleaning Supplies

Your supply closet contains all sorts of potentially harmful chemicals, from bleach and ammonia to household disinfectants, floor cleaner, and wood polish. Close and lock your supply closet when you’re not using the products inside, and keep your pet elsewhere if you’re using harmful chemicals.

Call your Marietta, GA veterinarian’s office for further advice.